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bradb
06-11-2011, 10:36 AM
Its not often that an article on pool has actually helped my game as much as this one did that I read in Professor Q-Ball's Mag.

"Blacking Out" means we are distracted by our awareness of the fact we are performing. Its causes us to be lose focus and not play in stay in the "exact present moment." We must ignore what has happened or what we think might happen at the table.

I had just been blown away the day befor in my first match down in Vegas and was down a bit so it was very timely read when I found it. It really helped me to regroup and get my mind set for my second match.

Go to page 22 for the article, I think you will enjoy it.

-Brad


http://issuu.com/professorqball/docs/pqbfebmar_reduced_size

Fran Crimi
06-12-2011, 07:32 AM
Hi Brad,

I had a heck of a time trying to get it to enlarge and it finally worked just as I was about to give up. He discusses two things in the article: Staying in the present moment and what he calls blacking out.

I agree that staying in the present is vitally important. That is a sports psychologist's mantra to any athlete. Back in the 70's, Billie Jean King used to tell everyone that was her secret to her success on the court.

As for blacking out, I think there are more causes for that than the self-consciousness that leads to performance anxiety. There are also players who tend towards laziness and don't like to work. It comes out in their games, even when they're just practicing and not under any pressure to perform.

JoeW
06-12-2011, 11:25 AM
Several years ago, when I was trying to figure out why I was missing some shots it occurred to me that I was literally closing my eyes (blinking) on some shots. This is similar to a loss of mental focus. I found that I could stop this momentary loss of concentration by telling myself to see the cue ball make contact with the object ball. While this seems like a simple thing to do it requires full concentration to see the actual physical contact. The mind cannot wander if you are intent on seeing the cue ball roll up to and make contact with the OB.

The only problem I have with it now is that, at times, a loss of concentration at contact creeps in and I am not aware of it for a few missed shots. It seems that this is most likely to happen when I am playing with a non-competitive opponent. The kind of person who says he “doesn’t care” wrecks my game. The person who is playing sloppy pool tends to drag me down and I start playing sloppy too.

Qtec
06-13-2011, 05:05 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The kind of person who says he “doesn’t care” wrecks my game. The person who is playing sloppy pool tends to drag me down and I start playing sloppy too. </div></div>

Wish I had a $ for every time I have heard that excuse.

Rule No 1.[ for competition/tournament play.]

If your opponent can affect your game through his game then you have already lost.

Q

Qtec
06-13-2011, 05:15 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> As for blacking out, I think there are more causes for that than the self-consciousness that leads to performance anxiety.</div></div>

How about ego? /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

To be a top player you have to be able to play in the moment. Its a must.
The great players excel in this level of intense concentration because its combined with physical relaxation. A relaxed player with total focus on the ball he is shooting. Its the way it should be.

Who cares what the opponent does?

What does that have to do with my objective which is playing my game?



Q

Qtec
06-13-2011, 06:13 AM
BTW, its easy when there are no distractions.

years ago....link (http://www.absrotterdam.nl/demo.htm)
Q

cushioncrawler
06-13-2011, 03:23 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: JoeW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Several years ago, when I was trying to figure out why I was missing some shots it occurred to me that I was literally closing my eyes (blinking) on some shots. This is similar to a loss of mental focus. I found that I could stop this momentary loss of concentration by telling myself to see the cue ball make contact with the object ball. While this seems like a simple thing to do it requires full concentration to see the actual physical contact. The mind cannot wander if you are intent on seeing the cue ball roll up to and make contact with the OB.

The only problem I have with it now is that, at times, a loss of concentration at contact creeps in and I am not aware of it for a few missed shots. It seems that this is most likely to happen when I am playing with a non-competitive opponent. The kind of person who says he “doesn’t care” wrecks my game. The person who is playing sloppy pool tends to drag me down and I start playing sloppy too.</div></div>Joe -- I will havta try a fixed gaze (again). Together with freezing everything else, untill the shot iz over.

I went well for a while some time back by concentrating on the qball (during the stroke) rather than on the objektball. This helped my kontrol of pace i remember.
mac.

JoeW
06-13-2011, 11:19 PM
Life is not always about excuses. Some things are more in the way of explanations. Sometimes we play with friends for the socialization and the pleasure of their company: A friendly game of pool if you will. During these times one is not attempting to play their best during every shot. In fact, I cannot think of any place in my life where I have always done my absolute best every time I stepped to the plate.

bradb
06-14-2011, 06:56 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Fran Crimi</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I agree that staying in the present is vitally important. That is a sports psychologist's mantra to any athlete. Back in the 70's, Billie Jean King used to tell everyone that was her secret to her success on the court. </div></div>

Hi Fran, thanks for the reply.

I think I remember an old interview with Billy Jean where she mentioned how she was able to keep her composure in that scary Bobbly Riggs match because of her ability to not think about the crowd, the noise or Riggs and just make each shot as it came over the net.

Staying in the moment sounds so simple yet its one of the hardest things to do in sports. If Greg Norman couuld have done that he would have won the Masters and the Open.

Brad

SpiderMan
06-24-2011, 01:16 PM
I can't seem to make this readable. Initially it's too small, but when I use the magnifier icon to enlarge it, the resolution is so poor that it's too pixellated to read.

SpiderMan

bradb
06-26-2011, 11:13 AM
Don't know why its not working, but then I'm on a Mac and completely ignorant about PC's. Try this link its more direct.



http://issuu.com/professorqball/docs/professor-q-ball/1

SpiderMan
06-27-2011, 08:35 AM
Works fine for me using that link. But the article on page 22 is titled "Team USA Heading to Manilla". I think the issue you originally referenced has been updated now. Is there a way to get back to a specific prior issue?

SpiderMan

bradb
06-28-2011, 09:57 AM
This is a different site, its a better link and has the original story.

http://professorqball.com/?p=487

SpiderMan
06-28-2011, 04:04 PM
Read it, thanks!

SpiderMan