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Qtec
08-26-2011, 06:41 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Only 2% of welfare applicants in Florida failed drug tests.

Florida's nascent drug testing program for welfare recipients has been in effect for just over a month, and already it is representing a significant cost to the state.

The law requires that those applying for welfare take a drug test at their own personal expense. The payoff is simple: if the test is clean, the welfare application advances and the state reimburses the applicant for the test. If the applicant tests positive for drug use, they don't qualify for aid and they are not reimbursed.

The exact number of tests taken and their result is still being tabulated by the Department of Children and Families, but Tampa Bay Online reported that at least 1,000 tests had been taken for welfare applications between mid-July and mid-August.

Ninety-six percent of the tests were clean, 2 percent didn't complete the application process for unspecified reasons and only 2 percent of the applicants tested positive for drug use.

Using the estimation of 1,000 tests, that means only 20 people failed their tests. The 960 people whose tests were clean represent $28,800 in reimbursements from the state, along with the cost of the welfare benefits they were paid an average of $134 per month.

Assuming that 20 to 30 people fail the test per month, in a year the money saved on all rejected applicants would add up to $40,800 to $60,000. State analysts predict the welfare program will cost $178 million this fiscal year.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) rationalized the drug testing by saying that there is a higher rate of drug use among welfare recipients than the general population.

However, recent data from U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services showed that in the population above 12 years old, 8.7 percent use illicit drugs, and 6.3 percent of people 26 and older use drugs, compared to the demonstrated 2 percent of welfare recipients in Florida.</span>

The pattern also held true when analyzing data from only the central Florida region: only two of 40 tests administered were positive for drug use, and one of those tests is being appealed.

Derek Newton, spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, said that <u>the low failure rate for the tests only reinforced the false stereotype that poor people abuse drugs.</u>

"This is just punishing people for being poor, which is one of our main points," he said. "We're not testing the population at-large that receives government money; we're not testing people on scholarships, or state contractors. So why these people? It's obvious-- because they're poor."
</div></div>

link (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/08/25/only-2-of-welfare-applicants-in-florida-failed-drug-tests/)

Q

LWW
08-26-2011, 07:53 AM
So the test has made 98% of welfare applicants stay clean for at least 30 days.

That is a beautiful thing.

eg8r
08-26-2011, 08:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Only 2% of welfare applicants in Florida failed drug tests.

</div></div>Well considering there is an increased percentage of people on welfare now that they lost their jobs you might want to look into the 2% and tell us which group they came from, the long time welfare people or the newly added. I don't have any idea how that research will turn out but I think it is important to make sure that if you are receiving welfare then you are drug free, no questions asked.

eg8r

Gayle in MD
08-26-2011, 09:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Only 2% of welfare applicants in Florida failed drug tests.

Florida's nascent drug testing program for welfare recipients has been in effect for just over a month, and already it is representing a significant cost to the state.

The law requires that those applying for welfare take a drug test at their own personal expense. The payoff is simple: if the test is clean, the welfare application advances and the state reimburses the applicant for the test. If the applicant tests positive for drug use, they don't qualify for aid and they are not reimbursed.

The exact number of tests taken and their result is still being tabulated by the Department of Children and Families, but Tampa Bay Online reported that at least 1,000 tests had been taken for welfare applications between mid-July and mid-August.

Ninety-six percent of the tests were clean, 2 percent didn't complete the application process for unspecified reasons and only 2 percent of the applicants tested positive for drug use.

Using the estimation of 1,000 tests, that means only 20 people failed their tests. The 960 people whose tests were clean represent $28,800 in reimbursements from the state, along with the cost of the welfare benefits they were paid an average of $134 per month.

Assuming that 20 to 30 people fail the test per month, in a year the money saved on all rejected applicants would add up to $40,800 to $60,000. State analysts predict the welfare program will cost $178 million this fiscal year.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) rationalized the drug testing by saying that there is a higher rate of drug use among welfare recipients than the general population.

However, recent data from U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services showed that in the population above 12 years old, 8.7 percent use illicit drugs, and 6.3 percent of people 26 and older use drugs, compared to the demonstrated 2 percent of welfare recipients in Florida.</span>

The pattern also held true when analyzing data from only the central Florida region: only two of 40 tests administered were positive for drug use, and one of those tests is being appealed.

Derek Newton, spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, said that <u>the low failure rate for the tests only reinforced the false stereotype that poor people abuse drugs.</u>

"This is just punishing people for being poor, which is one of our main points," he said. "We're not testing the population at-large that receives government money; we're not testing people on scholarships, or state contractors. So why these people? It's obvious-- because they're poor."
</div></div>

link (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/08/25/only-2-of-welfare-applicants-in-florida-failed-drug-tests/)

Q

</div></div>
Scott is one of the most corrupt repiglican Governors in the country.

This is nothing but a scam, for his corporate cronies, which will fill his own pockets, much like the no bid Halliburton/ Carlyle/Blackwater Bush/Cheney no bid crony contracts in Iraq.

"My understanding is that the Iraq War is about oil"

Alan Greenspan....

That's right Alan, and Cheney's ability to manipulate Bush's cowboy grudge against Saddam for supposedly trying to assassinate his Da Da. Oh, but didn't Da Da, REagam and their cronies originally proop Saddam up?

YEP!

This scam in Florida, is as unconstitutional as all of the other RW Governor scams across the country, as well as Capital Hill Repiglican scams against Planned Parenhood, women's rights, to abortion, Birth controll Access, Destroying the rights of Union members, and Unions in general, as they continue to move the country closer to RW Repiglican fascism. why do they want to destroy PBS?

Because it is among the most well documented reporting of and exposure of their filthy, common, illegal policies.

Friedman was as fascist as they come, as the Shock Doctrine, proves, beyond a shadow of a doubt, all the way back to Reagan, and Margaret Thatcher....

G.

Gayle in MD
09-14-2011, 10:04 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Only 2% of welfare applicants in Florida failed drug tests.

Florida's nascent drug testing program for welfare recipients has been in effect for just over a month, and already it is representing a significant cost to the state.

The law requires that those applying for welfare take a drug test at their own personal expense. The payoff is simple: if the test is clean, the welfare application advances and the state reimburses the applicant for the test. If the applicant tests positive for drug use, they don't qualify for aid and they are not reimbursed.

The exact number of tests taken and their result is still being tabulated by the Department of Children and Families, but Tampa Bay Online reported that at least 1,000 tests had been taken for welfare applications between mid-July and mid-August.

Ninety-six percent of the tests were clean, 2 percent didn't complete the application process for unspecified reasons and only 2 percent of the applicants tested positive for drug use.

Using the estimation of 1,000 tests, that means only 20 people failed their tests. The 960 people whose tests were clean represent $28,800 in reimbursements from the state, along with the cost of the welfare benefits they were paid an average of $134 per month.

Assuming that 20 to 30 people fail the test per month, in a year the money saved on all rejected applicants would add up to $40,800 to $60,000. State analysts predict the welfare program will cost $178 million this fiscal year.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) rationalized the drug testing by saying that there is a higher rate of drug use among welfare recipients than the general population.

However, recent data from U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services showed that in the population above 12 years old, 8.7 percent use illicit drugs, and 6.3 percent of people 26 and older use drugs, compared to the demonstrated 2 percent of welfare recipients in Florida.</span>

The pattern also held true when analyzing data from only the central Florida region: only two of 40 tests administered were positive for drug use, and one of those tests is being appealed.

Derek Newton, spokesman for the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, said that <u>the low failure rate for the tests only reinforced the false stereotype that poor people abuse drugs.</u>

"This is just punishing people for being poor, which is one of our main points," he said. "We're not testing the population at-large that receives government money; we're not testing people on scholarships, or state contractors. So why these people? It's obvious-- because they're poor."
</div></div>

link (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/08/25/only-2-of-welfare-applicants-in-florida-failed-drug-tests/)

Q

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<span style='font-size: 20pt'> We must destroy Repiglican Fascism before it's too late!</span>

LWW
09-15-2011, 02:30 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Just reading this forum, is proof of the moronic views of the left.

G.

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