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klarsen
03-15-2011, 08:45 AM
The ProShot Glove has just received the BCA & ACS Seals of Approval as a teaching/training aid. This devise is endorsed by the number player in the world Mika Immonen as well as Rodney Morris, Jennifer Barretta, Florian Kohler, Zion Zva and many more pro's and teachers.
You can see it at http://www.greatbilliards.com

eightnine
03-16-2011, 03:41 PM
family leisure pool tables (http://www.familyleisure.com/Pool-Tables-Billiards-Tables)
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: klarsen</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The ProShot Glove has just received the BCA & ACS Seals of Approval as a teaching/training aid. This devise is endorsed by the number player in the world Mika Immonen as well as Rodney Morris, Jennifer Barretta, Florian Kohler, Zion Zva and many more pro's and teachers.
You can see it at http://www.greatbilliards.com
</div></div>
I wouldn't put too much stock into the fact that it is endorsed by players. As we know, pool is one of the least lucrative sports out there where it's tough to make a decent living unless you're a truly elite player. Endorsements are a way to cushion that a bit. I like the old fashion training technique. Perfect your stroke, then rack 'em and crack 'em.

JJFSTAR
03-17-2011, 01:19 AM
Welcome to the board eightnine! I am glad to see someone new with good insight. I look forward to your future posts.

SpiderMan
03-18-2011, 12:46 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: klarsen</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The ProShot Glove has just received the BCA & ACS Seals of Approval as a teaching/training aid. This devise is endorsed by the number player in the world Mika Immonen as well as Rodney Morris, Jennifer Barretta, Florian Kohler, Zion Zva and many more pro's and teachers.
You can see it at http://www.greatbilliards.com
</div></div>

Let me guess - you must be "Keith Larsen, inventor and co-developer of the ProShot Glove". And you are spamming.

SpiderMan

Soflasnapper
03-20-2011, 12:27 PM
An interesting claim is made in that link, that most shots are missed because of an errant tip that moves off the intended contact point with the cue ball.

I'm sure if that were to happen, missing is likely. But is it really true that this is the main reason shots are missed, considering there are many other factors?

Rich R.
03-20-2011, 08:18 PM
They say that this item is a teaching and training aide. Does anyone know if it would be legal to wear this contraption, or any other type of wrist support, during competition?

And, for the instuctors out there, would it be good for a student to use this thing? IMHO, sooner or later a student has to learn to hold their hand and wrist properly. What good would this support do, if any?

Tony_in_MD
03-21-2011, 05:30 AM
Will you be able to attach weights to it next?

LWW
03-21-2011, 05:31 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">An interesting claim is made in that link, that most shots are missed because of an errant tip that moves off the intended contact point with the cue ball.

I'm sure if that were to happen, missing is likely. But is it really true that this is the main reason shots are missed, considering there are many other factors?

</div></div>

Well, assuming you use the correct cue speed and aim, if you hit the CB correctly then you hit the OB correctly ... and if you hit the OB correctly with the CB you make the shot.

Logically, if you don't have the basics of aim and speed down then you probably aren't looking at aids that cost as much as a lot of people pay for their first cue.

It makes some sense, but at a glance doesn't seem to be anything more than a wrist brace like many bowlers use.

Fran Crimi
03-21-2011, 06:42 AM
I can see an argument being made that if a glove is allowed in competition, then the wrist strap should also be allowed. They both act as aids to the body.

I haven't seen or tried it, but I think it might serve a purpose for those players who twist their wrists unnecessarily, often due to unconscious steering.

Having said that, I also feel that the post is clearly SPAM and the thread should be removed.

cushioncrawler
03-21-2011, 05:21 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">An interesting claim is made in that link, that most shots are missed because of an errant tip that moves off the intended contact point with the cue ball. I'm sure if that were to happen, missing is likely. But is it really true that this is the main reason shots are missed, considering there are many other factors?</div></div>This got me thinking. I just then got out a mechanical bridge that i made years ago. I put it on a (short) cue shaft. And i uzed it to hit a few shots that i kood eezyly reech.
Here the mech-bridge allowed me to hold my cue at the very end, and allowed me to hav a short bridge-length -- and allowed me to uze my normal stance and aktion.
The rezults were magik. I got akurat shots, and akurat skrew -- magik.

I will definitely take it to my games. It will be legal if needed to help reech the shot, but wouldnt be legal if not.
Pity -- the (short) mech-bridge iz magik for any shot needing super akuracy.

The mech-bridge -- i made it from a thick slab of aluminium. It haz multiple Vees and holes allso, so that u can aim very low or very hi, and tween.
And, i lined the Vees and holes with (green) bedkloth, ie they are nice and soft and slippery.
U kan slip a shaft from a spare cue etc into any hole to help uze it -- or u kan even hold it in your hand direktly, but this duznt gain u much.
mac.

Scott Lee
03-26-2011, 09:21 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eightnine</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I wouldn't put too much stock into the fact that it is endorsed by players. As we know, pool is one of the least lucrative sports out there where it's tough to make a decent living unless you're a truly elite player. Endorsements are a way to cushion that a bit. I like the old fashion training technique. Perfect your stroke, then rack 'em and crack 'em. </div></div>

eightnine...I am neither recommending or denigrating this glove. Just so you know, none of those players are getting a dime from Great Billiards, nor are any of the instructors who "endorsed"/recommended it.

Scott Lee