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ugotda7
06-05-2011, 10:43 PM
http://biggovernment.com/kolson/2011/06/...argaining-dead/ (http://biggovernment.com/kolson/2011/06/05/tennessee-trumps-wisconsin-kills-teacher-collective-bargaining-dead/)

To fix public schools, you have to control public schools.

And thereís little control when teachers unions, with their self-serving agendas, question every cost-cutting proposal and reform on the table.

Thatís why so many state governments have taken swift action to limit the power of organized labor in public schools. Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Idaho and Michigan were the first, and Tennessee added itself to the list on Wednesday.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam affixed his signature on House Bill 130 and Senate Bill 113, ending collective bargaining and giving local school boards the full authority to operate their districts in the manner they choose.

pooltchr
06-06-2011, 06:31 AM
Hmmmmm Seems to be a trend going here. Maybe there really is something to the idea of communities taking back control of how their schoos are run.

Who would have thought???


Steve

Sev
06-06-2011, 12:31 PM
Everyday I am happier I moved out of NY.

pooltchr
06-06-2011, 02:09 PM
Life in the "flyover states" is pretty good!

Steve

Soflasnapper
06-06-2011, 10:24 PM
Replacing it with 'collaborative conferencing'?

That should work out well.

Gayle in MD
06-07-2011, 08:57 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Replacing it with 'collaborative conferencing'?

That should work out well. </div></div>

The FACTS show, the stronger the Teachers Unions, the higher the educational standards, and student performance.

As we well know, Repiglicans don't value educating, our children, any more than they value feeding them when they are going to bed hungry.

One in four, are hungry, or as Bush and the blank check Repiglicans liked to call it, Food Challenged. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

pooltchr
06-07-2011, 09:28 AM
You throw out one comment about union teachers that you can't back up, and then you completely change the subject to food!

What does one have to do with the other?

But back to the topic...unions do not make for better teachers. Unions make for better paid teachers, with lower standards.

Steve

Gayle in MD
06-07-2011, 09:45 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: pooltchr</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You throw out one comment about union teachers that you can't back up, and then you completely change the subject to food!

What does one have to do with the other?

But back to the topic...unions do not make for better teachers. Unions make for better paid teachers, with lower standards.

Steve </div></div>


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <span style='font-size: 11pt'>Thereís only been one scholarly effort to tackle this problem that Iím aware of. Back in 2000, three professors writing in the Harvard Educational Review did a statistical analysis of state SAT/ACT scores, controlling for factors like race, median income, and parental education. They found that the presence of teachers unions in a state did have a measurable and significant correlation with increased test scores ó that going to school in a union state would, for instance, raise average SATs by about 50 points.

Two other findings leap out from the Harvard Educational Review study. First, they concluded that Southern statesí poor academic performance could be explained almost entirely by that regionís lack of unionization, even when you didnít take socioeconomic differences into account.

And second, and to my mind far more interesting, they found that concrete improvements in the educational environment associated with teachersí unions ó lower class sizes, higher state spending on education, bigger teacher salaries ó accounted for very little of the union/non-union variation. Teachersí unions, in other words, donít just help students by reducing class sizes or increasing educational spending. In their conclusion, they stated that

ďother mechanism(s) (ie, better working conditions; greater worker autonomy, security, and dignity; improved administration; better training of teachers; greater levels of faculty professionalism) must be at work here.Ē

To sum up:

Yes, Wisconsin has great schools, with great outcomes. Yes, states without teachersí unions lag behind. Yes, that lag persists even when you control for demographic variables. Yes, that difference seems to rest less on the quantifiable resources that unions fight to bring to the classroom than on the professionalism, positive working environment, and effective school administration that unions foster.

And yes, Virginia, (and Texas, Georgia, and North and South Carolina) unions do work.



</span> </div></div>

http://studentactivism.net/2011/02/21/te...n-union-states/ (http://studentactivism.net/2011/02/21/teachers-unions-actsat-and-student-performance-is-wisconsin-out-ranking-the-non-union-states/)