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Qtec
02-12-2011, 04:47 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Wal-Mart has become one of America’s most successful retail chains by offering everyday goods at low prices for working families.

But just how is Wal-Mart able to charge less than many of their rivals, and what has their success done for their employees?

Documentary filmmaker Robert Greenwald takes a look inside the discount retailer’s empire in Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, and discovers a company short on scruples and long on shabby treatment of the people who work for them.

Watch the full documentary now </div></div>

watch the first 10 mins at least. (http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/wal-mart-the-high-cost-of-low-price/)

Q

LWW
02-12-2011, 05:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Wal-Mart has become one of America’s most successful retail chains by offering everyday goods at low prices for working families.

But just how is Wal-Mart able to charge less than many of their rivals<span style="color: #3333FF">By offering lower prices.</span>, and what has their success done for their employees <span style="color: #3333FF">Give them employment.</span>?

Documentary filmmaker Robert Greenwald takes a look inside the discount retailer’s empire in Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, and discovers a company short on scruples and long on shabby treatment of the people who work for them.

Watch the full documentary now </div></div>

watch the first 10 mins at least. (http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/wal-mart-the-high-cost-of-low-price/)

Q </div></div>

I've already seen it.

It's a lamentation on of the end result of the left's assault on the US industrial base.

What harms today's poor isn't an uneven distribution of wealth ... it's an uneven distribution of capitalism.

LWW

Chopstick
02-12-2011, 06:29 AM
Yeah and the state treats them soooo much better.

LWW
02-12-2011, 06:38 AM
The closer to free market economies you get, the higher the standard of living of the average citizen ... the closer you get to a state ran economy, the worse off the average citizen is.

The closer to free market economies you get, the higher the standard air and water is ... the closer you get to a state ran economy, the worse off the air and water is.

The closer to free market economies you get, the higher the industrial and mining safety gets ... the closer you get to a state ran economy, the worse it gets.

The closer to free market economies you get, the better consumer protection there is ... the closer you get to a state ran economy, the worse the consumer protection gets.

LWW

pooltchr
02-12-2011, 08:20 AM
If a box of Rice Krispies costs $3 at Kroger, and $2.75 at Wal-Mart, can anyone explain how that is hurting Americans?
Kellogg is still making and selling their product, Wal-Mart is still employing the stock clerk and the cashier, and the mother of 3 has a little extra in her weekly food budget.

How is this a bad thing????????????

Steve

LWW
02-12-2011, 12:37 PM
In the mind of a capitalist ... this is a beautiful thing. The corn flakes will find the lowest price at which they can be sold and a profit still be made. Walmart employees will probably make slightly less than Krogers which will create entry level and low skill jobs that otherwise wouldn't exist, but the rest of America will enjoy more disposable income which they will spend on items other than corn flakes which will employ Americans that otherwise wouldn't have a job. Krogers will pay slightly more and have their pick of the crop of people with grocery experience, which will provide for a slightly more upscale shopping experience which will appeal to the slightly more affluent which aren't as price sensitive. Everyone in the equation wins, although some win a little more or less than others..

To a collectivist, this is horrible. The seed seller must have their price and production of seeds limited. The farmer must have his prices fixed and the amount of acreage used dictated for him. The market price of corn ... as well as cardboard boxes, wax paper inner packaging, driver's fuel costs and miles driven daily ... must be regulated by the omnipotent omniscient and omnipresent state. The grocer's prices must be set so that a box of corn flakes costs the same at every store across the fruited plain. The amount of corn flakes each family is allowed must be regulated from sea to shining sea. In the end a box of corn flakes must cost $147.33 and must be ordered 8 months in advance ... but the system will at least be fair as the misery is equally distributed amongst all.

LWW

llotter
02-13-2011, 05:36 AM
I did manage to watch the first 10 minutes but the tears in my eyes prevented me from continuing.