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Gayle in MD
09-25-2010, 11:40 AM
Ready for RW attack. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif All nutty, nasty RW attacks, on ignore. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

LWW
09-25-2010, 12:11 PM
How about a simple question?

Do you attribute the rise to the actions of the regime, and if so why?

LWW

jimmyg
09-25-2010, 12:20 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style="color: #CC0000">Ready for RW attack. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif All nutty, nasty RW attacks, on ignore.</span> /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif </div></div>

Why not explain the forces that are driving the DOW?

Is it a booming economy with full employment? Or perhaps, hidden losses and mark to myth accounting, $trillions of stimulus money given to banks to engage in HFT, earning at the expense of investment and employment spending? Any idea whatsoever?

41 Million on food stamps. Seven million additional foreclosures in the pipeline. 99 weeks of unemployment. Things are great. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

No reason to insult your positions, they do a very good job of that on their own. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

J

LWW
09-26-2010, 03:30 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jimmyg</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style="color: #CC0000">Ready for RW attack. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif All nutty, nasty RW attacks, on ignore.</span> /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif </div></div>

Why not explain the forces that are driving the DOW?
J </div></div>

That's funny James ... thanks for starting my AM with a chuckle.

LWW

pooltchr
09-26-2010, 06:11 AM
G and H have finally figured out that if they pretend to ignore those who would challenge them, they don't get embarassed by their ignorance.

Their new plan allows them to post their crap, and then not have to defeend it.

Hit and Run!

Chicken S***


Steve

LWW
09-26-2010, 06:19 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">G and H have finally figured out that if they pretend to ignore those who would challenge them, they don't get embarassed by their ignorance.

Steve </div></div>

The Eddie Long debacle has proven that wrong.

That was so humiliating that I feel embarrassed for them.

LWW

llotter
09-26-2010, 07:40 AM
The only explanation that fits the rise in the market is that it has become very short-term oriented because most people know that the economy is going bust sometime soon unless there is some very dramatic cuts in government spending. This will entail a lot of hardship, especially for those who now work for government that need to be fired but because they are mostly Democrats, very few will be shedding any tears. Reintroducing freedom and personal responsibility is the only possibility of regaining our economic strength and the moral high-ground needed for the leader of the free world.

Chopstick
09-26-2010, 11:54 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Ready for RW attack. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif All nutty, nasty RW attacks, on ignore. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif </div></div>

You need to change your information service. That is not correct for the DJIA, S&P, or the E-minis. Aside from that, the uptrend this month is on very thin volume. The big boys are either still on vacation or they are sitting it out waiting to see what happens.

Sev
09-26-2010, 03:16 PM
Its my understanding some people hate sex.

Qtec
09-26-2010, 08:14 PM
I think you missed a bit.

Allow me,

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sev: " Its my understanding some people hate sex....with me." </div></div>

I could have guessed that.

Q

LWW
09-27-2010, 02:41 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jimmyg</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Why not explain the forces that are driving the DOW?

J </div></div>

In agitprop land what drives the markets is easy to explain ... when it goes up it's because of the regime, when it goes down it's because of Bush.

LWW

Gayle in MD
09-27-2010, 04:21 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chopstick</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Ready for RW attack. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smirk.gif All nutty, nasty RW attacks, on ignore. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif </div></div>

You need to change your information service. That is not correct for the DJIA, S&P, or the E-minis. Aside from that, the uptrend this month is on very thin volume. The big boys are either still on vacation or they are sitting it out waiting to see what happens. </div></div>


http://money.cnn.com/2010/09/21/markets/sunday_lookahead/index.htm


http://billionaires.forbes.com/article/01nfcUP3739be?q=billionaire+OR+billionaires+OR+bil lionaire's


http://www.bullfax.com/?q=node-dow-track-best-September-1939


http://www.iowastatedaily.com/business/beyond/article_39696e02-c9a1-11df-807c-001cc4c002e0.html


http://www.buzzcrunch.net/2010/09/dow-on-track-for-the-best-september-since-1939/

http://mobile.timesnews.net/article.php?id=9026530



Dow on track for the best September since 1939
By staff report


Published September 25th, 2010 | Comments

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The summer has come to an end, and so has the market slump that came with it. With little on tap to challenge the recent rally, stocks are on track to close September with the biggest monthly gains in over a year.

Though September is typically down month on Wall Street and the economic recovery remains sluggish, investors have taken cues from recent upbeat economic news to propel major indexes sharply higher during the month after a sell-off in August.

"We've been seeing modestly favorable economic numbers lately, which has allowed markets to keep moving up," said Stephen Carl, head equity trader at Williams Capital Group.

So far, the Dow has rallied 8.4%, which would be the best monthly gain since July 2009, when the blue-chip index added 8.6%. The latest lift also puts the Dow on track for its best September since 1939, when it rose 13.5%.

jimmyg
09-27-2010, 08:36 AM
Yes, WWII was great. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif J

1939

The United States will begin emerging from the Depression as it borrows and spends $1 billion to build its armed forces. From 1939 to 1941, when the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor, U.S. manufacturing will have shot up a phenomenal 50 percent!
The Depression is ending worldwide as nations prepare for the coming hostilities.

Roosevelt began relatively modest deficit spending that arrested the slide of the economy and resulted in some astonishing growth numbers. (Roosevelt's average growth of 5.2 percent during the Great Depression is even higher than Reagan's 3.7 percent growth during his so-called 'Seven Fat Years!') When 1936 saw a phenomenal record of 14 percent growth, Roosevelt eased back on the deficit spending, worried about balancing the budget. But this only caused the economy to slip back into a recession in 1938.

World War II starts with Hitler's invasion of Poland

Gayle in MD
09-27-2010, 07:14 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Independent and private analysts agree stimulus significantly raised employment over what would have happened otherwise
CEA: ARRA raised employment "by between 2.2 and 2.8 million." In its third quarterly report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA] of 2009, the White House's Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) stated: "The CEA estimates that as of the first quarter of 2010, the ARRA has raised employment relative to what it otherwise would have been by between 2.2 and 2.8 million. These estimates are similar to those of other analysts, and are broadly consistent with the direct recipient reporting data available for 2009:Q4."

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>CBO estimates job impact of between 1.2 and 2.7 million. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated in February that as of the fourth quarter of 2009, "ARRA added between 1.0 million and 2.1 million to the number of workers employed in the United States." The CEA report stated that CBO estimates that as of the first quarter of 2010, the Recovery Act raised employment by between 1.2 and 2.7 million.</span>
IHS/Global Insight estimates job impact of 1.7 million. PolitiFact.com stated on February 17 that "[u]sing updated estimates provided to PolitiFact, IHS/Global Insight estimates that 1.7 million jobs will be created or saved by the first quarter of 2010." The CEA report also cites this estimate from IHS/Global Insight.

Moody's economy.com estimates job impact of 1.9 million. The PolitiFact post further stated that "[u]sing updated estimates provided to PolitiFact ... Moody's economy.com estimated that 1.9 million jobs will be created or saved" by the first quarter of 2010. The CEA report also cited this estimate from Moody's economy.com.

Macroeconomic Advisers estimates job impact of 1.5 million. The CEA report stated that Macroeconomic Advisers estimates that the Recovery Act raised employment by 1.46 million as of the first quarter of 2010, citing an analysis provided to CEA.

Administration's estimate of stimulus job impact calculated from "the no-stimulus baseline." In a January 9, 2009, report on the job impact of a "prototypical" stimulus package "in the range that the President-Elect has discussed," Christina Romer and Jared Bernstein estimated that a stimulus package would raise employment by between "3.3 to 4.1 million jobs" by the end of 2010. The report clearly notes that this estimate is calculated "relative to the no-stimulus baseline."
</div></div>

Chopstick
09-27-2010, 09:28 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Independent and private analysts agree stimulus significantly raised employment over what would have happened otherwise
CEA: ARRA raised employment "by between 2.2 and 2.8 million." In its third quarterly report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA] of 2009, the White House's Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) stated: "The CEA estimates that as of the first quarter of 2010, the ARRA has raised employment relative to what it otherwise would have been by between 2.2 and 2.8 million. These estimates are similar to those of other analysts, and are broadly consistent with the direct recipient reporting data available for 2009:Q4."

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>CBO estimates job impact of between 1.2 and 2.7 million. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimated in February that as of the fourth quarter of 2009, "ARRA added between 1.0 million and 2.1 million to the number of workers employed in the United States." The CEA report stated that CBO estimates that as of the first quarter of 2010, the Recovery Act raised employment by between 1.2 and 2.7 million.</span>
IHS/Global Insight estimates job impact of 1.7 million. PolitiFact.com stated on February 17 that "[u]sing updated estimates provided to PolitiFact, IHS/Global Insight estimates that 1.7 million jobs will be created or saved by the first quarter of 2010." The CEA report also cites this estimate from IHS/Global Insight.

Moody's economy.com estimates job impact of 1.9 million. The PolitiFact post further stated that "[u]sing updated estimates provided to PolitiFact ... Moody's economy.com estimated that 1.9 million jobs will be created or saved" by the first quarter of 2010. The CEA report also cited this estimate from Moody's economy.com.

Macroeconomic Advisers estimates job impact of 1.5 million. The CEA report stated that Macroeconomic Advisers estimates that the Recovery Act raised employment by 1.46 million as of the first quarter of 2010, citing an analysis provided to CEA.

Administration's estimate of stimulus job impact calculated from "the no-stimulus baseline." In a January 9, 2009, report on the job impact of a "prototypical" stimulus package "in the range that the President-Elect has discussed," Christina Romer and Jared Bernstein estimated that a stimulus package would raise employment by between "3.3 to 4.1 million jobs" by the end of 2010. The report clearly notes that this estimate is calculated "relative to the no-stimulus baseline."
</div></div> </div></div>

Thanks for putting it in big letters and for putting space between the paragraphs. I'm serious. Trying to read those big blocks of text is really hard for me. It's because when I read something, I pause and think about what I just read. If it's just one huge block of text I can't find where I left off so I stopped trying. Just a suggestion, but I have another reason for this response.

First, I do not agree with the above. It is my destiny to be contrarian. However, I did want to tell you about something. I have a live audio feed to the S&P 500 futures trading pit at the CME. There is an individual calling out every trade and everyone who is making the trades all day long. It is in the format of an auctioneer and the action moves fast sometimes. He even calls out what they are wearing and what kind of mood they are in.

Anyway, there are a few of these traders that are capable of buying or selling the entire market on their say. They are mostly the representatives of the big firms like GS, etc. There is this one trader who is a legend in his own time who acts on his own. He is independent and not affiliated with any firm. He is referred to as number 1. Most people say that listening to the pit squawk is like putting an egg beater inside your head. In the beginning it is. After you get used to it it is like listening to the baseball game on the radio.

Number 1 is always short. He is even quoted as saying the longest I have ever been is short 20. I have personally witnessed number 1 step forward and short the entire S&P 500 pit in a market rally. Talk about balls of steel. Anyway, to get to the point, you have been posting positive things about the turn of the market lately and I felt that it is only right to let you know that number 1 was long today right from the open even when the rest of the market was going down. He stayed long all morning which is extreme for him.

I also closed the day a slight percentage long. Hope I don't get chewed out for that. So, if it works out, it's Bush's fault and if it doesn't, it's Obama's fault. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Traders don't care who does what as long as someone does something. They just trade it. That is what they are.

Gayle in MD
09-28-2010, 06:35 AM
Thanks so much, Chop, for an interesting post. It's really nice to have the opportunity to share information, on here.

I'm not sure why you don't agree with the information above, CBO, as far as I know, is really not partisan, but an independent agency.

I'm not at all a gambler, so I could never do what you do, but I hope you'll continue to share stories with us about your experiences in your new endeavor.

As for me, IMHO, this is a great time to invest in income producing real estate. There are plenty of great deals out there, and everyone has to live somewhere. Even when real estate takes a hit, if one knows how to invest, as we can see, rental properties are just more in demand.

Good luck, and keep us abreast of what's going on. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif



G.

LWW
09-28-2010, 10:25 AM
The stock market is rising because:

1 - The Federal Reserve is buying stocks in an effort to prop up the regime, thus inflating another bubble which will burst ... robbing non savvy citizens of further wealth.

2 - The Federal Reserve is buying Treasuries in an effort to keep rates artificially low and prop up the regime and thus attempting to keep the bubble inflated as long as possible ... robbing non savvy citizens of further wealth.

3 - Some naive citizens are buying stocks because they have been duped into believing the bubble isn't a bubble, but a boom.

4 - Some naive citizens are buying stocks in anticipation of the demokooks losing congress, and believing against all logic that the damage done by the regime will heal quickly.

The stock market is not growing because of solid financial growth or corporate profits growing in the near term.

LWW

jimmyg
09-28-2010, 10:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The stock market is rising because:

1 - The Federal Reserve is buying stocks in an effort to prop up the regime, thus inflating another bubble which will burst ... robbing non savvy citizens of further wealth.

2 - The Federal Reserve is buying Treasuries in an effort to keep rates artificially low and prop up the regime and thus attempting to keep the bubble inflated as long as possible ... robbing non savvy citizens of further wealth.

3 - Some naive citizens are buying stocks because they have been duped into believing the bubble isn't a bubble, but a boom.

4 - Some naive citizens are buying stocks in anticipation of the demokooks losing congress, and believing against all logic that the damage done by the regime will heal quickly.

The stock market is not growing because of solid financial growth or corporate profits growing in the near term. LWW </div></div>

All totally true Larry, Let me just add a few comments.

1. There is no economic recovery because there is no longer a US econom. Our manufacturing base was initially exported overseas for cheap labor, in exchange for service jobs, fantasy financial engineering, and finally collapse and unemployment.

2. Real estate is still overpriced in relation to the public's ability to service the debt incurred when buying at current levels in a manner that traditionally ensures a low level of default; 20% down, LTV of 80%, and front end loan to income ratios of no more than roughly 30% (this ratio used to be 28%) of gross income.

There are about a year of inventory on MLS, plus "shadow" inventory of about 7 million homes in various stages of default and foreclosure, plus an enormous number of homes taken off the market by individuals just waiting to re enter inventory.

Prices will most likely retreat, depending on your area, an additional amout of between roughly 10% and 30%.

J