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View Full Version : How Long To Become A BCA Master Instructor



TomBrooklyn
09-18-2002, 01:15 AM
What is the minimum time required to become BCA Master Instructor certified for an expert player starting from scratch with the BCA? Is the minimum time the same as the realistic time? =TB=

Scott Lee
09-18-2002, 01:23 AM
Tom...Regardless of ability, you must become certified first. I believe that is typically a 3-day class...I'm not sure why it can't be done in one day! Then you have teach a minimum of a dozen students a year, for two years, before you can apply for advanced certification. After you pass that test, you have to be advanced for two years, and help teach with other Master Instructors. They also want you to try to publish something about teaching. So, it is a bare minimum of 4 yrs., on the fast track, to get to be a Certified Master Instructor.

Scott Lee

09-18-2002, 11:03 AM
Then another 2 years of ass kissin on the CCB and you can be a Master-Bator like scott

Voodoo Daddy
09-18-2002, 05:59 PM
There's downtown...making friends again...LMFAO!!

griffith_d
09-18-2002, 07:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: d0wnt0wn:</font><hr> Then another 2 years of ass kissin on the CCB and you can be a Master-Bator like scott <hr></blockquote>

You must be in love with Scott

Griff

09-18-2002, 07:57 PM
no its you i want griff

Troy
09-18-2002, 08:09 PM
Leave it alone "dumbdown". You beat this to death in another thread.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: d0wnt0wn:</font><hr> Then another 2 years of ass kissin on the CCB and you can be a Master-Bator like scott <hr></blockquote>

Sid_Vicious
09-18-2002, 08:42 PM
Tom...I have to ask, "Why would it be desirable to be a BCA MA?" I know several and some are worthy opponents, some are decent instructors but rarely do you find any kind of balance between the two. To answer your question(Scott already did though), it's kind of like a fraternity,,,you pay some MA by being a free helper and kissin' a little butt. To tell the truth I had no idea it took 4 years! I ask again, "Why would it be desirable to be a BCA MA?" Seriously, you wanna make money as an instructor? Otherwise I haven't a clue why it's that important...sid

09-18-2002, 09:31 PM
Scott, I would have thought you knew better, but regardless it is certainly not nearly as easy as attending a 3 day course in order to become certified. A 3 day course at an accredited BCA pool school (led by a master instructor) as well as paying a BCA instructor program application fee earns you recognized instructor status with the BCA.

A minimum of 2 years later and keeping a certain number of students (requiring a specified minimum number of feedback forms from these students) over that 2 year period earns you the right to attend another pool school. Only then may you apply for your certified instructor status.

Another 2 years of teaching and attending additional schools as an assistant instructor working under a master instructor and you've got a shot at advanced instructor status. Finally, another 2 years of the same including instructing and supervising a considerable number of instructor candidates earns you the right to apply for the title of master instructor.

That totals a minimum of 6 years required to obtain master instructor status, of which there are currently around 10 active in the U.S. Also interesting to note is that it's apparently not that easy to keep any of the 3 levels of instructor titles (certified, advanced and master) unless you stay active teaching students, and in the case of advanced and master levels training instructors as well. To my understanding, there have previously been and will likely in the future be more instructors at all levels that run the risk of being demoted due to their teaching inactivity and not obtaining the necessary requirements and feedback forms to keep that title - as it should be.

If he happens to read this thread, perhaps Randy G can add to add to it or correct me if I'm wrong. - Chris in NC

TomBrooklyn
09-18-2002, 11:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> "Why would it be desirable to be a BCA MA?" I know several and some are worthy opponents, some are decent instructors but rarely do you find any kind of balance between the two. you wanna make money as an instructor? <hr></blockquote>I wasn't asking for myself, Sid. I couldn't be an instructor. I need an instructor if anything, lol.

I was talking to a pro player Tuesday night at the Platinum Billiards Weekly Tournament who teaches a lot and the subject of BCA Master Status came up. He was under the impression it took 8 years which seemed like a long time, so thats why I asked. I suppose 8 years is not unrealistic though, if six years is the absolute minimum.

He expressed a similar opinion that some BCA instructors are not very strong players, and he felt he had an advantage over some in teaching by being able to perform at an advanced level as well as teach; but he didn't seen to feel it was worth the time and expense to get certified. Just his opinion.

Scott Lee
09-19-2002, 12:31 AM
Chris...I would like to hear from Randy on this. As far as I know, you do NOT have to have "recognized" status to acquire basic certification. I may be wrong, and things may have changed, but it certainly didn't use to be that way. It's been several years since I had any interaction with committees.

Scott Lee

09-19-2002, 07:47 AM
Tom, as far as being required to be a strong player to become an effective instructor, I'd have to disagree with that premise. Of course what you refer to as a strong player may be different than my perception of a strong player - which to me is being capable of running out at least 50% of the time when coming to the table following the break with a spread rack and a decent shot on the first ball.

Yes, certainly a master instructor would have to be a good player and have full understanding of all aspects of the game to teach effectively. However, for many that I know, their game's are a bit rusty because their real priority, passion, effort and time commitment is in teaching - not in their own performance. This is as it should be, and to expect them to be real strong players I don't think is very realistic.

I know what you're saying though, and there are likely many students out there that once they become as good as or better than their instructor, they may lose the respect that this person can still effectively help them to further improve their game. If this is a hangup for a student, then likely they will need to seek out a better player - if just for their own peace of mind.

Bottom line - most pool lovers are gifted in one or the other - teaching or playing. With noted exceptions, IMO most of your really, really good players are too self absorbed with their own games to have the patience or interest to be able to effectively teach players of various levels. JMHO - Chris in NC

09-19-2002, 03:03 PM
I think Chris is correct.....randyg

Scott Lee
09-20-2002, 03:44 AM
Randy...Wow! How long ago did that change?

Scott