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View Full Version : OBAMA REGIME: No jobs were saved or created.



LWW
10-14-2011, 03:49 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Old and busted: Jobs “saved or created.” New hotness: Jobs “supported.” In attempting to advance the argument for Barack Obama’s new jobs stimulus plan, the White House has decided to create a new term that has, er, even less meaning than their previous measure:

The American Jobs Act Will Support Nearly 400,000 Education Jobs—Preventing Layoffs and Allowing Thousands More to Be Hired or Rehired: The President’s plan will more than offset projected layoffs, providing support for nearly 400,000 education jobs—enough for states to avoid harmful layoffs and rehire tens of thousands of teachers who lost their jobs over the past three years.

How exactly did the White House come up with its new metric? Chuck Blahous gives us a detailed analysis of exactly how they crafted this measure to be, well, unmeasurable:

To start the process of estimating educator jobs at risk, the Administration refers to a June, 2011 paper by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (a left-of-center think tank). This paper quantifies recent and projected shortfalls in state budgets.

The Administration then makes various assumptions about how the projected shortfalls would be filled. In effect, they assume first that shortfalls would be filled by a combination of tax increases and spending reductions, and then that spending cuts would be applied proportionally across all categories including education. As the Administration materials state, “These spending reduction numbers were then converted into estimates of educator jobs at risk based on estimates of average teacher compensation by state. These calculations implied that, if spending reductions had their full negative impact on education staffing, up to 280,000 educator jobs across the country would be at risk in the 2011-2012 school year.”

The Administration then points to $30 billion in spending contained in the proposed American Jobs Act. The purpose of this spending, as specified in the bill text, is to “prevent teacher layoffs and support the creation of additional jobs in public early childhood, elementary, and secondary education in the 2011-12 and 2012-13 school years.” </div></div>

OH MY ... HOW EMBARRASSING! (http://hotair.com/archives/2011/10/13/new-obama-metric-jobs-supported/)

Soflasnapper
10-14-2011, 05:57 PM
An embarrassing false thread title, agreed.

Evidently they were tired of being beaten up on the saved/created numbers, and are simply changing how they refer to the same effects.

Nobody in the O 'regime' has stated there were no jobs saved or created. They continue to say what CBO said, or various blue chip economists have said, about that number.

A slightly more true headline from you would be to say they now say no jobs will BE saved or created from the new jobs program, although that is also false. Just changed what they're calling it.

eg8r
10-14-2011, 06:20 PM
This is the same reason why they do everything they can to never refer to taxes. Instead they rely on the ignorance of public education and call it "revenue" knowing the overwhelming majority of voters don't know they are referring to the same thing. Obama knows those that voted for him are basically lacking a great deal of intelligence so he is pandering to their stupidity.

eg8r

Soflasnapper
10-14-2011, 06:43 PM
You realize the government receives revenue from things other than taxes, right?

cushioncrawler
10-14-2011, 07:01 PM
Revenue
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In business, revenue is income that a company receives from its normal business activities, usually from the sale of goods and services to customers. In many countries, such as the United Kingdom, revenue is referred to as turnover. Some companies receive revenue from interest, dividends or royalties paid to them by other companies.[1] Revenue may refer to business income in general, or it may refer to the amount, in a monetary unit, received during a period of time, as in "Last year, Company X had revenue of $42 million." Profits or net income generally imply total revenue minus total expenses in a given period. In accounting, revenue is often referred to as the "top line" due to its position on the income statement at the very top. This is to be contrasted with the "bottom line" which denotes net income.[2]

For non-profit organizations, annual revenue may be referred to as gross receipts.[3] This revenue includes donations from individuals and corporations, support from government agencies, income from activities related to the organization's mission, and income from fundraising activities, membership dues, and financial investments such as stock shares in companies.

In general usage, revenue is income received by an organization in the form of cash or cash equivalents. Sales revenue or revenues is income received from selling goods or services over a period of time. Tax revenue is income that a government receives from taxpayers.

In more formal usage, revenue is a calculation or estimation of periodic income based on a particular standard accounting practice or the rules established by a government or government agency. Two common accounting methods, cash basis accounting and accrual basis accounting, do not use the same process for measuring revenue. Corporations that offer shares for sale to the public are usually required by law to report revenue based on generally accepted accounting principles or International Financial Reporting Standards.

In a double-entry bookkeeping system, revenue accounts are general ledger accounts that are summarized periodically under the heading Revenue or Revenues on an income statement. Revenue account names describe the type of revenue, such as "Repair service revenue", "Rent revenue earned" or "Sales".[4]

[edit] Business revenue
Business revenue is income from activities that are ordinary for a particular corporation, company, partnership, or sole-proprietorship. For some businesses, such as manufacturing and/or grocery, most revenue is from the sale of goods. Service businesses such as law firms and barber shops receive most of their revenue from rendering services. Lending businesses such as car rentals and banks receive most of their revenue from fees and interest generated by lending assets to other organizations or individuals.

Revenues from a business's primary activities are reported as sales, sales revenue or net sales. This includes product returns and discounts for early payment of invoices. Most businesses also have revenue that is incidental to the business's primary activities, such as interest earned on deposits in a demand account. This is included in revenue but not included in net sales.[5] Sales revenue does not include sales tax collected by the business.

Other revenue (a.k.a. non-operating revenue) is revenue from peripheral (non-core) operations. For example, a company that manufactures and sells automobiles would record the revenue from the sale of an automobile as "regular" revenue. If that same company also rented a portion of one of its buildings, it would record that revenue as “other revenue” and disclose it separately on its income statement to show that it is from something other than its core operations.

[edit] Financial statement analysis
Main article: Financial statement analysis
Revenue is a crucial part of financial statement analysis. A company’s performance is measured to the extent to which its asset inflows (revenues) compare with its asset outflows (expenses). Net Income is the result of this equation, but revenue typically enjoys equal attention during a standard earnings call. If a company displays solid “top-line growth,” analysts could view the period’s performance as positive even if earnings growth, or “bottom-line growth” is stagnant. Conversely, high income growth would be tainted if a company failed to produce significant revenue growth. Consistent revenue growth, as well as income growth, is considered essential for a company's publicly traded stock to be attractive to investors.

Revenue is used as an indication of earnings quality. There are several financial ratios attached to it, the most important being gross margin and profit margin. Also, companies use revenue to determine bad debt expense using the income statement method.

Price / Sales is sometimes used as a substitute for a Price to earnings ratio when earnings are negative and the P/E is meaningless. Though a company may have negative earnings, it almost always has positive revenue.

Gross Margin is a calculation of revenue less cost of goods sold, and is used to determine how well sales cover direct variable costs relating to the production of goods.

Net income/sales, or profit margin, is calculated by investors to determine how efficiently a company turns revenues into profits....

[edit] Government revenue
Main article: Government revenue
Government revenue includes all amounts of money (i.e. taxes and/or fees) received from sources outside the government entity. Large governments usually have an agency or department responsible for collecting government revenue from companies and individuals.[6]

Government revenue may also include <span style='font-size: 14pt'>reserve bank currency which is printed.</span> This is recorded as an advance to the retail bank together with a corresponding currency in circulation expense entry. The income derives from the Official Cash rate payable by the retail banks for instruments such as 90 day bills. There is a question as to whether using generic business based accounting standards can give a fair and accurate picture of government accounts in that with a monetary policy statement to the reserve bank directing a positive inflation rate. The expense provision for the return of currency to the reserve bank is largely symbolic in that to totally cancel the currency in circulation provision all currency would have to be returned to the reserve bank and cancelled.

eg8r
10-14-2011, 07:54 PM
You do realize that when the government is referring to their "revenues" and trying to get the rich to cover it they are referring to ONLY taxes, right? LOL, maybe you are exactly the type of person I was describing in my first post.

eg8r

LWW
10-15-2011, 08:01 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You realize the government receives revenue from things other than taxes, right? </div></div>

Such as?

LWW
10-15-2011, 08:03 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">An embarrassing false thread title, agreed.

Evidently they were tired of being beaten up on the saved/created numbers, and are simply changing how they refer to the same effects.

Nobody in the O 'regime' has stated there were no jobs saved or created. They continue to say what CBO said, or various blue chip economists have said, about that number.

A slightly more true headline from you would be to say they now say no jobs will BE saved or created from the new jobs program, although that is also false. Just changed what they're calling it. </div></div>

So they aren't saying that no jobs were saved or created, they are actually saying that no jobs were saved or created.

Gotcha.

Soflasnapper
10-15-2011, 12:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You do realize that when the government is referring to their "revenues" and trying to get the rich to cover it they are referring to ONLY taxes, right? LOL, maybe you are exactly the type of person I was describing in my first post.

eg8r </div></div>

Depends upon what you are describing as 'taxes,' and depending upon the baseline law in effect. The baseline tax law in effect has the Bush tax rate cuts expiring in full after their two-year extension, since they were only temporarily (for a 10-year period) put in place originally.

A lot, maybe most, of what is being asked for is trimming down of the approx. $1.4 TRILLION in annual tax EXPENDITURES, spending disguised as current or future tax BREAKS in the tax code.

Soflasnapper
10-15-2011, 12:37 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You realize the government receives revenue from things other than taxes, right? </div></div>

Such as? </div></div>

So at least YOU have no idea that this is so? Interesting, but hardly surprising.

Soflasnapper
10-15-2011, 12:42 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">An embarrassing false thread title, agreed.

Evidently they were tired of being beaten up on the saved/created numbers, and are simply changing how they refer to the same effects.

Nobody in the O 'regime' has stated there were no jobs saved or created. They continue to say what CBO said, or various blue chip economists have said, about that number.

A slightly more true headline from you would be to say they now say no jobs will BE saved or created from the new jobs program, although that is also false. Just changed what they're calling it. </div></div>

So they aren't saying that no jobs were saved or created, they are actually saying that no jobs were saved or created.

Gotcha. </div></div>

Do you have a high school diploma, or a GED?

Hard to believe you are this dense, and I almost doubt you are, but then there's this whole history of your posting to the contrary point.

If you have the slightest interest, go to the OMB website, or the WH website, or Treasury, to find how they CONTINUE to describe the 'saved and created' numbers of jobs from the prior stimulus' effects. They made that claim in the past, and continue to make it.

Now, GOING FORWARD, they have pivoted to a different characterization of what is exactly the same thing, as a matter of poll-tested language, more likely than not.

If they were asked what 'jobs supported' means, they'd reply, 'jobs saved or created.'

Your ESL status betrays you once again, failing to understand very basic turns of phrases and what they actually mean.

LWW
10-15-2011, 12:52 PM
If you claim it, where's your link?