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LWW
08-30-2011, 04:59 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">We'll start with a $100 dollar bill. Currently the largest U.S. denomination in general circulation. Most everyone has seen them, slightly fewer have owned them. Guaranteed to make friends wherever they go.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pHqd8DhbdUE/TdXCEmhaPdI/AAAAAAAAAUU/aIVsEYOAIJE/s320/trillion1.jpg
</div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">A packet of one hundred $100 bills is less than 1/2" thick and contains $10,000. Fits in your pocket easily and is more than enough for week or two of shamefully decadent fun.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-yRvlZM7Z2UE/TdXCLqwK6oI/AAAAAAAAAUY/WcmXMLDotPY/s320/trillion2.jpg

</div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:01 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Believe it or not, this next little pile is $1 million dollars (100 packets of $10,000). You could stuff that into a grocery bag and walk around with it.
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-KSLE1HMHyq0/TdXCRP-R88I/AAAAAAAAAUc/6c-OnLyr41g/s1600/trillion3.jpg </div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:02 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">While a measly $1 million looked a little unimpressive, $100 million is a little more respectable. It fits neatly on a standard pallet...
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0DjFPDdgSOs/TdXCVmoBJdI/AAAAAAAAAUg/grjiSYYc5SA/s320/trillion4.jpg </div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:02 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">And $1 BILLION dollars... now we're really getting somewhere...
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-NdiasS_-L-E/TdXCajtyPHI/AAAAAAAAAUk/PaglLefVcbQ/s320/trillion5.jpg </div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:04 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Next we'll look at ONE TRILLION dollars. This is that number we've been hearing so much about. What is a trillion dollars? Well, it's a million million. It's a thousand billion. It's a one followed by 12 zeros.
You ready for this?
It's pretty surprising.
Ladies and gentlemen... I give you $1 trillion dollars...
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WlCKZJfOYpM/TdXChUoEGMI/AAAAAAAAAUo/L7ILTVszCaM/s640/trillion_one_trillion.jpg
Notice those pallets are double stacked.
...and remember those are $100 bills.
So the next time you hear someone toss around the phrase "trillion dollars"... that's what they're talking about. </div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:05 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">***UPDATED***
This is what our current national debt looks like- $15 Trillion!!!
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-t69NgYroHyE/TkM5J5AIL8I/AAAAAAAAAXk/LeP8d8EYBas/s1600/15+trillion+of+100+dolla+bills+ya%2527ll.jpg </div></div>

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:06 AM
OH DEAR! (http://athousandpointsofresistance.blogspot.com/2011/05/what-does-one-trillion-dollars-look.html)

Qtec
08-30-2011, 05:57 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">We'll start with a $100 dollar bill. Currently the largest U.S. denomination in general circulation. Most everyone has seen them, slightly fewer have owned them. Guaranteed to make friends wherever they go.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pHqd8DhbdUE/TdXCEmhaPdI/AAAAAAAAAUU/aIVsEYOAIJE/s320/trillion1.jpg
</div></div> </div></div>

This whole debt thing is a distraction, its all a red herring to shift the focus from their crimes. The crime of the century has been committed but nobody talks about it, not even the supposed LW media!
They do it all the time and spoon fed guys like you lap it up.

The reason for the crisis <u>all around the world</u> is that the banks sold shit and made a fortune on it. Govts around the world have been left holding the bag.
After saying sorry and promising to work with the Govt if they got bailed out, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>they go and FORGE documents in order to foreclose on people and throw they out of their house! Another crime.</span>



Q

LWW
08-30-2011, 06:12 AM
You forgot to add that they backed Obama and he has hired a literal boatload of them.

Thanks also for the flattery of copying my lines trying to make yourself look smart.

Qtec
08-30-2011, 06:32 AM
..but...but...but...OBAMA!

Q...LOL

Soflasnapper
08-30-2011, 05:33 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">***UPDATED***
This is what our current national debt looks like- $15 Trillion!!!
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-t69NgYroHyE/TkM5J5AIL8I/AAAAAAAAAXk/LeP8d8EYBas/s1600/15+trillion+of+100+dolla+bills+ya%2527ll.jpg </div></div> </div></div>

You ought to show a breakout of the approx. 70% or more of this amount that was amassed for military spending, war spending, and then taking care of the veterans in various ways.

Meaning only 30% of the pile was amassed for deficit spending in all other categories combined.

LWW
08-30-2011, 05:41 PM
You ought to explain how you came up with such a ridiculous claim?

Soflasnapper
08-30-2011, 06:59 PM
Reading.

As in:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Finding out how much of the government’s net interest payments on the publicly held national debt ought to be attributed to past debt-funded defense spending requires a considerable amount of calculation. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>I added up all past deficits (minus surpluses) since 1916 (when the debt was nearly zero), prorated according to each year’s ratio of narrowly defined national security spending—military, veterans, and international affairs—to total federal spending, expressing everything in dollars of constant purchasing power. This sum is equal to 67.6 percent of the value of the national debt held by the public at the end of 2009.</span> Therefore, I attribute that same percentage of the government’s net interest outlays in that year to past debt-financed defense spending. The total amount so attributed comes to $126.3 billion. </div></div>

From "Defense Spending is Much More Than You Think.' (http://blog.independent.org/2010/04/17/defense-spending-is-much-greater-than-you-think/)

The author makes the point that, for example, the part of the Dept of Energy that handles nukes for the military is really part of the spending for military matters, as is the VA spending, etc.

Or, just look at the national debt from 1916, as he says, and review the added debt associated with war time.

Soflasnapper
08-30-2011, 07:10 PM
Or there's this, in more detail about the wars and the debt increases:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> In fact, the five major wars that the United States fought throughout the 20th century, in addition to the Reagan’s escalation of the Cold War, were reflected in the five major hikes in the national debt.

In 1900, there was a relatively small national debt of about $2.13 billion that slowly grew until it reached about $5.71 billion in 1917. Then, it jumped to about $14.59 billion in 1918, in response to World War I military spending. In 1942, the year America entered World War II, the national debt was $72.42 billion. But it jumped to about $136.69 billion in the following year and continued to increase until it reached about $269.42 billion, in 1946. While the third war, in Korea, did not lead to a large increase in the national debt, it kept it at a higher level than during World War II. In 1954, a year following the end of the Korean War, the national debt reached about $278.74 billion despite the post-war economic prosperity. The fourth war, in Vietnam, contributed to doubling the national debt. In 1975, the year the war ended, the national debt reached about $576.64 billion (Table3). Despite these steady increases, the national debt was very little in comparison to the unbelievable increases during the Reagan, Bush Sr., and Clinton administrations. By the end of the Carter administration, in 1980, the national debt reached $930.21 billion. However, by the end of the Reagan administration, in 1988, the national debt increased to about $2.602 trillion.

The trend continued during the Bush administration so that in 1992, the year Bush left the White House, the national debt reached about $4.064 trillion. It is obvious that the 1980-1992 drastic Cold War arms race, during the Reagan and Bush administrations, was the prime factor that led to the outrageous increase of the national debt from less than $1 trillion at the end of the Carter’s administration to more than $4 trillion at the end of the Bush administration. The continuous high military spending during the Clinton administration caused the national debt to reach about $5.724 trillion by March 2000 (Table 3). </div></div>

cushioncrawler
08-30-2011, 07:18 PM
15 trillion iz probly aboout what theusofa gov owes the injuns for the use of injun lands all theze years, inklooding interest. Even if they "giv" the lands back.
Foreclosing on injuns = shooting women and children.
The constitution iz real, but theusofa iz a forgery.

The injuns shood start a dialogue with china. China hav a better human rights rekord than theusofa.
mac.

LWW
08-31-2011, 04:04 AM
Sorry dude ... but it was the Euros that took the land from native Americans ... much as the did to the residents of the Indian subcontinent ... and of Australia ... and of South America ... and of Africa ... and of Asia ... and of the Island nations.

cushioncrawler
08-31-2011, 05:08 PM
Sorry to hijak the debt thread. On the other hand, if u added the injun wars then that 67.6% might go up to well over 100%, ie koz it woz so long ago, ie adding interest.
mac.

LWW
09-01-2011, 01:50 AM
So if the USA would have had no national defense we would have no national debt?

I am no longer surprised by how you come up with such illogical conclusions.

Soflasnapper
09-01-2011, 10:35 AM
Not exactly, and not at all, to be most accurate.

I'll try to use smaller words so you can understand it better.

Your question might be a more reasonable claim of what is implied by what I posted, IF, I say IF, I had said "**100%** of the national debt comes from military and its related spending."

As I did not say that, and rather said it was accountable for about 70% of the national debt, a more factually correct implication of what I said was that we'd have about **30%** of the debt we see today. As the debt is in the trillions, and 30% of this sum would still be in the trillions, my statement isn't anything close to YOUR OWN illogical conclusion.

Finally, this wasn't really a point about 'national defense,' but military spending for wars, that often had little or nothing to do with 'national defense.' (WW I, the Korean War, Vietnam, the Iraq wars (I and II), etc.) After the fall of the Soviet Union's empire, I'd put NATO spending in the same category of not being 'national defense' as well. Military spending not for national defense.