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nAz
12-16-2011, 03:35 PM
wow I just glanced through a few threads and was surprised not to find a single Post about SOPA.
I thought that this would be one of the few things that would actually unite all the Left and Right members here... you know more intrusive bigger government and First Amendment issues.


little back ground in case anyone cares ==> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_Online_Piracy_Act

Sev
12-16-2011, 03:43 PM
I was hoping Obama would veto it.
It has civil rights groups up in arms.
They modified. However its still another step on the road to serfdom.

eg8r
12-17-2011, 02:54 PM
It just seems odd that we have to have a new bill for this. If it is piracy why isn't it covered by piracy bills already signed into law?

eg8r

cushioncrawler
12-17-2011, 03:31 PM
http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h299/wdub82/pirateship.jpg

cushioncrawler
12-17-2011, 03:32 PM
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f382/shaggyman7/Tattoo/Pirate.gif

cushioncrawler
12-17-2011, 04:02 PM
wikileaks
A privateer or corsair used similar methods to a pirate, but acted while in possession of a commission or letter of marque from a government or monarch authorizing the capture of merchant ships belonging to an enemy nation. For example, the United States Constitution of 1787 specifically authorized Congress to issue letters of marque and reprisal. The letter of marque was recognized by international convention and meant that a privateer could not technically be charged with piracy while attacking the targets named in his commission. This nicety of law did not always save the individuals concerned, however, as whether one was considered a pirate or a legally operating privateer often depended on whose custody the individual found himself in—that of the country that had issued the commission, or that of the object of attack. Spanish authorities were known to execute foreign privateers with their letters of marque hung around their necks to emphasize Spain's rejection of such defenses. Furthermore, many privateers exceeded the bounds of their letters of marque by attacking nations with which their sovereign was at peace (Thomas Tew and William Kidd are notable examples), and thus made themselves liable to conviction for piracy. However, a letter of marque did provide some cover for such pirates, as plunder seized from neutral or friendly shipping could be passed off later as taken from enemy merchants.

The famous Barbary Corsairs (authorized by the Ottoman Empire) of the Mediterranean were privateers, as were the Maltese Corsairs, who were authorized by the Knights of St. John, and the Dunkirkers in the service of the Spanish Empire. In the years 1626–1634 alone, the Dunkirk privateers captured 1,499 ships, and sank another 336.[45] From 1609 to 1616, England lost 466 merchant ships to Barbary pirates, and 160 British ships were captured by Algerians between 1677 and 1680.[46] One famous privateer was Sir Francis Drake. His patron was Queen Elizabeth I, and their relationship ultimately proved to be quite profitable for England.[47]

Privateers were a large proportion of the total military force at sea during the 17th and 18th centuries. During the Nine Years War, the French adopted a policy of strongly encouraging privateers, including the famous Jean Bart, to attack English and Dutch shipping. England lost roughly 4,000 merchant ships during the war.[48] In the following War of Spanish Succession, privateer attacks continued, Britain losing 3,250 merchant ships.[49] During the War of Austrian Succession, Britain lost 3,238 merchant ships and France lost 3,434 merchant ships to the British.[48]

During King George's War, approximately 36,000 Americans served aboard privateers at one time or another.[48] During the American Revolution, about 55,000 American seamen served aboard the privateers.[50] The American privateers had almost 1,700 ships, and they captured 2,283 enemy ships.[51] Between the end of the Revolutionary War and 1812, less than 30 years, Britain, France, Naples, the Barbary States, Spain, and the Netherlands seized approximately 2,500 American ships.[52] Payments in ransom and tribute to the Barbary states amounted to 20% of United States government annual revenues in 1800.[53] Throughout the American Civil War, Confederate privateers successfully harassed Union merchant ships.[54]

Privateering lost international sanction under the Declaration of Paris in 1856.

nAz
12-17-2011, 04:04 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I was hoping Obama would veto it.
It has civil rights groups up in arms.
They modified. However its still another step on the road to serfdom. </div></div>

I was hoping he would VETO it too. who knows someone could with a single click of a button complain that CCB/AZb is posting "copy righted material" and brand them a rogue site.

cushioncrawler
12-17-2011, 04:07 PM
The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union were the first constitution of the United States of America.[1] The problem with the United States government under the Articles of Confederation was, in the words of George Washington, "no money".[2]

Congress could print money, but by 1786, the money was useless. Congress could borrow money, but could not pay it back.[2] No state paid all of their U.S. taxes; Georgia paid nothing. Some few paid an amount equal to interest on the national debt owed to their citizens, but no more.[2] No interest was paid on debt owed foreign governments. By 1786, the United States would default on the dates the principal came due.[2]

The United States could not defend itself as an independent nation in the world of 1787. Most of the U.S. troops in the 625-man U.S. Army were deployed facing British forts on American soil. The troops had not been paid; some were deserting and the remainder threatened mutiny.[3]Spain closed New Orleans to American commerce. The United States protested, to no effect. The Barbary Pirates began seizing American commercial ships. The Treasury had no funds to pay the pirates' extortion demands. The Congress had no more credit if another military crisis had required action.[2]

The states were proving inadequate to the requirements of sovereignty in a confederation. Although the 1783 Treaty of Paris had been made between Great Britain and the United States with each state named individually, individual states violated their peace treaty with Britain. New York and South Carolina repeatedly prosecuted Loyalists for wartime activity and redistributed their lands over the protests of both Great Britain and the Articles Congress.[2]

In Massachusetts during Shays' Rebellion, Congress had no money to support a constituent state, nor could Massachusetts pay for its own internal defense. General Benjamin Lincoln had to raise funds among Boston merchants to pay for a volunteer army.[4] During the upcoming Convention, James Madison angrily questioned whether the Articles of Confederation was a compact or even government. Connecticut paid nothing and "positively refused" to pay U.S. assessments for two years.[5] A rumor had it that a "seditious party" of New York legislators had opened communication with the Viceroy of Canada. To the south, the British were said to be funding the Creek Indian raids; Savannah was fortified, the State of Georgia under martial law.[6]

Congress was paralyzed. It could do nothing significant without nine states, and some legislative business required all thirteen. When only one member of a state was on the floor, then that state’s vote did not count. If a delegation were evenly divided, no vote counted towards the nine-count requirement.[7] Individual state legislatures independently laid embargoes, negotiated directly with foreigners, raised armies and made war, all violating the letter and the spirit of the “Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union”. The Articles Congress had "virtually ceased trying to govern."[8] The vision of a "respectable nation" among nations seemed to be fading in the eyes of revolutionaries such as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Rufus King. The dream of a republic, a nation without hereditary rulers, with power derived from the people in frequent elections, was in doubt.[9]

nAz
12-17-2011, 04:12 PM
You are right the means to file a complaint were all ready in place, what is being pushed now is pretty scary.
I really believe the politicians have no freaking idea how much power they are giving to media companies. Or if they do they are going along with because it also puts more power in government hand not to mention all the $ they have been receiving over the years.

nAz
12-17-2011, 04:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: cushioncrawler</div><div class="ubbcode-body">http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f382/shaggyman7/Tattoo/Pirate.gif </div></div>

lol nice.


Powers that be can not truly shut down sites like Piratebay since they are over seas, You know someone with a little knowledge knows there are ways to get to these site even if SOPA is enacted in its current form... Ever hear of the deep web and Tor browser? dangerous place to visit if you don't know what your doing but you can find just about anything in the deep web.

Sev
12-17-2011, 04:48 PM
Tor really is not enough. Unfortunately most anonymous surfing groups will boot you if you are downloading from Peer to Peer sites.

sack316
12-19-2011, 12:19 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: nAz</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
lol nice.


Powers that be can not truly shut down sites like Piratebay since they are over seas, You know someone with a little knowledge knows there are ways to get to these site even if SOPA is enacted in its current form... Ever hear of the deep web and Tor browser? dangerous place to visit if you don't know what your doing but you can find just about anything in the deep web.
</div></div>

No way, this will surely stop everything! I mean, I NEVER still download music or movies or found ways to play poker or anything like that /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

Sack

Qtec
12-20-2011, 07:01 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If it is piracy why isn't it covered by piracy bills already signed into law?

eg8r </div></div>

As usual, totally clueless.

Q

eg8r
12-20-2011, 05:07 PM
LOL, thank goodness naz responded before you opened your mouth. LOL, I just don't understand why you continue to prove your stupidity by talking?

eg8r

Qtec
12-22-2011, 02:55 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">LOL, thank goodness naz responded before you opened your mouth. LOL, I just don't understand why you continue to prove your stupidity by talking?

eg8r </div></div>

How can linking to a site be piracy?

Just shows how much you know about the subject.

Q

Qtec
12-22-2011, 03:01 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">DeSopa Firefox Add-On Lets Users Circumvent SOPA Restrictions

As the public debate over the merits and drawbacks of the SOPA bill continues, consumers and privacy advocates already are looking for ways to get around the provisions in the proposed anti-piracy law that they see as unreasonable and oppressive. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>In one example, a developer has published an extension for Firefox that helps users circumvent SOPA's domain blacklisting.</span>

<span style="color: #3333FF">The DeSopa add-on for Firefox is designed for the express purpose of helping users get to domains that the provisions in SOPA might be used to block. SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) is ostensibly meant to protect content creators and rights holders by cracking down on sites that host content that infringes on copyrights. However, many people have criticized the bill, saying that it is overly broad and could result in harsh sanctions on sites that have such content, whether it's one song or photo or an entire site full of it. The bill also includes language that experts say could enable the government to block sites in other countries that host such content.</span>

There also have been concerns raised about the security and network-stability implications because of the way that the proposed system would work. The EFF and others have said that the bill would stifle technological innovation and could force some sites offline. The <u>DeSopa Firefox add-on is meant to help users get around these restrictions by not using the domain to resolve URLs, but rather using IP addresses.</u>

"This program is a proof of concept that SOPA will not help prevent piracy. The program, implemented as a Firefox extension, simply contacts offshore domain name resolution services to obtain the IP address for any desired website, and accesses those websites directly via IP. Similar offshore resolution services will eventually maintain their own cache of websites, without blacklisting, in order to meet the demand created by SOPA," the designer of DeSopa, Tamer Rizk, wrote in the release notes for the add-on.

"If SOPA is implemented, thousands of similar and more innovative programs and services will sprout up to provide access to the websites that people frequent. SOPA is a mistake. It does not even technically help solve the underlying problem, as this software illustrates. What it will do is give undue leverage to predatory organizations, cripple innocent third party websites, severely dampen digital innovation and negatively impact the integrity and security of the Internet. "

House of Representatives members spent two days last week in markup hearings for SOPA, eventually deciding nothing and pushing off any decisions on amendments to the bill until next year. There is a similar bill in play in the Senate, known as PIPA (Protect IP Act), and a group of Internet pioneers and security experts has weighed in on the bills' flaws and problems in a letter sent to Congress last week.

</div></div>


Q

eg8r
12-22-2011, 09:28 PM
And you prove my point yet again.

eg8r

LWW
12-28-2011, 04:09 AM
The goal is for the state to have a weapon to restrict the rights of the people.

They have witnessed how the web can be used to manage protests beneath the state's radar ... and they feel it must be stopped.

Qtec
12-28-2011, 05:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">And you prove my point yet again.

eg8r </div></div>

..as do you make my point.

eg8r, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>ALL opinion, no facts.</span> Usually, not even an opinion based on facts. [ Except the facts he hears from Boortz, Limbaugh and the rest of the RW echo machine. ]


In this case, not even an opinion, just the same old attack the messenger crap.

Go on, call me ANOTHER name. Every time you do it makes you look smarter, believe me.



Q................LOL

LWW
12-28-2011, 05:36 AM
[quote=Qtec]Go on, call me ANOTHER name. Every time you do it makes you look smarter, believe me.



Q................LOL [/quote

Hardly needed IMHO ... you prove yourself to be an intellectual pygmy all on your own.