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03-01-2002, 09:44 PM
This is a very unique shot taught to me recently by a strong player who uses it beautifully, that I'm trying to eventually add to my arsenal. I'm just curious how many others here have heard of and/or utilized this shot from time to time?

The drag shot is used when you need to slow roll a ball on an angled shot, so that the cue-ball will stop as soon as possible for the next shot. You can do it on a straight shot as well for the same reason, but in that case it can be hit at a much harder pace and it's not nearly as impressive looking a shot as when there is an angle involved. The biggest advantage of the drag shot is that the cue ball is gliding across the top of the cloth (at a slow pace but without rotation) while on it's path to the object ball - thus minimizing the chances that the cue-ball will roll off due to an unlevel table - causing a miss. Pro level players (without the benefit of knowing the table roll) absolutely despise slow rolling a ball for this very reason.

The drag shot is accomplished by hitting low center on the cue-ball, but hitting at a fairly soft pace (and with follow thru). It can also be done with low right or low left, but one most be very familiar when doing it this way - as you have to be experienced enough with the shot to have accurately factored in draw, swerve, throw, etc. in to the aiming process.

To see a player use the drag shot effectively in the right situation is a real thing of beauty IMO, as I would call it one of the most advanced shots in the game. - Chris in NC

Tom_In_Cincy
03-01-2002, 09:57 PM
Chris.
This is a very popular shot in the Cincinnati area. I saw it for the first time about 13 years ago.
To see a player strike the cue ball with Draw on a cut shot and then see it hit the OB at the angle and then the CB almost stop.. or roll just slightly is amazing.
Its a shot all of us should be able to do. I really comes in handy when the cut shot is near the next ball is at the same end of the table.

JimS
03-01-2002, 10:44 PM
Is this a shot where the cb is hit with draw, the draw quits just before the cb hits the ob and then the cb just rolls slowly into the ob? I've thought of it as a "kill shot" but I learned this a year ago and use it in the same situations.

Cue ball slides with back spin, the back spin quits just inches before the cb rolls into the ob and the cb slows way down?....right? Never tried it with english but I'm heading to the table right now!

Love it! It's great fun to hit.

Regards, JimS.

Rod
03-01-2002, 11:07 PM
Hi Chris, yes itís a valuable stroke to know. Not just because a table rolls off but another way to kill whitie.
Your description is very good, as it does take a very
smooth stroke that glides through the cue ball with
a full follow through. Here is another example of why
follow through is important. By that I mean to be successful, this is not a shot that will let you hit at the cue ball, with a cut off follow through.

The best example IMO is the cue ball just starts to turn over as contact is made. This essentially makes it a dead ball used this way, if thatís desired.
Using english is a little tricky, but I think the key here is
to hold the cue as level as possible to help prevent,
swerve. Of course itís always going to exist to some degree.

I learned this stroke many years ago, more than I care to
admit to, playing Golf on a 12 footer. Anyone who wants
to play this game well must have this stroke in their bag.
The c/b may roll off easily over 3 inches, and never hit
the o/b. This can be real costly playing for the $ per hickey.
Not to mention a sell out costing you the game.
Itís the same type of stroke, but with a little more speed
which keeps the c/b on line. It does slow down, more than
people may think, and far better results than a slow roll.

Iím not sure where I would place it in terms of importance,
but it is a difficult stroke to master because of the smoothness of the stroke required. Pokers could learn
a lot by shooting this shot or similar.

03-01-2002, 11:15 PM
The "Drag" Shot ? I guess I misunderstood. There I stood in new red pumps,a skin tight lowcut black evening gown,pearls,my new blonde wig and my cue in my hand... I thought it said,"The Drag Queen Shot." oy-vey

03-01-2002, 11:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Smorgass Bored:</font><hr> The "Drag" Shot ? I guess I misunderstood. There I stood in new red pumps,a skin tight lowcut black evening gown,pearls,my new blonde wig and my cue in my hand... I thought it said,"The Drag Queen Shot." oy-vey <hr></blockquote>

Hey smorgass bored, Wrong post... from what I gather, that is the "Remember Renee Richards" post (lol)

Chris Cass
03-02-2002, 01:49 AM
Hi Chris,
I know this shot as the Kill shot and yes I use it quite often.
Regards,
C.C.

03-02-2002, 02:09 AM
A lot of times I hit this shot with just a little bit of inside english, a 1/4 tip or less. For me it seems to help kill the CB. I like the shot a lot especially when you are shooting a ball and playing position on another ball next to it but you may have a little too much angle,-it can really come in handy in those situationd.

Shawn

TonyM
03-02-2002, 02:28 AM
I first learned the drag shot on the Snooker table as a way to beat the nap on long shots, but still not lose the cue ball. I still use it on the pool table, but mostly to beat table roll, or cloth imperfections. And yes, it is a useful shot!

Another shot that you should add to your arsenal is what the Snooker players call the "stun-run-through". This is a follow shot (or more accurately natural roll) used when you want the cueball to roll a short distance forward (after striking an object ball) but you don't want to slow roll it (for similar reasons as the drag shot).

This shot is a real finesse shot as it is very sensitive to tip position and speed. And the results are often non-intuitive. For example, to get less roll after the collision, you can either strike the cueball slightly lower, or slightly harder. To get more roll, you can either strike slightly higher, or slightly slower.

For most players this seems a bit backwards as they are used to hitting faster to get more roll, and slower to get less!

But if you think about what is happening (faster gets the cueball to the object ball before it has time to develop more natural roll), then it makes sense.

Not an easy shot to master, but also very effective.

Tony

JimS
03-02-2002, 09:58 AM
Byrne talks about this shot in one of his tapes. I've used it.....in practice. When I'm playing a game hitting the cb hard enough to make the stun-run-through shot work just scares the pee-pee out of me and I usually don't try it because I know I MUST stop within an inch or two past the ob.

Obviously I need to work on the shot and build enough confidence to actually USE it.

Regards, JimS

Rip
03-02-2002, 01:18 PM
This shot is utilized frequently by most decent 1P players. Chris, do you play much one pocket? Rip~~draggin' on

03-02-2002, 03:15 PM
Rip, I guess it's obvious I don't play much one-pocket otherwise as you say I'd be very familiar with this shot. I've actually used the shot for years to kill the cue-ball on straight in or slightly angled longer shots (without slow rolling the cue-ball). I'd just never seen it executed so well even on fairly angled cut shots as I saw recently. My guess is that it's a frequently utilized shot among higher level snooker players as well, and that's probably where this particular player learned it. - Chris in NC

Rip
03-02-2002, 04:02 PM
You're right Chris. It's not a unique shot but to see it used correctly certainly is unique. I hit the shot frequently but I hit it "well" rarely. Rip

03-03-2002, 01:17 PM
It's unfamiliarity that breeds fear Jim. I must say I was once in the same boat as you. I would rather slow roll the shot with follow, than attempt a stun run-through with speed. Now the opposite is true! I cringe if I am forced to slow roll any ball at all. Anything could happen, it could roll-off due to table roll, or hit a lump of chalk or a cloth defect. I now get confidence from knowing that I can add some speed to a shot and still get the cue ball to "slow-roll" afterwards. Spend some time on the shot. It will eventually pay dividends.

Tony

Kato
03-04-2002, 12:36 PM
Jeez, a guy showed me that shot 4 years ago and I never thought it was a viable shot!!!!!!! Guess I'm gonna have to go back to that one if you guys say it's cool.

Kato~~~thinks maybe Jarvis wasn't drunk when he showed me that shot.

03-04-2002, 01:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: JimS:</font><hr>Byrne talks about this shot in one of his tapes. I've used it.....in practice. When I'm playing a game hitting the cb hard enough to make the stun-run-through shot work just scares the pee-pee out of me and I usually don't try it because I know I MUST stop within an inch or two past the ob<hr></blockquote>Jim, is Robert Byrne's stun-run-through when you force follow the cueball with a firm stroke and slight 'tops' when the cueball and object ball is mostly straight on? Whereas the 'drag' shot in this thread is talking about the 'kill shot' that I believe is mentioned in Byrne's Standard Book, where you use draw to kill the speed of the cueball and still get a good firm stroke without having to slow roll.

JimS
03-04-2002, 01:41 PM
Scott Lee showed me another shot that is useful in the same sort of situation. Just make a very short backswing, maybe an inch or two and then follow thru normally. It achieves the same affect. I must admit I'd forgotten about it until now but now it's written down and I will remember to work on it as well as the stun run-through.
Thanks, JimS

Fred Agnir
03-04-2002, 02:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris in NC:</font><hr> Pro level players (without the benefit of knowing the table roll) absolutely despise slow rolling a ball for this very reason... <hr></blockquote>
I think this can be said of most competent non-pros as well.

(snip drag draw at an angle description)



<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris A.:</font><hr>The drag shot is accomplished by hitting low center on the cue-ball, but hitting at a fairly soft pace (and with follow thru). <hr></blockquote>
For TomBrooklyn, others might say that this is hit relatively soft with a high spin/speed ratio.

Fred

03-04-2002, 03:07 PM
Hi Chris,

This shot has appeared in many, many billiard instruction books. The earliest that is still in print is probably Willie Hoppe's "Billiards As It Should Be Played."

If you're really interested in improving your game, you may want to start a library. There's much about this game in books that even top players are ignorant of.

Bob Jewett

Vince S.
03-04-2002, 11:41 PM
Chris, I have used this shot for many years. It was never taught to me, it just sort of seemed like the natural thing to do at the time. I have always refered to it as a Kill shot. And yes it is a devistating shot when played correctly. It's also a shot that you absolutely have to trust as your stroking it.

Your opponent can't imagine how your going to get position on the next ball without risking going up and down the table in all kinds of traffic. Then all of a sudden you stroke firm and low at about 7:30 and before they know what hit them, there you are, comfortably slow spining the cue ball off the back rail to the other side of the next ball! sorry Chris, I guess I got carried away. Anyhow, it's a shot that's worth every ounce of practice that you put into it.

Vince S.

jjinfla
03-05-2002, 09:32 AM
<font color=green>"This is one of the most critical shots in pool".</font color=green>
That's the way Ray Martin starts his explanation of "The Drag Draw Shot" on page 109 of his book "The 99 Critical Shots in Pool". It is shot #58.
I have been using it right along and thought it was a pretty easy and rewarding shot, but after hearing you all say how hard it is I probably won't be able to shoot it again. Not only have I read about this shot in Ray's book, but I have also watched him use it in tournament play. And Bob Jewett is right - a good pool library will provide a wealth of information. It surprises me that as popular that Ray's book is, more people weren't aware of this shot. Another shot in his book that has won many games for me is shot #17 - the double ball throw shot. Jake