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silverbullet
09-20-2002, 05:40 PM
in my last lesson, i was told that the hard shot is when there is a big distance between the cb and the ob. this seems to be not true for me.it is the pocket that psychs me out.i dont know what bad tapes my mind is saying but if i can see the whole pocket, it is downhill.

i can hit cb on one end and ob at other end of 8 or 9 foot table and even make a hard cut shot. if the cb is at one end and the ob is close, say 2-3 feet away, and i see that big pocket at the end,i cannot even see if i am lined up right or if it is straight.it is like i see too many possibilities to the pocket and throw, english, which one how much etc relating to getting the ball in the pocket fly through my mind all at once (only exception is am okay on rails).there cant be anything wrong with my eyes because when the ob is at the other end i see it just fine and just hit it with the cb and lots of times it goes in,even 70-80+cuts.

my brain is doing a real bad number on me when i look at that whole pocket and not sure what to do to stop it.

i know i have said some dumb stuff and especially those here who are really good probably think this is read dumb,just hoping somebody here has some ideas that will help me get past this.i practice everyday and some stuff people have pointed out wrong with my game and am trying to fix those but this has me stumped.

btw, this is bluewolf,thought i was logged in as bw but goofed.

bw

heater451
09-20-2002, 06:50 PM
You can try just looking at the pocket, to 'verify' where it 'is', and then use the rail as a guide to base your aim angle from.

Basically, what you do is realize that you **know** where the pocket is, and you **know** where the aimpoint is on the object ball to make the pocket, so all you have to do is send the object ball along an imaginary line to the pocket 'area'. The rail is just a guide to 'lock' your perception of table in your head. The deal is that, if the target is 'locked', then you only have to concentrate on hitting the cue ball correctly, so that it hits the object ball correctly.

You may already be doing something similar, when you shoot the rail. The big difference is, you are picturing the ball travelling along the rail (parallel, or roughly parallel), for a 'rail-shot', whereas the 'cut-shot' requires you to hit the ball on an intersect path to the rail (the pocket).

If this is still confusing, you might understand the concept by doing something like throwing a paper ball into a basket across the room, without looking directly at the basket. You're peripherial vision is only a little help, you will have to rely on your memory and spatial relations abilities to determine exactly where and how hard to throw. ~~This may work better for right-brained individuals.



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bluewolf
09-21-2002, 09:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: heater451:</font><hr> You can try just looking at the pocket, to 'verify' where it 'is', and then use the rail as a guide to base your aim angle from.

Basically, what you do is realize that you **know** where the pocket is, and you **know** where the aimpoint is on the object ball to make the pocket, so all you have to do is send the object ball along an imaginary line to the pocket 'area'. The rail is just a guide to 'lock' your perception of table in your head. The deal is that, if the target is 'locked', then you only have to concentrate on hitting the cue ball correctly, so that it hits the object ball correctly.

You may already be doing something similar, when you shoot the rail. The big difference is, you are picturing the ball travelling along the rail (parallel, or roughly parallel), for a 'rail-shot', whereas the 'cut-shot' requires you to hit the ball on an intersect path to the rail (the pocket).

If this is still confusing, you might understand the concept by doing something like throwing a paper ball into a basket across the room, without looking directly at the basket. You're peripherial vision is only a little help, you will have to rely on your memory and spatial relations abilities to determine exactly where and how hard to throw. ~~This may work better for right-brained individuals.



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<hr></blockquote>

thanks for the suggestions. it is really weird.like you say the rail is already lined up.i have had aiming problems in other sports like rifle target practice.it is a little related to my eyes and eye muscle focus problem when having to focus long and short in the same shot and having left eyed dominance, but that should be a minor thing.most of it has to do with my head, i am sure.also, the same shots i cant line up straight,if ww lines them up straight i can shoot them in or can shoot in if a slight cut instead of straight.

thanks again

Laura

09-21-2002, 09:24 AM
Two thoughts come to mind; visualization and slower eye movement.

I found that visualizing the shot before I ever go down on the table made a huge improvement in my pocketing percentage. If you mentally see the path of the CB to the OB and the OB to the pocket, it emphasizes to the brain exactly what you plan to accomplish. In my case, it also helped pinpoint some aiming problems. Try it in a few practice sessions and see it if help/feels right for you.

Since you mentioned eye problems and focusing speed, have you tried slowing down your eye movement. If you focus slowly but your eye movement is fast, you may never be getting a clear picture of the shot you intent to make. Perhaps if you were more deliberate in in your eye movement from CB to pocket to OB, etc. etc. the picture would become clearer and your accuracy may improve.

Just some thoughts...your mileage may vary. Good luck.

WaltVA
09-21-2002, 11:53 AM
BW, on the long cut shots that you make it sounds to me like you are picking out a contact point on the OB and concentrating on it, switching focus back and forth between CB and OB.

On the shots giving you trouble, you may be switching focus between CB, OB, and pocket. Try lining up the shot,picking out the contact point on the OB and then absolutely disregarding everything but that contact point. DO NOT look back at the pocket to "verify" the line or contact point; just concentrate on the contact point and where you are going to stroke the CB to get it there. Just a thought - HTH

Walt in VA

bluewolf
09-22-2002, 07:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: WaltVA:</font><hr>

On the shots giving you trouble, you may be switching focus between CB, OB, and pocket. Try lining up the shot,picking out the contact point on the OB and then absolutely disregarding everything but that contact point. DO NOT look back at the pocket to "verify" the line or contact point; just concentrate on the contact point and where you are going to stroke the CB to get it there. Just a thought - HTH

Walt in VA
<hr></blockquote>

i really like the ideas of visualization and not looking at the pocket so much.after my lesson with scott, we have been going back and forth about how to adapt to the sometimes severe hand tremors I have,using the fact that I am ambidextrous and considering switching to left hand shooting, since my left tremmor is not nearly as bad.

then i discovered this problem with lining up the balls for a straight in shot, which i wrote about here.

last night i tried shooting exclusively leftie.scott worked for hours to correct my right handed stroke, follow through,bridge and he did not like my stance,which was a modified karate backstance.even after my lesson with scott, i have been having to practice my stroke every day to make sure i am following through enough.it still isnt completely automatic as i was still having to concentrate on it. he also taught 4 ball speeds. i could do all but the fast, break speed. i have been working on that too and getting closer to the goal.the straight in ball in hand drill he taught i absolutely could not line up but could get them in if ww lined them in.

anyway when i shot leftie,i noticed several things.i always did correct followthrough on my stroke without thinking.i stood in a traditional pool stance, which is totally different than my right,this is just the natural stance for left handed pool.my bridge, i was able to hike up the bridge when i needed to to get higher on the cb, which i could not do at all when shooting rightie.on my left, i have to move my feet some to get alignment as i am not used to shooting left except when i couldnt reach the shot with my right.

it was really frustrating, knowing i had the potential to shoot as a 3-4 or so and keep getting stuck as a two. so i spent 3 years playing right handed and now will be starting as a leftie.i guess at first i will not be quite as good of a two, but that is okay.if i kept shooting righty with my weird stance on that side and my right eye not being able to focus well,i might have never gotten past a three. who knows. today i begin a new adventure as a leftie with all of your excellent suggestions in my hip pocket.

thanks

bw