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View Full Version : The truth about 'class war' in America



Qtec
09-20-2011, 05:06 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Republicans claim, in Orwellian fashion, that Obama's millionaire tax is 'class war'. The reality is that the super-rich won the war.

Republicans and conservatives always fight back against proposals to raise taxes on corporations and rich individuals by making two basic claims. First, such proposals amount to un-American "class warfare", pitting the working class against corporations and the rich. Second, such proposals would take money for the government that would otherwise have been invested in production and thus created jobs.

Neither logic nor evidence supports either claim. The charge of class war is particularly obtuse. Consider simply these two facts. First, at the end of the second world war, for every dollar Washington raised in taxes on individuals, it raised $1.50 in taxes on business profits. Today, that ratio is very different: for every dollar Washington gets in taxes on individuals, it takes 25 cents in taxes on business. In short, the last half century has seen a massive shift of the burden of federal taxation off business and onto individuals.

Second, across those 50 years, the actual shift that occurred was the opposite of the much more modest reversal proposed this week by President Obama; over the same period, the federal income tax rate on the richest individuals fell from 91% to the current 35%. Yet, Republicans and conservatives use the term "class war" for what Obama proposes and never for what the last five decades have accomplished in shifting the tax burden from the rich and corporations to the working class.

The tax structure imposed by Washington on the US over the last half-century has seen a massive double shift of the burden of taxation: from corporations to individuals and from the richest individuals to everyone else. If the national debate wants seriously to use a term like "class war" to describe Washington's tax policies, then the reality is that the class war's winners have been corporations and the rich. Its losers the rest of us now want to reduce our losses modestly by small increases in taxes on the super-rich (but not, or not yet, on corporations) </div></div>

read on (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/sep/19/class-war-america-republicans-rich)

Spot on.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The final irony of <u>loose talk about class war</u> is this: <span style='font-size: 14pt'>the Republican and conservative voices opposing all tax increases for corporations and the rich thereby provoke,</span> as Buffett intimated and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg more explicitly warned last week,<span style='font-size: 14pt'> a renewal of class consciousness in the US. Then, Washington might learn what class war really is.</span> </div></div>

A bunch of millionaire politicians say higher taxes on millionaires are bad for the country !!!!..and some saps actually believe them?

Q

cushioncrawler
09-20-2011, 05:41 PM
http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e366/goofst3r/kh-goofy-halloween.jpg

Gayle in MD
09-21-2011, 08:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Republicans claim, in Orwellian fashion, that Obama's millionaire tax is 'class war'. The reality is that the super-rich won the war.

Republicans and conservatives always fight back against proposals to raise taxes on corporations and rich individuals by making two basic claims. First, such proposals amount to un-American "class warfare", pitting the working class against corporations and the rich. Second, such proposals would take money for the government that would otherwise have been invested in production and thus created jobs.

Neither logic nor evidence supports either claim. The charge of class war is particularly obtuse. Consider simply these two facts. First, at the end of the second world war, for every dollar Washington raised in taxes on individuals, it raised $1.50 in taxes on business profits. Today, that ratio is very different: for every dollar Washington gets in taxes on individuals, it takes 25 cents in taxes on business. In short, the last half century has seen a massive shift of the burden of federal taxation off business and onto individuals.

Second, across those 50 years, the actual shift that occurred was the opposite of the much more modest reversal proposed this week by President Obama; over the same period, the federal income tax rate on the richest individuals fell from 91% to the current 35%. Yet, Republicans and conservatives use the term "class war" for what Obama proposes and never for what the last five decades have accomplished in shifting the tax burden from the rich and corporations to the working class.

The tax structure imposed by Washington on the US over the last half-century has seen a massive double shift of the burden of taxation: from corporations to individuals and from the richest individuals to everyone else. If the national debate wants seriously to use a term like "class war" to describe Washington's tax policies, then the reality is that the class war's winners have been corporations and the rich. Its losers the rest of us now want to reduce our losses modestly by small increases in taxes on the super-rich (but not, or not yet, on corporations) </div></div>

read on (http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/cifamerica/2011/sep/19/class-war-america-republicans-rich)

Spot on.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The final irony of <u>loose talk about class war</u> is this: <span style='font-size: 14pt'>the Republican and conservative voices opposing all tax increases for corporations and the rich thereby provoke,</span> as Buffett intimated and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg more explicitly warned last week,<span style='font-size: 14pt'> a renewal of class consciousness in the US. Then, Washington might learn what class war really is.</span> </div></div>

A bunch of millionaire politicians say higher taxes on millionaires are bad for the country !!!!..and some saps actually believe them?

Q

</div></div>

And we have ten years of undeniable proof, that tax cuts for corporations, millionaires and billionaires, do not produce JOBS.

Knuckle dragging neanderthals, that we will have to once again, drag kicking and screaming into the future.

G.