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cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 02:31 AM
What iz the korrekt spelling for Kristianity.
Zombiizm??
Zombianity??

A branch of Voodoo.
Whodoo. Udoo.
mac.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 02:56 AM
And what about Pope Zombi the 1st.
And Saint Zombi.
God the Farter, God the Zombi, and God the Holey Spirits.
mac.

LWW
04-01-2011, 05:32 AM
http://mtpundit.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/obama-zombies-chaaaaange.jpg

hondo
04-01-2011, 07:32 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What iz the korrekt spelling for Kristianity.
Zombiizm??
Zombianity??

A branch of Voodoo.
Whodoo. Udoo.
mac. </div></div>

Actually, followers of voudon find many similarities between their beliefs and Catholicism.
OTOH, I see more similarities between voudon and Pentecostalism.

Soflasnapper
04-01-2011, 10:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What iz the korrekt spelling for Kristianity.
Zombiizm??
Zombianity??

A branch of Voodoo.
Whodoo. Udoo.
mac. </div></div>

No, those are not correct spellings. Good try though.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 04:42 PM
Oxford sez Zombie. And allso Jumby might be ok. And Zombiism. And Zomboid.

I seem to recall that some Roman Kathlicks go in for Voodoo (vaudoo, hoodoo, hoodooism).
mac.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 04:44 PM
Wiki.
Zombies are regularly encountered in horror and fantasy themed fiction and entertainment, appearing as early as the 1929 novel The Magic Island by William Seabrook. Time claimed that the book "introduced 'zombi' into U.S. speech".[9] As of 2009, zombies are challenging the vogue for vampires in pop culture.[10]
Wiki.
Zombie apocalypseMain article: Zombie apocalypse
The zombie apocalypse is a particular scenario of apocalyptic fiction that customarily has a science fiction/horror rationale. In a zombie apocalypse, a widespread (usually global) rise of zombies hostile to human life engages in a general assault on civilization. Victims of zombies may become zombies themselves. This causes the outbreak to become an exponentially growing crisis: the spreading "zombie plague/virus" swamps normal military and law enforcement organizations, leading to the panicked collapse of civilian society until only isolated pockets of survivors remain, scavenging for food and supplies in a world reduced to a pre-industrial hostile wilderness.

The literary subtext of a zombie apocalypse is usually that civilization is inherently fragile in the face of truly unprecedented threats and that most individuals cannot be relied upon to support the greater good if the personal cost becomes too high.[20] The narrative of a zombie apocalypse carries strong connections to the turbulent social landscape of the United States in the 1960s when the originator of this genre, the film Night of the Living Dead, was first created.[25][26] Many also feel that zombies allow people to deal with their own anxiety about the end of the world.[27] In fact the breakdown of society as a result of zombie infestation has been portrayed in countless zombie-related media since Night of the Living Dead.[13] One scholar concluded that "more than any other monster, zombies are fully and literally apocalyptic ... they signal the end of the world as we have known it."[13]

Due to a large number of thematic films and video games, the idea of a zombie apocalypse has entered the mainstream and there have been efforts by many fans to prepare for the hypothetical future zombie apocalypse. Efforts include creating weapons [28] and selling posters to inform people on how to survive a zombie outbreak.[29

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 04:45 PM
Horror story.
Apocolypse.
Zombie.
The Holey Bible haz it all.
mac.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 05:17 PM
Wiki.
Haitian VodouIn 1937, while researching folklore in Haiti, Zora Neale Hurston encountered the case of a woman who appeared in a village, and a family claimed she was Felicia Felix-Mentor, a relative who had died and been buried in 1907 at the age of 29. Hurston pursued rumors that the affected persons were given powerful psychoactive drug, but she was unable to locate individuals willing to offer much information. She wrote:

“ What is more, if science ever gets to the bottom of Voodoo in Haiti and Africa, it will be found that some important medical secrets, still unknown to medical science, give it its power, rather than gestures of ceremony.[3] ”

Several decades later, Wade Davis, a Harvard ethnobotanist, presented a pharmacological case for zombies in two books, The Serpent and the Rainbow (1985) and Passage of Darkness: The Ethnobiology of the Haitian Zombie (1988). Davis traveled to Haiti in 1982 and, as a result of his investigations, claimed that a living person can be turned into a zombie by two special powders being entered into the blood stream (usually via a wound). The first, coup de poudre (French: 'powder strike'), includes tetrodotoxin (TTX), a powerful and frequently fatal neurotoxin found in the flesh of the pufferfish (order Tetraodontidae). The second powder consists of dissociative drugs such as datura. Together, these powders were said to induce a death-like state in which the will of the victim would be entirely subjected to that of the bokor. Davis also popularized the story of Clairvius Narcisse, who was claimed to have succumbed to this practice.

The process described by Davis was an initial state of death-like suspended animation, followed by re-awakening—typically after being buried—into a psychotic state. The psychosis induced by the drug and psychological trauma was hypothesised by Davis to re-inforce culturally-learned beliefs and to cause the individual to reconstruct their identity as that of a zombie, since they 'knew' they were dead, and had no other role to play in the Haitian society. Societal reinforcement of the belief was hypothesized by Davis to confirm for the zombie individual the zombie state, and such individuals were known to hang around in graveyards, exhibiting attitudes of low affect. In 1988, Wes Craven, director of the Nightmare on Elm Street horror series of movies, filmed The Serpent and the Rainbow, which diverges significantly from the book.

Davis' claim has been criticized, particularly the suggestion that Haitian witch doctors can keep “zombies” in a state of pharmacologically induced trance for many years.[4] Symptoms of TTX poisoning range from numbness and nausea to paralysis (particularly of the muscles of the diaphragm), unconsciousness, and death, but do not include a stiffened gait or a death-like trance. According to psychologist Terence Hines, the scientific community dismisses tetrodotoxin as the cause of this state, and Davis's assessment of the nature of the reports of Haitian zombies is viewed as overly credulous.[5]

Scottish psychiatrist R. D. Laing highlighted the link between social and cultural expectations and compulsion, in the context of schizophrenia and other mental illness, suggesting that schizogenesis may account for some of the psychological aspects of zombification.[6]

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 05:18 PM
There is a curious incident recorded in the Gospels that may be explained by this hypothesis: while on the cross, Jesus complained that he was thirsty. A sponge soaked in vinegar was placed on the end of a long reed and held up to him. But far from reviving Jesus, the drink from this sponge apparently caused him to die. This is a curious reaction and suggests that the sponge was soaked not in vinegar, a substance that would have revived Jesus, but rather in something that would have caused him to lose consciousness—some sort of drug, for example. And there was just this type of drug available in the Middle East.

It was known that a sponge soaked in a mixture of opium and other compounds such as belladonna and hashish served as a good anesthetic. Such sponges would be soaked in the mixture, then dried for storage or transport. When it was necessary to induce unconsciousness—for surgery, for example—the sponge would be soaked in water to activate the drugs and then placed over the nose and mouth of the subject, who would promptly lose consciousness. Given the description of the events on the cross and the rapid apparent "death" of Jesus, it is a plausible suggestion that this use of a drugged sponge was the cause. No matter how carefully a "staged" crucifixion might have been carried out (one intended for Jesus to survive), there was no way to anticipate the effect that shock might have had upon him. Crucifixion was, after all, a traumatic experience, both physically and mentally. To be rendered unconscious would reduce the effect of the trauma and thus increase the chance of survival, so the drug would have been a further benefit in that regard too. (Michael Baigent, Could Jesus Have Survived the Crucifixion? [2]

According to John, Jesus from the cross complains of thirst. In reply, he is given a sponge allegedly soaked in vinegar. Rather than another act of cruelty, vinegar -- or soured wine -- is a temporary stimulant with the effects similar to smelling salts. As such, it was often used to resuscitate flagging slaves on galleys. For a wounded and exhausted man a sniff or taste of vinegar produces a restorative effect, a momentary surge of energy. And yet in Jesus' case, his reaction is to utter his last words and "give up the ghost", all of which is physiologically inexplicable.

On the other hand, his reaction would have been entirely consistent with a sponge soaked in something other than vinegar, such as belladonna or a soporific drug. Such drugs were common in the Middle East at the time, and would have constituted a stratagem designed to produce a semblance of death, and in the process save Jesus' life…

Perhaps the vinegar was not vinegar, but a drug to cause Jesus to appear dead. Concocted by an Essene herbalist-physician, the drug would be sufficiently powerful to induce almost total paralysis -- and in particular, near extinction of respiration and heartbeat. With Jesus apparently dead, there would be no reason to break his legs (an act which might have been imminent in order to allow the corpse to be taken down before Passover Sabbath, as required by Jewish Law). Simultaneously, one of Jesus' friends in high places could approach the authorities for permission to remove the body for burial to a nearby, spacious tomb (where in the coolness and privacy, hidden Essene physicians, armed with the appropriate antidote, could treat and revive their patient). [3]

pooltchr
04-01-2011, 05:25 PM
mac, I must admit that sometimes I think you may have just a little bit too much time on your hands.
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Steve

Soflasnapper
04-01-2011, 06:29 PM
mac, this is essentially the thesis of 'The Passover Plot' by Shoenfield, if I remember his name correctly. Haven't thought too much about it since the '70s.

The Moslems have a different theory, that Jesus was substituted on the cross, never got on it, never died that way, and never was resurrected.

Which sounds stupid until you remember the name of the guy, which most remember or see stated as Barrabas. His full name? JESUS BARRABAS. Bar Abbas = 'son of the father.'

So according to scripture, Jesus Barrabas (or, 'Jesus son of the father') was released by the acclaim of the people, per Pilate's clemency. Hmmm.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 07:29 PM
Yes i hav lots of books, inklooding The Passover Plot.
The most impressiv iz barbara thierings Jesus The Man.
The most astonishing iz The Jesus Scroll by donovan joyce.
Joyce reckons that we dont know the date of jesus' birth, but we know the date and place of death (April 15 73AD, masada), and the exakt date and place of burial (July 7 1969, bottom of roman ramp, masada).
mac.

cushioncrawler
04-01-2011, 08:18 PM
Anyhow, just koz jesus praps didnt die on the cross duznt mean He woznt a zombie, koz zombifikation kan inklood just simply drugging someone, ie a temp state of zombiizm.
mac.

LWW
04-02-2011, 05:55 AM
I've heard that swamp water can induce this malady.