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LWW
11-18-2011, 04:49 AM
By state fiat ... water is no longer capable of hydrating the human body. If you produce potable water and claim it to hydrate the human body you are subject to up to 2 years in prison.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">THE EU was ridiculed last night after it took three years to issue a new rule that water cannot be sold as healthy.

In a scarcely believable ruling, a panel of experts threw out a claim that regular water consumption is the best way to rehydrate the body.

The bizarre diktat from Brussels has far-reaching implications for member states, including Britain, as no water sold in the EU can now claim to protect against dehydration.

Any producer breaching the order, signed by European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, faces being jailed for up to two years. It took the 21 scientists on the panel three years of analysis into the link between water and dehydration to come to their extraordinary conclusion.

The euro is burning, the EU is falling apart and yet here they are, highly paid, highly pensioned officials trying to deny us the right to say what is patently true.

Last night the decision of the European Food Safety Authority’s panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was labelled “beyond parody”. Ukip’s deputy leader Paul Nuttall, who sits on the European Parliament’s Public Health Committee, said: “I had to read this four or five times before I believed it.

“It is a perfect example of what the EU does best and makes the bendy banana law look positively sane.”

Conservative MEP Roger Helmer said: “The euro is burning, the EU is falling apart and yet here they are, highly paid, highly pensioned officials trying to deny us the right to say what is patently true."

“If ever there were an episode which demonstrates the folly of the great European project then this is it.”
A spokesman for the Department of Health said: “Of course water hydrates. While we support the EU in preventing false claims about commercial products, we need to exercise common sense as far as possible.”

German professors Dr Moritz Hagenmeyer and Dr Andreas Hahn, of the Institute for Food Science and Human Nutrition at Hanover Leibniz University, applied for approval for the seemingly uncontentious claim that “regular consumption of significant amounts of water can reduce the risk of development of dehydration”. However, bureaucrats refused to back them.

After a meeting in Italy a delegation of scientists concluded that reduced water content in the body was a symptom of dehydration rather than a risk factor that drinking water could control. Now their verdict has been turned into a regulation that will become UK law by December 6 and is bound to send shockwaves through the soft drinks industry. </div></div>

MOONBATTERY TAKEN TO A NEW LEVEL (http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/284426/EU-says-water-is-not-healthy)

eg8r
11-18-2011, 09:02 AM
Examples like this one show us too much government is never a good idea.

eg8r

Soflasnapper
11-18-2011, 08:30 PM
I don't have time to lay out the argument now, but later I will explain why this actually makes some sense.

Hint: they do not say what you say they say, that water doesn't hydrate the body. They also did not say what the headline of the linked article said, that water is not healthful.

What they did say is that the claim asked to be approved-- “regular consumption of significant amounts of water can reduce the risk of development of dehydration”-- is false, and that, specifically, is what I say makes sense.

Video at 11.

LWW
11-19-2011, 06:10 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I don't have time to lay out the argument now, but later I will explain why this actually makes some sense.

Hint: they do not say what you say they say, that water doesn't hydrate the body. They also did not say what the headline of the linked article said, that water is not healthful.

What they did say is that the claim asked to be approved-- “regular consumption of significant amounts of water can reduce the risk of development of dehydration”-- is false, and that, specifically, is what I say makes sense.

Video at 11. </div></div>
http://forums.azbilliards.com/images/newsmilies/killingme.gif

Soflasnapper
11-19-2011, 06:13 PM
So you scoff? I don't blame you, this time. Seems counterintuitive, what they say, and we all have seen your past proven aversion to nuanced distinctions.

I predict this argument will go completely over your head. But still, as promised, this would be the case for their position:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid.[1] It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. </div></div>

What are among the causes for an excessive loss of body fluids?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Differential diagnosis

In humans, dehydration can be caused by a wide range of diseases and states that impair water homeostasis in the body. These include:

External or stress-related causes
Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment
Prolonged exposure to dry air, e.g., in high-flying airplanes (5%–12% relative humidity)
Blood loss or hypotension due to physical trauma
Diarrhea
Hyperthermia
Shock (hypovolemic)
Vomiting
Burns
Lacrimation
Use of methamphetamine, amphetamine, caffeine and other stimulants
Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages

Infectious diseases
Cholera
Gastroenteritis
Shigellosis
Yellow fever

Malnutrition
Electrolyte disturbance
Hypernatremia (also caused by dehydration)
Hyponatremia, especially from restricted salt diets
Fasting
Recent rapid weight loss may reflect progressive depletion of fluid volume (the loss of 1 L of fluid results in a weight loss of 1 kg (2.2 lb)).[10]
Patient refusal of nutrition and hydration
Inability to swallow (obstruction of the oesophagus)

Other causes of obligate water loss

Severe hyperglycemia, especially in diabetes mellitus
Glycosuria
Uremia
Diabetes insipidus
Acute emergency dehydration event
Foodborne illness
</div></div>

Of all of these causes, none are PREVENTED by drinking a regular (significant) amount of water, except the first-- Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment

And even that one is iffy. For consider someone who drinks a normal amount of water, and is well hydrated in normal circumstances. Then he or she goes out and does a lot of prolonged exercise or work in a hot environment. Does that normal (and significant) amount of water prevent dehydration? No.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> In warm or humid weather or during heavy exertion, however, the water loss can increase by an order of magnitude or more[citation needed] through perspiration; all of which must be promptly replaced. In extreme cases, the losses may be great enough to exceed the body's ability to absorb water from the gastrointestinal tract; in these cases, it is not possible to drink enough water to stay hydrated, and the only way to avoid dehydration is to either pre-hydrate[13] or find ways to reduce perspiration (through rest, a move to a cooler environment, etc.)</div></div>

So EXCESS water from the normal significant amount of water is necessary, even in the only case in which the dehydration may be said to be the result of 'too little' water. NOT too little water with respect to normal hydration requirements, but too little water with respect to extreme hydration LOSSES.

That is, regular intake of 'significant' amounts of water doesn't prevent ANY of the causes of dehydration, necessarily, not even in arguably the best case scenario.

The confusion is worse because once dehydrated, the CURE is to drink MORE WATER (usually, although an example is given above where that will not work, and in pediatrics, special non-water fluids are indicated). It's true, BUT irrelevant. Drinking a good 40 to 60 oz. of water a day, a 'significant' amount, will NOT prevent dehydration due to excessive sweating, diarrhea, vomiting, fevers, etc.

I also note that such a statement on US water products would be disallowed, if provided in this form, by FDA label regs under the DSHEA. While "function statements" are allowed for food products and dietary supplements, those regs require the additional disclaimer: "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

DSHEA requires this to be set aside in a separate box-outlined text. While these manufacturers COULD say "Ingestion of significant amounts of water tends to support adequate hydration," here in the US, they could NOT say it prevents dehydration.

Interestingly, one of the significant contributing causes of dehydration is NOT EATING ENOUGH FOOD. Because 1) food contains a lot of water, and provides a significant part of daily hydration for most people, and 2) the waste product of food also contains a lot of water, and is available to a body in extremis by absorption from the gut.

Overall, drinking 'significant' amounts of water is necessary for adequate hydration, but not sufficient to assure that dehydration is avoided (unless by 'significant' one means 100 oz. or more, as can be required under heavy fluid losses from any number of situations).

eg8r
11-20-2011, 12:48 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: sofla's proof</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Of all of these causes, none are PREVENTED by drinking a regular (significant) amount of water, except the first-- Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment

And even that one is iffy. For consider someone who drinks a normal amount of water, and is well hydrated in normal circumstances. Then he or she goes out and does a lot of prolonged exercise or work in a hot environment. Does that normal (and significant) amount of water prevent dehydration? No.
</div></div>You are changing the wording to meet your idea but it doesn't work. The example states "adequate" NOT "normal". If you are drinking an ADEQUATE amount of water during this physical activity then the cause will not be an issue.

No matter how much you try to prove this group correct you still ignore the fact that this is way too much government intervention. There is no value add in this.

eg8r

ugotda7
11-20-2011, 12:54 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">So you scoff? I don't blame you, this time. Seems counterintuitive, what they say, and we all have seen your past proven aversion to nuanced distinctions.

I predict this argument will go completely over your head. But still, as promised, this would be the case for their position:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid.[1] It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. </div></div>

What are among the causes for an excessive loss of body fluids?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Differential diagnosis

In humans, dehydration can be caused by a wide range of diseases and states that impair water homeostasis in the body. These include:

External or stress-related causes
Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment
Prolonged exposure to dry air, e.g., in high-flying airplanes (5%–12% relative humidity)
Blood loss or hypotension due to physical trauma
Diarrhea
Hyperthermia
Shock (hypovolemic)
Vomiting
Burns
Lacrimation
Use of methamphetamine, amphetamine, caffeine and other stimulants
Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages

Infectious diseases
Cholera
Gastroenteritis
Shigellosis
Yellow fever

Malnutrition
Electrolyte disturbance
Hypernatremia (also caused by dehydration)
Hyponatremia, especially from restricted salt diets
Fasting
Recent rapid weight loss may reflect progressive depletion of fluid volume (the loss of 1 L of fluid results in a weight loss of 1 kg (2.2 lb)).[10]
Patient refusal of nutrition and hydration
Inability to swallow (obstruction of the oesophagus)

Other causes of obligate water loss

Severe hyperglycemia, especially in diabetes mellitus
Glycosuria
Uremia
Diabetes insipidus
Acute emergency dehydration event
Foodborne illness
</div></div>

Of all of these causes, none are PREVENTED by drinking a regular (significant) amount of water, except the first-- Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment

And even that one is iffy. For consider someone who drinks a normal amount of water, and is well hydrated in normal circumstances. Then he or she goes out and does a lot of prolonged exercise or work in a hot environment. Does that normal (and significant) amount of water prevent dehydration? No.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> In warm or humid weather or during heavy exertion, however, the water loss can increase by an order of magnitude or more[citation needed] through perspiration; all of which must be promptly replaced. In extreme cases, the losses may be great enough to exceed the body's ability to absorb water from the gastrointestinal tract; in these cases, it is not possible to drink enough water to stay hydrated, and the only way to avoid dehydration is to either pre-hydrate[13] or find ways to reduce perspiration (through rest, a move to a cooler environment, etc.)</div></div>

So EXCESS water from the normal significant amount of water is necessary, even in the only case in which the dehydration may be said to be the result of 'too little' water. NOT too little water with respect to normal hydration requirements, but too little water with respect to extreme hydration LOSSES.

That is, regular intake of 'significant' amounts of water doesn't prevent ANY of the causes of dehydration, necessarily, not even in arguably the best case scenario.

The confusion is worse because once dehydrated, the CURE is to drink MORE WATER (usually, although an example is given above where that will not work, and in pediatrics, special non-water fluids are indicated). It's true, BUT irrelevant. Drinking a good 40 to 60 oz. of water a day, a 'significant' amount, will NOT prevent dehydration due to excessive sweating, diarrhea, vomiting, fevers, etc.

I also note that such a statement on US water products would be disallowed, if provided in this form, by FDA label regs under the DSHEA. While "function statements" are allowed for food products and dietary supplements, those regs require the additional disclaimer: "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

DSHEA requires this to be set aside in a separate box-outlined text. While these manufacturers COULD say "Ingestion of significant amounts of water tends to support adequate hydration," here in the US, they could NOT say it prevents dehydration.

Interestingly, one of the significant contributing causes of dehydration is NOT EATING ENOUGH FOOD. Because 1) food contains a lot of water, and provides a significant part of daily hydration for most people, and 2) the waste product of food also contains a lot of water, and is available to a body in extremis by absorption from the gut.

Overall, drinking 'significant' amounts of water is necessary for adequate hydration, but not sufficient to assure that dehydration is avoided (unless by 'significant' one means 100 oz. or more, as can be required under heavy fluid losses from any number of situations). </div></div>

All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

LWW
11-20-2011, 04:03 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">So you scoff? I don't blame you, this time. Seems counterintuitive, what they say, and we all have seen your past proven aversion to nuanced distinctions.

I predict this argument will go completely over your head. But still, as promised, this would be the case for their position:

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid.[1] It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. </div></div>

What are among the causes for an excessive loss of body fluids?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Differential diagnosis

In humans, dehydration can be caused by a wide range of diseases and states that impair water homeostasis in the body. These include:

External or stress-related causes
Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment
Prolonged exposure to dry air, e.g., in high-flying airplanes (5%–12% relative humidity)
Blood loss or hypotension due to physical trauma
Diarrhea
Hyperthermia
Shock (hypovolemic)
Vomiting
Burns
Lacrimation
Use of methamphetamine, amphetamine, caffeine and other stimulants
Excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages

Infectious diseases
Cholera
Gastroenteritis
Shigellosis
Yellow fever

Malnutrition
Electrolyte disturbance
Hypernatremia (also caused by dehydration)
Hyponatremia, especially from restricted salt diets
Fasting
Recent rapid weight loss may reflect progressive depletion of fluid volume (the loss of 1 L of fluid results in a weight loss of 1 kg (2.2 lb)).[10]
Patient refusal of nutrition and hydration
Inability to swallow (obstruction of the oesophagus)

Other causes of obligate water loss

Severe hyperglycemia, especially in diabetes mellitus
Glycosuria
Uremia
Diabetes insipidus
Acute emergency dehydration event
Foodborne illness
</div></div>

Of all of these causes, none are PREVENTED by drinking a regular (significant) amount of water, except the first-- Prolonged physical activity with sweating without consuming adequate water, especially in a hot and/or dry environment

And even that one is iffy. For consider someone who drinks a normal amount of water, and is well hydrated in normal circumstances. Then he or she goes out and does a lot of prolonged exercise or work in a hot environment. Does that normal (and significant) amount of water prevent dehydration? No.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> In warm or humid weather or during heavy exertion, however, the water loss can increase by an order of magnitude or more[citation needed] through perspiration; all of which must be promptly replaced. In extreme cases, the losses may be great enough to exceed the body's ability to absorb water from the gastrointestinal tract; in these cases, it is not possible to drink enough water to stay hydrated, and the only way to avoid dehydration is to either pre-hydrate[13] or find ways to reduce perspiration (through rest, a move to a cooler environment, etc.)</div></div>

So EXCESS water from the normal significant amount of water is necessary, even in the only case in which the dehydration may be said to be the result of 'too little' water. NOT too little water with respect to normal hydration requirements, but too little water with respect to extreme hydration LOSSES.

That is, regular intake of 'significant' amounts of water doesn't prevent ANY of the causes of dehydration, necessarily, not even in arguably the best case scenario.

The confusion is worse because once dehydrated, the CURE is to drink MORE WATER (usually, although an example is given above where that will not work, and in pediatrics, special non-water fluids are indicated). It's true, BUT irrelevant. Drinking a good 40 to 60 oz. of water a day, a 'significant' amount, will NOT prevent dehydration due to excessive sweating, diarrhea, vomiting, fevers, etc.

I also note that such a statement on US water products would be disallowed, if provided in this form, by FDA label regs under the DSHEA. While "function statements" are allowed for food products and dietary supplements, those regs require the additional disclaimer: "This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease."

DSHEA requires this to be set aside in a separate box-outlined text. While these manufacturers COULD say "Ingestion of significant amounts of water tends to support adequate hydration," here in the US, they could NOT say it prevents dehydration.

Interestingly, one of the significant contributing causes of dehydration is NOT EATING ENOUGH FOOD. Because 1) food contains a lot of water, and provides a significant part of daily hydration for most people, and 2) the waste product of food also contains a lot of water, and is available to a body in extremis by absorption from the gut.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Overall, drinking 'significant' amounts of water is necessary for adequate hydration</span>, but not sufficient to assure that dehydration is avoided (unless by 'significant' one means 100 oz. or more, as can be required under heavy fluid losses from any number of situations). </div></div>

http://forums.azbilliards.com/images/newsmilies/killingme.gif

What a tool of the state you are.

Just as a crazy thought ... I decided to check the opinions of some well respected medical arts practitioners, as opposed to your beloved statist master's propaganda.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">DEHYDRATION

Prevention
By Mayo Clinic staff

<span style='font-size: 26pt'><span style='font-family: Arial Black'>To prevent dehydration, drink plenty of fluids</span></span> </div></div>
<span style='font-size: 17pt'>&gt;&gt;&gt;SNOOPY, THIS IS A LINK&lt;&lt;&lt; (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=prevention)</span>

Next up ... 20 years of hard time for suggesting that regular food intake lessens your risk of starvation.

LWW
11-20-2011, 04:06 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ugotda7</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.</div></div>

At the risk of imprisonment upon my next Euro trip ... the best way to hydrate rocks is pouring water on them.

Soflasnapper
11-20-2011, 09:15 AM
All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient.

So if you want to say the advice is to always be drinking 200 oz. of water, so that a tour of duty in summer time in Iraq will not cause dehydration in one day, I would stand corrected. But that is moving the goalposts.

Actually, the typical 40 to 50 oz. which would achieve adequate hydration normally will NOT prevent dehydration should one be out in 105 degree weather. Unless drinking a lot of water prevents fevers, extreme sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., which it does not.

Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

Soflasnapper
11-20-2011, 09:19 AM
Then we should find ample claims of this for the many brands of water out there on American labels. We do not, and such a claim would be disallowed under the DSHEA.

Soflasnapper
11-20-2011, 10:05 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ugotda7</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.</div></div>

At the risk of imprisonment upon my next Euro trip ... the best way to hydrate rocks is pouring water on them. </div></div>

Would you say adding a significant amount of oil to your car prevents oil leaks? It's true, once you have an oil leak, it is best to add oil, to prevent an overheated engine's seizing up or blowing the head gasket. It's also true that IF you have an oil leak, it may be best to add oil every day, or even several times a day. But does adding oil do anything about an oil leak per se?

hondo
11-20-2011, 12:06 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient.

So if you want to say the advice is to always be drinking 200 oz. of water, so that a tour of duty in summer time in Iraq will not cause dehydration in one day, I would stand corrected. But that is moving the goalposts.

Actually, the typical 40 to 50 oz. which would achieve adequate hydration normally will NOT prevent dehydration should one be out in 105 degree weather. Unless drinking a lot of water prevents fevers, extreme sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., which it does not.

Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

</div></div>

Unbelievable. One poster on here satiates dub's cravings for attention by bothering to answer him and yugo calls that an obsession with him.
Gotta love these characters!

ugotda7
11-20-2011, 01:23 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: hondo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient.

So if you want to say the advice is to always be drinking 200 oz. of water, so that a tour of duty in summer time in Iraq will not cause dehydration in one day, I would stand corrected. But that is moving the goalposts.

Actually, the typical 40 to 50 oz. which would achieve adequate hydration normally will NOT prevent dehydration should one be out in 105 degree weather. Unless drinking a lot of water prevents fevers, extreme sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., which it does not.

Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

</div></div>

Unbelievable. One poster on here satiates dub's cravings for attention by bothering to answer him and yugo calls that an obsession with him.
Gotta love these characters! </div></div>

And here you are with your obsession as well.....LWW has you folks on a string but in true BD fashion you're too dumb to see it.

LWW
11-20-2011, 02:48 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient. </div></div>

So your argument has devolved to water won't eliminate dehydration because the only thing that eliminates dehydration is water.

Astounding.

LWW
11-20-2011, 02:49 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

</div></div>

That is ridiculous as most everything we eat has a high water content.

Dance some more for us.

LWW
11-20-2011, 02:52 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ugotda7</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.</div></div>

At the risk of imprisonment upon my next Euro trip ... the best way to hydrate rocks is pouring water on them. </div></div>

Would you say adding a significant amount of oil to your car prevents oil leaks? It's true, once you have an oil leak, it is best to add oil, to prevent an overheated engine's seizing up or blowing the head gasket. It's also true that IF you have an oil leak, it may be best to add oil every day, or even several times a day. But does adding oil do anything about an oil leak per se? </div></div>

You are so cute when you try to act smart.

Now, to make your brain dead analogy make some sense ... the surest way to not ever run out of oil is to fill the crankcase up with oil and then add oil as needed.

Any other approach will lead to an oil shortage.

Do you even know how to check your oil?

LWW
11-20-2011, 02:53 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ugotda7</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: hondo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient.

So if you want to say the advice is to always be drinking 200 oz. of water, so that a tour of duty in summer time in Iraq will not cause dehydration in one day, I would stand corrected. But that is moving the goalposts.

Actually, the typical 40 to 50 oz. which would achieve adequate hydration normally will NOT prevent dehydration should one be out in 105 degree weather. Unless drinking a lot of water prevents fevers, extreme sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., which it does not.

Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

</div></div>

Unbelievable. One poster on here satiates dub's cravings for attention by bothering to answer him and yugo calls that an obsession with him.
Gotta love these characters! </div></div>

And here you are with your obsession as well.....LWW has you folks on a string but in true BD fashion you're too dumb to see it. </div></div>

Well ... at least I'm balanced again since I have one swinging from each side of the sack.

cushioncrawler
11-20-2011, 03:41 PM
Dont forget that one kan drink too much water. Here the brain swells and death follows.
This sometimes happens when peeple go to a desert having recieved advice to drink lots of water and hencely they drink water and drink water and then drink some more.

Hencely bottled water shood hav this problem in big letters on the label. Seriously.

And, laboratory tests with rats indikate that a bucket of water kan potentially drown over 1000 adults. But u wont see this on any labels. Hmmmmmmm.
mac.

cushioncrawler
11-20-2011, 03:46 PM
Unintentional Drowning: Fact Sheet
On this Page
OverviewHow big is the problem?Who is most at risk?What factors influence drowning risk?What has research found?How can drowning be prevented?ReferencesOverview
Every day, about ten people die from unintentional drowning. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. Drowning is the sixth leading cause of unintentional injury death for people of all ages, and the second leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 14 years.1

How big is the problem?
•In 2007, there were 3,443 fatal unintentional drownings (non-boating related) in the United States, averaging ten deaths per day. An additional 496 people died from drowning in boating-related incidents.1,2
•More than one in five people who die from drowning are children 14 and younger.1 For every child who dies from drowning, another four received emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries.1
•More than 55% of drowning victims treated in emergency departments require hospitalization or transfer for higher levels of care (compared to a hospitalization rate of 3-5% for all unintentional injuries).1 These injuries can be severe.
•Nonfatal drownings can cause brain damage that may result in long-term disabilities including memory problems, learning disabilities, and permanent loss of basic functioning (e.g., permanent vegetative state).

cushioncrawler
11-20-2011, 03:50 PM
Death By Water

Just don't forget about your Electrolytes
Hold Your Wee for a Wii Turns Deadly

Its an almost unbelievable story, a 28 year old mother of three is competing in a radio show contest to win a brand new Nintendo Wii for her children. She consumes massive amounts of water and literally dies the next day from water intoxication poisoning (also called hyperhydration). Hyperhydration is basically when your body consumes so much water that it puts your body out of its natural balance of water to electrolytes. When you perspire, you not only lose water but also electrolytes. To rehydrate, drinking water is usually safe for most of us, but massive quantities can be deadly as in the case with Jennifer Strange, who died January 12th of 2007 due to this radio contest.

Even more troubling are the facts that KDND 107.9 was privy to many of the warning signs and had callers calling in warning of the dangers of water poisoning. The station was also was aware of an incident in 2005 at California State University where a college student died of this during a hazing incident due to hyperhydration. Unfortunately no criminal charges were brought up against the station but the FCC is investigating the incident.

Hyperhydration is also something to keep in mind with small children. In 2002 a 3 year old died from being forced to drink 3/4 of a gallon of water as a form of punishment by her babysitter. Fortunately there was some justice in this case as babysitter was charged with 1st degree murder. Children are more susceptible to water poisoning simply due to them being smaller than adults.

Marathon runners, other high performance athletes , and really anyone perspiring a lot during a real long work out also need to be wary of water intoxication. This is why Gatorade is such a popular item for athletes as it is loaded with all the ingredients which we sweat out. It is still smart to drink water if dehydrated, as the number of deaths by dehydration strongly outweighs death by massive water consumption, however one should always be aware of this in case they are in a similar situation to any listed above.

People who are ill also need to keep in mind that water intoxication is possible although in most cases it is out of our control. Well known artist Andy Warhol, known for his paintings of Campbell's Soup, Coca-Cola and other famous American products and icons in the 1960's, died in 1987 from water intoxication. Warhol was in the hospital for a routine gallbladder surgery, but due to the hospital staff mistakenly overloading him with fluids, he died of a heart attack caused by hyperhydration.

The actual odds of one dying by water intoxication is extremely low. Again if you are dehydrated, don't fear drinking water as dehydration is responsible for at least 300 deaths a year in the United States alone and is surmised to cause 2 million deaths per year in the world. However, if you are in any of the situations listed above, it might be a good idea to have some Gatorade on hand just in case.

cushioncrawler
11-20-2011, 03:54 PM
Water poisoning is caused by excessive consumption of water during a short period of time. This leads to a disruption in normal brain function due to the imbalance of electrolytes in the body’s fluids. Humans are made up of approximately 55 to 65% water, depending on gender, so water is necessary to survive. Water in and of itself is not toxic by any means, but rapid ingestion of a large quantity of water can dilute the careful balance of sodium compounds in the body fluids.

Our body has a balanced method of processing and excreting fluids, either through urine or perspiration. Over-diluting the sodium and potassium levels in the blood plasma through excessive consumption of water is called hyponatremia and contributes to what is called an osmotic shift of the fluid inside and outside the cells. The pressure from this action results in a swelling of the cells, often in the central nervous system, including the brain. This may result in water intoxication, which is not as serious as water poisoning, or as it is also called, hyperhydration.

When the cell membranes can no longer withstand the pressure, the cells can begin to die. This is indicated in more serious forms of water intoxication and water poisoning. Symptoms of water poisoning include lightheadedness, vomiting, headache, nausea and unresponsiveness. When the sodium in the blood plasma falls to dangerous levels, swelling of the brain, coma, seizures and possibly death may occur.

What constitutes a fatal amount of water can vary from person to person, depending on one's state of health, his or her physical activity at the time, the temperature and the amount of time in which the person consumes the water. For some, a one time consumption of six pints (three liters) can prove deadly. Although the person consuming the water may lose a lot of fluid due to perspiration during heavy labor or exercise, the electrolytes are not replaced fast enough to avoid water poisoning.

Those particularly at risk for water poisoning are athletes engaged in long distance running. Due to the need to replace large quantities of lost fluid, runners must drink a lot of water. This can lead to water poisoning, so runners must replenish their fluids with sports drinks that have added electrolytes. There have been several tragic cases of water poisonings at marathons and sporting events throughout the world, including the death of Cynthia Lucero at the 2002 Boston Marathon.

Other factors that contribute to water poisoning include the use of the drug ecstasy and hazing practices. Many “ravers,” while taking ecstasy, drink large quantities of water to avoid dehydration. Their reduced ability to reason can make this behavior dangerous. Many college students have been rushed to the hospital after consuming excessive amounts of water in hazing rituals. Psychiatric diseases can also lead to water poisoning. Psychogenic polydipsia is a condition in which the affected person feels a need to drink a lot of water for unknown reasons.

Water poisoning is completely avoidable. For athletes, paying attention to how much water is consumed in one sitting, as well as using sports drinks to replenish lost fluids, is the best advice. When one feels thirst, the body is signaling dehydration, not an imbalance in electrolytes. It is commonly accepted among medical experts that it is more important to avoid dehydration than to attempt to avoid water poisoning. One should trust his or her instincts when drinking water and use common sense.

JohnnyD
11-21-2011, 12:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: hondo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All you're doing with your LWW obsession in this case is making yourself look as dumb as a box of rocks.

Starting from an adequately hydrated state will delay, but not prevent, dehydration, if you have a massive loss of body fluids from any one of the causes of dehydration I mention. Once that occurs, a large extra amount of water, as in 2x or 3x to 5x normal 'significant' amounts of water are required, as the normal 'significant' amounts one would drink are insufficient.

So if you want to say the advice is to always be drinking 200 oz. of water, so that a tour of duty in summer time in Iraq will not cause dehydration in one day, I would stand corrected. But that is moving the goalposts.

Actually, the typical 40 to 50 oz. which would achieve adequate hydration normally will NOT prevent dehydration should one be out in 105 degree weather. Unless drinking a lot of water prevents fevers, extreme sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, etc., which it does not.

Notice as well that 'fasting' (not eating food) is mentioned as a cause of dehydration. Nothing about fasting involves skimping on water.

</div></div>

Unbelievable. One poster on here satiates dub's cravings for attention by bothering to answer him and yugo calls that an obsession with him.
Gotta love these characters! </div></div>Your too busy talking about getting loaded to realize LWW owns you.

LWW
11-21-2011, 05:52 AM
I don't own anyone JohnnyD, I just tell him the truth.

How he reacts to it is his decision.

Owning people is what the Kornfield Kounty Krew believes in.