PDA

View Full Version : sports records that will never be broken



sack316
03-20-2011, 03:29 PM
not sure if I've ever done one of these on here before or not. But earlier this month was Wilt's anniversary of the 100 point game, and it got me thinking about some records that won't be broken. I'll start with a couple of baseball ones. Discuss/dispute what I put if you'd like, or add some of your own! I'll try one of the little less obvious ones first:

Sam Crawford's 309 career triples! Sounds insane by today's standards. Smaller ballparks all around, I see no way for this one to ever be touched.

Also gotta add in Cy Young's career win record of 511. Pitchers simply don't pitch that many games anymore... or as deep into the ones they do pitch. Get out there and win 20 games for 25 years in a row and you'd still have to come back and win another dozen in the next season. Just will never happen.

Ty Cobb's career batting average of .365. Pujols is the active career leader, and as great as he is he'd still need to boost his figure by over 30 points.

Rickey Henderson's 1406 career stolen bases. The stolen base is a lost art form these days... and even if it weren't that is just a ridiculous number. I believe Juan Pierre is the active leader with 527 right now. Impressive as that is, he'd still need about 18+ more seasons at his current pace to get there.

Sack

LWW
03-20-2011, 04:25 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">not sure if I've ever done one of these on here before or not. But earlier this month was Wilt's anniversary of the 100 point game

Sack

</div></div>

For that to be broken would require a stunt, which Wilt's 100 pt game was.

LWW
03-20-2011, 04:27 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sam Crawford's 309 career triples! Sounds insane by today's standards. Smaller ballparks all around, I see no way for this one to ever be touched.

Sack

</div></div>

I agree with that one as well ... except IMHO the main reason he set the record in the first place was in the dead ball era OF'ers played much shallower, had glorified oven mitts for gloves, groundskeeping was done by goats, and on SRO opportunities fans were sold spaces in the OF to muck about.

LWW
03-20-2011, 04:29 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Also gotta add in Cy Young's career win record of 511. Pitchers simply don't pitch that many games anymore... or as deep into the ones they do pitch. Get out there and win 20 games for 25 years in a row and you'd still have to come back and win another dozen in the next season. Just will never happen.

Ty Cobb's career batting average of .365. Pujols is the active career leader, and as great as he is he'd still need to boost his figure by over 30 points.

Sack

</div></div>

Fundamental changes to the game would have to happen for either of those to fall IMHO.

LWW
03-20-2011, 04:30 PM
quote=sack316]Rickey Henderson's 1406 career stolen bases.

Sack

[/quote]

That one I think will fall as post steroids the SB is making a comeback, but it will probably stand as long as it did when Cobb held it.

LWW
03-20-2011, 04:32 PM
And let me add in Germany Schaefer's record of stealing 1B one time along with Edward Carl Gaedel's record of playing at 3 ft 7 inches tall.

I would honestly be shocked if anyone shorter than Freddie Patek ever made it again.

LWW
03-21-2011, 02:44 AM
Also Nolan Ryan's 7 no hit complete games and 18 one hit complete games.

LWW
03-21-2011, 02:48 AM
John Samuel Vander Meer's two consecutive no hit complete games.

LWW
03-21-2011, 04:52 AM
The Harlem Globetrotters 1,270 consecutive wins will also be a tough one to ever top.

sack316
03-21-2011, 01:23 PM
I doubt Favre's streak will ever be repeated either.

I also say that Ripken's won't... but then again I would have never guessed anyone would break the one he did.

Sack

Soflasnapper
03-21-2011, 02:19 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">not sure if I've ever done one of these on here before or not. But earlier this month was Wilt's anniversary of the 100 point game

Sack

</div></div>

For that to be broken would require a stunt, which Wilt's 100 pt game was. </div></div>

I agree, and we saw something similar when David Robinson was battling George Gervin for the scoring title at the end of the regular season. Gervin went off for 50 or 60, but Robinson had the advantage of going second, plus knowing how many he needed to score. His teammates fed him and fed him and fed him, and Robinson ended up with the 72 or 73 points he needed to take the scoring title by about 0.1 points per game.

If Robinson could do it, some other monster scorer could have as well, if they were exclusively fed the ball. I'd say Shaq in his prime was capable, if so fed, if he could have kept from being called for offensive fouls.

However, other Wilt records were not so gimmicky. When asked if the 100 point game was the highlight of his career, he said no, that would be the 56 rebounds in one game he had against Bill Russell. Of course, he also averaged more than 48 minutes a game one season, by playing every regulation minute of every game, and all overtime minutes as well. AVERAGING over 50 points a game for an entire season is also an impossible record to beat, feeding someone exclusively or not.

Another record that will stand is the Don Larsen perfect game in the World Series. Someone may eventually tie it, but to break it would require TWO perfect pitched WS games, and the odds on that are extremely long.

wolfdancer
03-21-2011, 03:01 PM
The Admiral was one of my all time favorite sports "heroes"
I didn't however appreciate Don Larson's Perfect Game back then, as I was not a Yankee fan. The Dodgers came back with a pitching gem of their own in a game 6 shutout....but sad to say, game 7 was another shutout by the Yankee pitchers

LWW
03-21-2011, 03:55 PM
How about Tyrus Raymond Cobb's three full seasons with a batting average above .400?

LWW
03-21-2011, 03:56 PM
Or Napoleon Lajoie's .426 average in 1901?

LWW
03-21-2011, 03:57 PM
Or Cobb's 12 batting championships ... including 9 in a row?

Soflasnapper
03-21-2011, 06:36 PM
These are all semi-insurmountable, if not actually impossible to break (and some are that as well).

Some others I don't expect to live to see broken are the 33 NBA game wins in a row (the record-setting LA Lakers in the year West and Chamberlain got the championship), or the 88 NCAA Division 1 basketball games in a row (the UCLA Bruins with then-Lew Alcindor).

And no, I don't count the ladies' record (staggering in its own right though it was) as breaking the Bruin's record.

sack316
03-21-2011, 08:11 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">These are all semi-insurmountable, if not actually impossible to break (and some are that as well).

Some others I don't expect to live to see broken are the 33 NBA game wins in a row (the record-setting LA Lakers in the year West and Chamberlain got the championship), or the 88 NCAA Division 1 basketball games in a row (the UCLA Bruins with then-Lew Alcindor).

And no, I don't count the ladies' record (staggering in its own right though it was) as breaking the Bruin's record. </div></div>

Since you do mention it, I'd add the UConn's women's streak in there too (in their own right). Playing field seems to be slowly leveling out recently (ie it's not ALL Uconn/Tenn all the time now). Still a long way off from having parity, but that streak will become increasingly hard to duplicate as more teams are becoming at least competitive now.

Sack

wolfdancer
03-21-2011, 11:09 PM
I remember the game that ended the bruins streak. My brother was in the Navy, stationed at T. I., had the weekend off, and was at my apt. I'm watching the game in one room and he was watching TV in another room. There's about 2 minutes left in the game and UCLA is up by 11pts as I remember. He comes into the living room and tells me that the Bruins have lost, and gives me the score, which meant they would either go scoreless, or get about 2 points the rest of the game. I tell him it's BS as I'm watching the game live, but turns out it's a delayed broadcast. Any other time I would have been pulling for N.D. but.....

LWW
03-22-2011, 02:43 AM
How about a 9 inning MLB game being played in under 51 minutes?

LWW
03-22-2011, 02:44 AM
How about a double header being played in under 2 hrs 7 mins?

LWW
03-22-2011, 02:46 AM
How about Red Barrett's 58 pitch complete game? The next closest is 67 pitches.

LWW
03-22-2011, 02:50 AM
Stan Williams 207 pitch game?

LWW
03-22-2011, 02:57 AM
How about Steve Carlton winning 27 for a team that only won 59 all year?

The rest of their starter went 4-10, 4-14, 2-15.

wolfdancer
03-22-2011, 03:13 PM
I doubt that Wilt Chamberlain's free throw percentage will ever be beaten....but then I thought that Calvin Murphy's record was safe until Rick Barry beat it.
I have a Muni league baseball record that remains intact, decades later. I went 0 for the season, which is not to say I didn't reach base, nor score. I think they were afraid of my "bat" and saved their best pitches to use against me, and then the questionable strikes called, and always giving the nod to the defense on close calls.....ok, truth was I couldn't hit a curve ball.
Sack, here's what I just picked up at WalMart, the other night, and for just $3....."such a deal"
Sportscenter, year in reviw, 2006
March To Madness...greatest moments of the NCAA
The Bronx Is Burning (3 disk set) of the 1977 world series.

Soflasnapper
03-22-2011, 05:24 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: wolfdancer</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I remember the game that ended the bruins streak. My brother was in the Navy, stationed at T. I., had the weekend off, and was at my apt. I'm watching the game in one room and he was watching TV in another room. There's about 2 minutes left in the game and UCLA is up by 11pts as I remember. He comes into the living room and tells me that the Bruins have lost, and gives me the score, which meant they would either go scoreless, or get about 2 points the rest of the game. I tell him it's BS as I'm watching the game live, but turns out it's a delayed broadcast. Any other time I would have been pulling for N.D. but..... </div></div>

ND? I thought it was the Houston game with the Big E, Elvin Hayes, but now that you mention it, yeah.

wolfdancer
03-22-2011, 05:43 PM
There was also a nice long streak of Notre Dame's with Digger Phelps as head coach...he was also the coach for that UCLA streak ending game. If I remember correctly,,,and my memory is a little suspect, the players may have revolted against him and "thrown" their streak ending game.....
I can't google anything to confirm that

punter
03-22-2011, 10:03 PM
Joe Dimaggio's hitting streak (56 games)
Jack Nicklaus' Major wins (gonna be tough for Tiger now)
Pistol Pete's PPG average in college (44.2, and no three point line).

wolfdancer
03-23-2011, 01:06 AM
I was in the Merchant Marine's and we were in port in N.O. watching basketball...LSU and one of the guys from the engine crew comes in and says "see that kid(Pete), that's my nephew and he's going to be drafted #1"
Well Pete took most of the shots, but he could score from anywhere, and had a pretty good avg, considering that he put up a lot of what would be 3 pointers today. "Hondo" said he was the best ball handler of all time( Hondo...John Havlicek) A real tragedy to die so young, at age 40

LWW
03-23-2011, 02:31 AM
How about Tom McCreery's 3 inside the park home runs in a game?

Or Jesse McDermott's 55 inside the park home runs in a career?

Or Sam Crawford's 12 inside the park home runs in a season?

LWW
03-23-2011, 02:33 AM
Or Bill Joyce's 4 triples in a game?

Qtec
03-23-2011, 04:58 AM
I've got one.
How about LWW's marathon posting stint to overtake Gayle as the top poster, cheered on by the Muppet Crew?

I think he deserves two trophies.
One for top poster and <span style='font-size: 17pt'>one for the 'Most pathetic individual' on the CCB.</span>

Q

LWW
03-23-2011, 06:38 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sack316</div><div class="ubbcode-body">not sure if I've ever done one of these on here before or not. But earlier this month was Wilt's anniversary of the 100 point game, and it got me thinking about some records that won't be broken. I'll start with a couple of baseball ones. Discuss/dispute what I put if you'd like, or add some of your own! I'll try one of the little less obvious ones first:

Sam Crawford's 309 career triples! Sounds insane by today's standards. Smaller ballparks all around, I see no way for this one to ever be touched.

Also gotta add in Cy Young's career win record of 511. Pitchers simply don't pitch that many games anymore... or as deep into the ones they do pitch. Get out there and win 20 games for 25 years in a row and you'd still have to come back and win another dozen in the next season. Just will never happen.

Ty Cobb's career batting average of .365. Pujols is the active career leader, and as great as he is he'd still need to boost his figure by over 30 points.

Rickey Henderson's 1406 career stolen bases. The stolen base is a lost art form these days... and even if it weren't that is just a ridiculous number. I believe Juan Pierre is the active leader with 527 right now. Impressive as that is, he'd still need about 18+ more seasons at his current pace to get there.

Sack

</div></div>

Well ... although not sports related, a benign non political NPR thread made it 3 days and 30 posts without being trolled by the cabal.

Sadly, that's about as good as it gets.

eg8r
03-23-2011, 08:28 AM
Records are meant to be broken. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif I hope every single one gets broken because that is what fuels interests in sports. It is what revived baseball when Sosa and McGwire were chasing history together.

eg8r

LWW
03-23-2011, 09:06 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Records are meant to be broken. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif I hope every single one gets broken because that is what fuels interests in sports. It is what revived baseball when Sosa and McGwire were chasing history together.

eg8r </div></div>

Agreed.

But, some records still stand only because the sport has changed ... and would most likely only change if the sport changed again.

That being said, I'd love to watch someone have a five triple game ... which IMHO will happen later than a five homer day will.

LWW
03-23-2011, 09:09 AM
Let me also add Rocky Marciano's 49-0 record.

I will also add that IMHO Larry Holmes, at 48-0, was robbed by the refs in his loss to Michael Spinks.

Soflasnapper
03-23-2011, 02:48 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Let me also add Rocky Marciano's 49-0 record.

I will also add that IMHO Larry Holmes, at 48-0, was robbed by the refs in his loss to Michael Spinks. </div></div>

I think Larry won both those fights with Spinks.

However, that shows that Larry Holmes got within one badly decided boxing match of tieing, and two wrong decisions from beating, the Marciano record. So that one may be more vulnerable than most of the ones discussed here, because none of them have been so close to being tied or broken.

Soflasnapper
03-23-2011, 02:52 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Records are meant to be broken. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif I hope every single one gets broken because that is what fuels interests in sports. It is what revived baseball when Sosa and McGwire were chasing history together.

eg8r </div></div>

Agreed.

But, some records still stand only because the sport has changed ... and would most likely only change if the sport changed again.

That being said, I'd love to watch someone have a five triple game ... which IMHO will happen later than a five homer day will. </div></div>

Given the large amounts of money the top sports athletes make, they will tire of the grind, and be more reluctant to fight through rehabbing late career injuries, than their sports' forebearers, so the LONGEVITY type records are quite likely to remain unbroken. Maybe A-Rod will prove an exception to this generally correct point, despite the record-shattering contract he received.

As for some record that will stand forever because of changes in the sport, the 4 x 110 yard relay world record set by USC with OJ Simpson and those black power gloved fist raisers from the Olympics is one, since that race is now changed to its metric equivalent (4 x 100 m.)

LWW
03-23-2011, 03:00 PM
Actually the big money seems to be producing the opposite effect, at least in baseball.

The average age of an MLB player continues to rise.

Two score and ten years ago a player who was 40 was exceedingly rare. Today it is quite common.

wolfdancer
03-23-2011, 03:07 PM
Rocco fought at about 185 lbs as I remember....he was really a light-heavyweight, but had a "12" inch knockout punch.
I saw the two fights with Jersey Joe, and the fight with Joe Lewis. Joe L. was way past his prime,and that fight probably would not have been sanctioned today.
XXX (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sD5uOEpV3zE&feature=player_detailpage)
Joe L. is one of my heroes, for knocking out Max Schmeling

LWW
03-24-2011, 03:17 AM
How about Trevor Berbick's being knocked down 3 times from one punch?

Soflasnapper
03-24-2011, 09:31 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Actually the big money seems to be producing the opposite effect, at least in baseball.

The average age of an MLB player continues to rise.

Two score and ten years ago a player who was 40 was exceedingly rare. Today it is quite common. </div></div>

This may be true, but do you have a cite for that?

Certainly I've noticed some 40-ish MLB players, even as a wholly disinterested person in baseball.

The training and nutrition these days is superior to what was around before, so people are extending their careers in ways that were impossible before. Is this really a trend, though?

LWW
03-24-2011, 09:40 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Let me also add Rocky Marciano's 49-0 record.

I will also add that IMHO Larry Holmes, at 48-0, was robbed by the refs in his loss to Michael Spinks. </div></div>

I think Larry won both those fights with Spinks.

However, that shows that Larry Holmes got within one badly decided boxing match of tieing, and two wrong decisions from beating, the Marciano record. So that one may be more vulnerable than most of the ones discussed here, because none of them have been so close to being tied or broken. </div></div>

True enough ... but Larry also had to face a total of zero Cuban, Soviet, eastern bloc or Chinese boxers either.

LWW
03-24-2011, 09:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Actually the big money seems to be producing the opposite effect, at least in baseball.

The average age of an MLB player continues to rise.

Two score and ten years ago a player who was 40 was exceedingly rare. Today it is quite common. </div></div>

This may be true, but do you have a cite for that?

Certainly I've noticed some 40-ish MLB players, even as a wholly disinterested person in baseball.

The training and nutrition these days is superior to what was around before, so people are extending their careers in ways that were impossible before. Is this really a trend, though? </div></div>

This from 2007:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Baseball players seem to hang around a lot longer these days. The average age of the historic 1927 New York Yankees was, fittingly, 27 years old. By the time Mickey Mantle arrived at Yankee Stadium in 1951, the average Yankee was now 28.5 years old. On the night Reggie Jackson hit three home runs in one World Series game, the team's mean age had surpassed 29. Today, the Bronx Bombers average a very ripe 31.1 years.

Read more at Suite101: Baseball's Over 40 All Star Team: The Best Middle Aged MLB Players http://www.suite101.com/content/baseballs-over40-all-star-team-a23419#ixzz1HX3WcgCq </div></div>
CREAK (http://www.suite101.com/content/baseballs-over40-all-star-team-a23419)

The hated New York Yankees spring roster is down to 29 players, 4 cuts to go. (http://yankees.mlb.com/team/roster_active.jsp?c_id=nyy)

A quick scan using year of birth only shows them to be 31.1 yrs old approx on average, and that is after being on a youth move and with the 4 cuts, likely to be younger less experienced players, to go.

Two that will be 40 or more, and three of age 35 or more before year's end ... all pretty much a lock to make the team.

Soflasnapper
03-24-2011, 06:39 PM
True enough ... but Larry also had to face a total of zero Cuban, Soviet, eastern bloc or Chinese boxers either.

Larry fought and beat everyone they put in front of him. But it was a lackluster bunch, and particularly lacking in anyone who could give him a showcase set of fights as a key rival. That, plus succeeding Muhammed Ali, meant that Larry's greatness was overlooked and underestimated.

I'm not sure who in the group you mention would have been favored to beat him at the time. There were some great Cuban amateurs who might as well have been professionals, but amateurs they still were. Even today, with those Klitschko brother heavyweights champs, Larry in his prime had more than enough to probably beat them. Chinese heavyweights? A new one on me.

Soflasnapper
03-24-2011, 06:47 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Actually the big money seems to be producing the opposite effect, at least in baseball.

The average age of an MLB player continues to rise.

Two score and ten years ago a player who was 40 was exceedingly rare. Today it is quite common. </div></div>

This may be true, but do you have a cite for that?

Certainly I've noticed some 40-ish MLB players, even as a wholly disinterested person in baseball.

The training and nutrition these days is superior to what was around before, so people are extending their careers in ways that were impossible before. Is this really a trend, though? </div></div>

This from 2007:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Baseball players seem to hang around a lot longer these days. The average age of the historic 1927 New York Yankees was, fittingly, 27 years old. By the time Mickey Mantle arrived at Yankee Stadium in 1951, the average Yankee was now 28.5 years old. On the night Reggie Jackson hit three home runs in one World Series game, the team's mean age had surpassed 29. Today, the Bronx Bombers average a very ripe 31.1 years.

Read more at Suite101: Baseball's Over 40 All Star Team: The Best Middle Aged MLB Players http://www.suite101.com/content/baseballs-over40-all-star-team-a23419#ixzz1HX3WcgCq </div></div>
CREAK (http://www.suite101.com/content/baseballs-over40-all-star-team-a23419)

The hated New York Yankees spring roster is down to 29 players, 4 cuts to go. (http://yankees.mlb.com/team/roster_active.jsp?c_id=nyy)

A quick scan using year of birth only shows them to be 31.1 yrs old approx on average, and that is after being on a youth move and with the 4 cuts, likely to be younger less experienced players, to go.

Two that will be 40 or more, and three of age 35 or more before year's end ... all pretty much a lock to make the team.
</div></div>

The Yankees are not a normal team with their tendency to go out and buy all-star talents. By the time a player is an established star, they're no longer in the early years of their career, but into the middle. Then they stick around, and get older still.

Sorta like how George Allen, the former Redskins coach, used to load up his team with (aged) all-pros, although he was cherry-picking the waiver wires more than getting them in their prime.

I would need to see a league-wide age accounting, rather than simply using the Yankees as representative (when I think they are not), to believe this age thing you say is true (or increasingly true).

Although the admitted increasing number of 40 yos would tend to boost the average age, of course.

LWW
03-25-2011, 04:11 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">True enough ... but Larry also had to face a total of zero Cuban, Soviet, eastern bloc or Chinese boxers either.

Larry fought and beat everyone they put in front of him. But it was a lackluster bunch, and particularly lacking in anyone who could give him a showcase set of fights as a key rival. That, plus succeeding Muhammed Ali, meant that Larry's greatness was overlooked and underestimated.

I'm not sure who in the group you mention would have been favored to beat him at the time. There were some great Cuban amateurs who might as well have been professionals, but amateurs they still were. Even today, with those Klitschko brother heavyweights champs, Larry in his prime had more than enough to probably beat them. Chinese heavyweights? A new one on me. </div></div>

None of us know who they were because of the statist's closed systems.

As for Chinese, Zhang Zhilei has been the best so far.

LWW
03-25-2011, 04:21 AM
Sorry, according to ESPN the Yanks are tied for sixth oldest team, with 6 teams having at least one 40+ ... and 28 of 30 teams having at least one 35+ player.

OH DEAR! (http://espn.go.com/mlb/stats/rosters/_/sort/null/order/false)

LWW
03-25-2011, 04:35 AM
Also, 16 pitchers have played at 40+.

Throw out Nick Altrock who pitched about a dozen games over 15 years. Altrock's last game was mid 40's, but he was a coach who would be sent in to mop up the last inning in blowout games or pitch an inning in mega inning games when they ran out of roster players.

Toss out Hod Lisenbee who pitched during WWII when real players were largely at war.

That leaves 14. Six of them pitched over 40 in the first 110 years of the professional game. Eight in the last 30.

Of the 12 post season games started by a 40+ pitcher, 10 have happened since 2005. Eleven have happened since1982.