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LWW
08-30-2011, 04:41 AM
From the office of Big Brother,

Komrades and komradettes ... it has come to the party's attention that there are rogue elements loose in our communal society who deny that religion has oppressed science and it's advancement.

I am here today to set the record straight.

First off, we all know that the church fought to repress genetic science by ... huh ... what's that ... the science of genetics was founded by Gregor Johann Mendel, an Augustinian friar.

Never mind then we will proceed with the next example.

LWW
08-30-2011, 04:44 AM
From the office of Big Brother,

Komrades and komradettes ... it has come to the party's attention that there are rogue elements loose in our communal society who deny that religion has oppressed science and it's advancement.

I am here today to set the record straight.

We all know that the Big Bang Theory has proven the natural existence of the universe and that religion has fought against this theory since ... what's that ... the Big Bang Theory was developed by Monsignor Georges Henri Joseph Édouard Lemaître, a Belgian priest. Huh! Others in the field of physics opposed the BBT as non science, because it required a miracle, until Edwin Hubble's research proved it out.

Very well then ... we will get them with my next example!

LWW
08-30-2011, 04:50 AM
From the office of Big Brother,

Komrades and komradettes ... it has come to the party's attention that there are rogue elements loose in our communal society who deny that religion has oppressed science and it's advancement.

I am here today to set the record straight.

We are well aware that it was the church that insisted upon keeping people in the belief that the Earth was at the center of the universe and that science proved that and that ... what ... oh no, not again ... you mean Nicolaus Copernicus was a priest also?

WHAT!

Einstein later proved that the Earth was at the center of the universe also?

On then to final victory we march!

LWW
08-30-2011, 04:53 AM
From the office of Big Brother,

Komrades and komradettes ... it has come to the party's attention that there are rogue elements loose in our communal society who deny that religion has oppressed science and it's advancement.

I am here today to set the record straight.

Well I have been assured that the faithful troglodytes have done all within their power to block study of the human genome and ... you don't say ... this is getting ridiculous ... get another spoon in here as this one is clearly defective ... the human genome project was led by Francis Collins, a believer in <span style='font-size: 14pt'>GOD!</span>

LWW
08-30-2011, 04:54 AM
<s>From the office of Big Brother,

Komrades and komradettes ... it has come to the party's attention that there are rogue elements loose in our communal society who deny that religion has oppressed science and it's advancement.

I am here today to set the record straight.</s>

This series of studies has been cancelled until the party provides new "TRUTH" fit for dissemination.

cushioncrawler
08-30-2011, 06:40 AM
At original publication, Copernicus' epoch-making book caused only mild controversy, and provoked no fierce sermons about contradicting Holy Scripture. It was only three years later, in 1546, that a Dominican, Giovanni Maria Tolosani, denounced the theory in an appendix to a work defending the absolute truth of Scripture.[87] He also noted that the Master of the Sacred Palace (i.e., the Catholic Church's chief censor), Bartolomeo Spina, a friend and fellow Dominican, had planned to condemn De revolutionibus but had been prevented from doing so by his illness and death.[88]

Arthur Koestler, in his popular book The Sleepwalkers, asserted that Copernicus' book had not been widely read on its first publication.[89] This claim was trenchantly criticised by Edward Rosen,[90] and has been decisively disproved by Owen Gingerich, who examined every surviving copy of the first two editions and found copious marginal notes by their owners throughout many of them. Gingerich published his conclusions in 2004 in The Book Nobody Read.[91]

It has been much debated why it was not until six decades after Spina and Tolosani's attacks on Copernicus's work that the Catholic Church took any official action against it. Proposed reasons have included the personality of Galileo Galilei and the availability of evidence such as telescope observations.

In March 1616, in connection with the Galileo affair, the Roman Catholic Church's Congregation of the Index issued a decree suspending De revolutionibus until it could be "corrected," on the grounds that the supposedly Pythagorean doctrine[92] that the Earth moves and the Sun does not was "false and altogether opposed to Holy Scripture."[93] The same decree also prohibited any work that defended the mobility of the Earth or the immobility of the Sun, or that attempted to reconcile these assertions with Scripture.

On the orders of Pope Paul V, Cardinal Robert Bellarmine gave Galileo prior notice that the decree was about to be issued, and warned him that he could not "hold or defend" the Copernican doctrine.[94] The corrections to De revolutionibus, which omitted or altered nine sentences, were issued four years later, in 1620.[95]

In 1633 Galileo Galilei was convicted of grave suspicion of heresy for "following the position of Copernicus, which is contrary to the true sense and authority of Holy Scripture,"[96] and was placed under house arrest for the rest of his life.

The Catholic Church's 1758 Index of Prohibited Books omitted the general prohibition of works defending heliocentrism,[97] but retained the specific prohibitions of the original uncensored versions of De revolutionibus and Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems. Those prohibitions were finally dropped from the 1835 Index.[98]

LWW
08-30-2011, 04:41 PM
So your point is that Copernicus wasn't oppressed nor his works?

I concur.

That some disagreed is hardly evidence of oppression.

Soflasnapper
08-30-2011, 05:10 PM
It's not surprising that educated people are the ones who have made scientific advancements.

Evidently, it is surprising to you that many of the people with an education sufficient to do scientific experiments (and the free time with which to perform them) were from the clergy in some form or another, and particularly so the further in time is considered.

Just as it escaped pseudo-historian Barton's attention that when he mentioned all of the founding fathers who had attended 'seminary,' that was so because ALL of the schools WERE SEMINARIES. A place to get an education, quite apart from studying for priesthood or the ministry, even if religious education was also offered.

So while this construction of yours has amusement value (perhaps), it is not a telling point of much if any weight.

cushioncrawler
08-30-2011, 05:12 PM
The church etc oppressed hiz science. To be fair to the church the church did not dig up hiz remains and give hiz remains a fair trial and then burn hiz remains at the stake. But there iz yet time.
mac.

"......Copernicus died in Frauenburg (Frombork) on 24 May 1543. Legend has it that the first printed copy of De revolutionibus was placed in his hands on the very day that he died, allowing him to take farewell of his life's work. He is reputed to have awoken from a stroke-induced coma, looked at his book, and then died peacefully......"