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KalboKev
05-11-2011, 06:55 AM
It's still the most widely played pool game worldwide??? Extremely popular??? With that said, one would think 8-Ball would be sort of popular "format" for PRO tourneys? It's largely ignored, why??? 8-Ball is exciting. So many "choices" to make, most pivotal? Unlike 9/10 ball. It's HARD "navigating" the Cue ball around all that clutter. What's the most important ball on the table? The white one. Syempre! Tagalog for "of course"

pooltchr
05-11-2011, 10:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KalboKev</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> one would think 8-Ball would be sort of popular "format" for PRO tourneys? It's largely ignored, why???
</div></div>

Two words...
tee vee


Steve

JJFSTAR
05-11-2011, 04:18 PM
Yes TV is the biggest reason by far for a myriad of reasons. The first is probably the “crowd pleasing shots” that are obviously of great difficulty and very low percentage for even your average break n run league player. A good runner up is the sequential rule of the game. It makes it quite a bit easier for the commentator of the game, after all the player can only hit one ball this makes it very easy for a fellow pro to predict the course of action and make it very attractive for a TV sports like venue. And probably in 3rd place is that it is widely known that there are whole groups of professional players who have blasted 8ball as a legitimate game for them to compete in citing that its run out percentage is too high. This has created a large group of 9ball snobs in the general public as well. BTW most of those people don’t run a table of anything even once a month

pooltchr
05-11-2011, 04:46 PM
And yet, when the IPT came along, most of those professionals were ready to jump all over 8-ball. I know several pros who decided that getting some 8-ball coaching might be a good idea.

Funny how money does that to people.

Steve

JJFSTAR
05-12-2011, 06:23 AM
Now that is a really interesting little fact that I didn’t know. So do you not think that this is a legitimate gripe of pro players? What is the rough run out percentage of your touring pro in 8ball? Heck we have some “local unknowns” right here (not many but a few) who run an 8ball table a little more often than not. I am not talking about the few world class players we have I mean just a couple of the guys that play on the “super section” teams of the West Penn Pool League.

pooltchr
05-12-2011, 07:18 AM
The ones that I am aware of that did seek coaching, did it more for learning strategy than anything else. 8 Ball takes a completely different mindset than 9 ball. The cueing skills remain, but how you think about table layout, defense, patterns, etc is quite different.
As for the local run-out players, it's one thing to do it in your local tournaments, where you may feel that even if you make a mistake, you will still have the opportunity to get back to the table. When you are playing against world class players, one mistake can put you in the chair for a long time.
The pressure of playing at the highest level of the game is something nobody can know until they have experienced it. When it's all on the line, and you see a world champion across the table, it will have an impact on you. (In my case, it wasn't always pretty!)

Steve

KalboKev
05-12-2011, 07:43 AM
Some years ago, a rather old Filipino told me.. "Ya know, in 8 ball--if you are playing a good player, and you leave only one ball plus the 8, or just the 8. You probably just lost." It's TRUE! So many ways to snooker... Wide open. They are all "Ducks". Control the Cue ball, you win.

bluey2king
05-12-2011, 12:32 PM
After the Break in 8 ball there are lots time you do not have a run out rack. This is where it gets Beautiful IMHO, knowing how to break clusters and still have a good shot, when to play a safety because in this game you will need to is what makes Great!

Brian in VA
05-12-2011, 01:25 PM
I recall from the IPT that the average break and run percentage of all players was around 25% and that the best were in the 50% neighborhood. And these were the best players in the world.

I actually enjoyed watching them play the game. Seeing world class players play the game that I grew up with was very eye opening.

Brian in VA

Soflasnapper
06-15-2011, 12:53 PM
Quote I heard from Tony Robles:

"Let's face it-- at our level, 8-ball is a joke!"

Still, what I recall is that Bustamante had the best B&R percentage of anyone at about 37%, although that was IPT modified equipment (tighter pockets, slower cloth).

Even for those guys, the B&R doesn't happen the majority of the time, and not even close (on IPT's type tables, at least).

Sid_Vicious
06-15-2011, 01:03 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Quote I heard from Tony Robles:

"Let's face it-- at our level, 8-ball is a joke!"

Still, what I recall is that Bustamante had the best B&R percentage of anyone at about 37%, although that was IPT modified equipment (tighter pockets, slower cloth).

Even for those guys, the B&R doesn't happen the majority of the time, and not even close (on IPT's type tables, at least).
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I watched Spiderman run 3 of 4 straight racks of 8B during a company challenge event. It was pure art, well calculated and exact-on-target for shape. He ain't no pro, but that night, he was! Odd thing...he didn't blink much of an eye about it at the time. Me? I could count on one hand the number of times I've ran out in 8B. Some of the reason is because I now utilize lockup safes a lot more for preparation on future shots. I know that it sucks to run down to just one ball and miss(which most of us do overall), then get cut to pieces by being hidden on the last ball. A run out ain't worth it overall, but they are a pleasure when the rack unfolds just right. sid

Soflasnapper
06-15-2011, 03:18 PM
We let semi-pros play in our 8-ball league, and back when former Florida tour player and noted cuemaker Dennis Searing played, he generally ran out, and on complicated layouts at that, sometimes. True, mainly on 8-footers, but 9-footers as well.

A simpler game for some than others.

bradb
06-17-2011, 01:30 PM
If they put a shot clock on the game then it would make a good pro spectator sport.

JJFSTAR
06-17-2011, 02:24 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bradb</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If they put a shot clock on the game then it would make a good pro spectator sport. </div></div>

The IPT is without shot clocks???

bradb
06-17-2011, 03:34 PM
I've seen some players take up to 3-4 minutes studying the table. A shot clock would speed the game up. 9Ball has it, I think thats one of the reasons why its more popular.

Brad

JJFSTAR
06-18-2011, 10:42 AM
Huh I looked there is no shot clock you may be right.

bradb
06-18-2011, 11:19 AM
I think many players use it as a sharking technique. Theres a video of Archer and O'sullivan taking about 15 minutes to play one game... most of that time there was Ronnie staring at the table. Some argue that it takes a while to sort out your patterns, but I play the game and i can usually sort it out by 30 secs. A pro should have no trouble with that.

KalboKev
06-21-2011, 08:30 AM
Why don't "they" put a shot clock on 14.1 or one pocket??? It would make for a more fluid and commercial friendly "game"? Eight Ball is panned by the general public, it doesn't get much respect. It's too popular. It's a pattern game. Lot's of furniture to navigate around and arrange. I'd rather play 10 ball. NO slop, lots of open space to move the white around. Shot clocks are ONLY for TV. And I play nearly as quick as Rodney Morris or Tony Drago.

Even though I fully believe some players deliberately "slow play" to take their opponent out of rhythm. It's fair, part of the game, get into the other guys head. You just have to ignore the game, and once you get to the table, play at your own pace.

bradb
06-21-2011, 09:08 AM
14-1 and one pocket are specialty games appreciated by the people who play it, but their time consuming play makes them impossible for TV sports.

8ball does'nt have to be that way, it does'nt really require long stretches of study. If sharking by slow play is part of the game then why not remove the shot clock from 9Ball?

8Ball is the universal game that even non pool players understand and probably have even tried at one time.

My point is it maybe it could be appreciated more by TV with the rule change. TV is the only way we can ever make pool more popular and thats good for us all. Once that happens pro players will take an interest in it, money talks.

Brad

pooltchr
06-21-2011, 09:47 AM
Strange, but the reasons you listed that you don't like 8 ball are the very reasons I prefer it to 9 or 10 ball. I like having to navigate through the various blocking balls and different situations. Finding the right pattern to run a rack, and then executing it is very gratifying. I enjoy having to think and plan the patterns.
I guess that's why there are so many different pool games.

Steve