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bluewolf
09-06-2002, 11:24 AM
scott taught me this good stroke.but my hand tremors are so bad that it makes my stroke go crooked so i cant hit the cb right. i tried changing my stance and trying different weight of cues and that did not help.the shake is worse sometimes than others and is a physical thing,not nerves.i tried once to hold the butt tighter and that made it worse too.

i am wondering if i hold tighter with my bridge hand if that will help.

i am going to get another lesson with scott as soon as he can fit me into his scedule, but in the meantime, any ideas i could try?

there has got to be a way around this

bw

Eric.
09-06-2002, 12:04 PM
Just kidding. I had similar problems with my back.
Try taking muscle relaxers. If you are drug adverse, try using weights(light dumbell) and work your shooting arm til the muscles are slightly fatigued. This helps to keep the arm somewhat loose. I understand that your problem is neurological, but by fatiguing the muscles, it does seem to lessen the shakes. Hopefully, this might help?

Eric >not to be construed as medical advice, serious bodily harm may occur if not used as intended, in all cases the manufacturer assumes no liability, please consult your physician (C.Y.A.)

PQQLK9
09-06-2002, 12:12 PM
Hey BW I would suggest a LIGHTER bridge grip as it seems to work for me even though it LOOKS unsteady...Scott and I also went over this...If I put a lot of pressure on my bridge hand it induces chronic pain and I don't like to get too many cortesone shots...here's a link to my condition...all the best to you.. <a target="_blank" href=http://www.eatonhand.com/hw/hw003.htm.>http://www.eatonhand.com/hw/hw003.htm.</a>

09-06-2002, 02:22 PM
If you have not done so, by all means talk with a physician or neurologist. Because of all the research on Parkinsons disease, there are a lot of new drugs out that may help your problem.

I know what you are going through. I just came back to pool after a four year absence caused by a prescription drug that produced severe tremors as a known side effect. For the first few months I tried to fight it and learn to live with it, but eventually the frustration caused me to lay down my stick.

I sympathize with your problem and wish you the very best!

TonyM
09-06-2002, 02:58 PM
The best advice that I can give you is to try and find a cue with a pivot point near your normal bridge length (this rules out a Predator shaft btw).

What this means is that if you can line the shot up accurately to begin with, then even if your stroke swoops or swerves on the final delivery, the squirt produces by the accidental sidespin will correct for the incorrect cue angle. This only works for a relatively high squirt cue.

So to apply intentional sidespin, you would need to use back hand english. I know several players with severe hand tremors, and they all employ this trick to make shots (even Nick Varner!).

The key is to align the cue correctly in the first place, and then try and stroke it to the best of your abilities, and not worry about the effect of the tremor.

I've seen players with severe tremors shoot the lights out, so if they can do it, so can you.

Good luck!

Tony

Cueless Joey
09-06-2002, 03:46 PM
I suggest using a Meucci cue. The shaft will shake in sync with the tremor. If you tremor to the left, the tip will shake to the right. Presto! You are dead on.
j/k bw. I hope you beat this problem. My middle finger has tightness now. I might get a surgery for it. I can still play with it but it's a discomfort.

bluewolf
09-06-2002, 04:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Eric.:</font><hr> Just kidding. I had similar problems with my back.
Try taking muscle relaxers. If you are drug adverse, try using weights(light dumbell) and work your shooting arm til the muscles are slightly fatigued. This helps to keep the arm somewhat loose. I understand that your problem is neurological, but by fatiguing the muscles, it does seem to lessen the shakes. Hopefully, this might help?

Eric &gt;not to be construed as medical advice, serious bodily harm may occur if not used as intended, in all cases the manufacturer assumes no liability, please consult your physician (C.Y.A.) <hr></blockquote>

thanks for everyones suggestions. yeah it is probably parkinsons knowing my luck. cant take muscle relaxers cuz they make me get depressed. i had hand tremors as a child but just getting worse. the bad thing is they arent consistent.sometimes a little, sometimes so bad i have to get the cashier to write the check.

do you think a beer before i play would help ?

bw

Voodoo Daddy
09-06-2002, 05:31 PM
Since 1992, my hands shake out of nowhere. Its all linked to psoriasis, which showed its ugliness shortly after Hurricane Andrew. If you can block out the things that distract you while you play...the shaking will not be a factor . I'm not saying you'll be cured of it, you just wont notice it and will be able to enjoy this torture we play daily...HAHAHAHAHA

09-06-2002, 06:45 PM
I have a similar problem as a result of an accident. I've
tried several things also. Tightening the grip may seem to help in the short term but actually makes it worse after a while. For my self I find that if I pump or stroke my arm 4 to 6 fast strokes then pause with the tip at the cueball and allow my arm to relax I have overcome the pulling. My stroke goes straight thru. The key seems to be the pause. I hope this helps a little. Good luck, John

Bob C
09-06-2002, 07:05 PM
There is a decent player in Ft. Myers, Florida by the name of Ed (his last name escapes me at the moment) who is in his 70s and has a bridge-hand tremor. He solves the problem by using a loop of braided plastic (like lacing used in leatherwork) around his wrist. The long tail of which, is brought under his thumb and up between his thumb and index finger. It is then looped over the cue shaft and brought down again between his thumb and index finger. In other words, he is holding a loop of the cord between his thumb and index figure. There was a rule challenge over this in Las Vegas a couple of years ago and it was held to be within the rules (not much different that using a bridge--the kind that is found under the table.

This is difficult to explain , but the principle is quite simple and, for Ed, very effective. I'm sure some of you guys in South Florida have seen him play. Bob C

Scott Lee
09-07-2002, 01:48 AM
I just spent last Saturday with Ralph S. in Ft. Wayne, IN. He told me of another player who did the same thing, because of shaking hands...only I think it was more like a nylon cord...but definitely looped around the shaft, and then around his hand, just as you described. Maybe Bluewolf can try that out and see if it helps.

Scott Lee

bluewolf
09-07-2002, 05:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Since 1992, my hands shake out of nowhere. Its all linked to psoriasis, which showed its ugliness shortly after Hurricane Andrew. If you can block out the things that distract you while you play...the shaking will not be a factor . I'm not saying you'll be cured of it, you just wont notice it and will be able to enjoy this torture we play daily...HAHAHAHAHA <hr></blockquote>

i always thought it would be easier to adapt if it was always the same. but it isnt i can play like a 4 with the mind of a 5 or like a 2 on any given day lol. luckily apa has me as a two from 3 years ago and i am on a fun laid back team so at least in competition the pressure is off for now.

scott is coming back here in a couple of months and said he will help me with this.he is a very nice person to help me with this./ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

bw

NH_Steve
09-07-2002, 06:01 AM
Try adding a breathing pattern to your pre-shot routine. I believe archers use that technique to take advantage of the steadiest part of their breathing cycle to improve their accuracy.

I have certainly seen excellent players who had tremors in their warm-ups, but seemed unaffected in their final stroke, so stay with it!

bluewolf
09-07-2002, 06:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: NH_Steve:</font><hr> Try adding a breathing pattern to your pre-shot routine. I believe archers use that technique to take advantage of the steadiest part of their breathing cycle to improve their accuracy.

I have certainly seen excellent players who had tremors in their warm-ups, but seemed unaffected in their final stroke, so stay with it! <hr></blockquote>

thanks. that time i went into the zone..before i went in i was shaking as bad ass i ever had,then i went into the zone and i noticed my hands werent shaking anymore. weird,only time i have known that my hands did not shake.

bluewolf

09-07-2002, 11:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: bluewolf:</font><hr>...but my hand tremors are so bad that it makes my stroke go crooked so i cant hit the cb right,...any ideas i could try?

there has got to be a way around this

bw <hr></blockquote>

You may want to keep an eye out or contact one of these players who may have a similar condition?

Nick Varner
Dick Lane
Michael Coltrain

all are fine players who may have different insights or suggestions?BS

#### leonard
09-09-2002, 04:17 PM
I screwed my arm up with fast pitch softball, what I would do is practice stroking while walking around the table but when I got down to shoot I would just line the shot up and shoot. I beat some pretty good people that way.####

jjinfla
09-09-2002, 06:44 PM
Hi, If you ever get a chance to watch Nick Varner his right hand really shakes and I would say everyone considers him a pretty good player. Hopefully you have already discussed the problem with your doctor. If not, then hopefully you will the next time you see him. since you are a 2 in APA I would just suggest that you concentrate on hitting the exact center of the cue ball on every shot and really concentrate on that and maybe you can trick your mind into forgetting about the shake. And have a loose grip. Since you can't stop the shake and you want to play pool just try and deal with it the best you can and enjoy the game. Jake