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Qtec
12-29-2011, 02:41 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Voting Law Changes in 2012

Ahead of the 2012 elections, a wave of legislation tightening restrictions on voting has suddenly swept across the country. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>More than five million Americans could be affected</span> by the new rules already put in place this year -- <span style='font-size: 14pt'>a number larger than the margin of victory in two of the last three presidential elections.</span>

This report is the first full accounting and analysis of this year's voting cutbacks. It details both the bills that have been proposed and the legislation that has been passed since the beginning of 2011.



Executive Summary

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>Over the past century, our nation expanded the franchise and knocked down myriad barriers to full electoral participation. <u>In 2011, however, that momentum abruptly shifted.</u></span>

State governments across the country enacted an array of new laws making it harder to register or to vote. Some states require voters to show government-issued photo identification, often of a type that as many as one in ten voters do not have. Other states have cut back on early voting, a hugely popular innovation used by millions of Americans. Two states reversed earlier reforms and once again disenfranchised millions who have past criminal convictions but who are now taxpaying members of the community. Still others made it much more difficult for citizens to register to vote, a prerequisite for voting.

These new restrictions fall most heavily on young, minority, and low-income voters, as well as on voters with disabilities. This wave of changes may sharply tilt the political terrain for the 2012 election. Based on the Brennan Center’s analysis of the 19 laws and two executive actions that passed in 14 states, it is clear that:

These new laws could make it significantly harder for more than five million eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012.
The states that have already cut back on voting rights will provide 171 electoral votes in 2012 – 63 percent of the 270 needed to win the presidency.
Of the 12 likely battleground states, as assessed by an August Los Angeles Times analysis of Gallup polling, five have already cut back on voting rights (and may pass additional restrictive legislation), and two more are currently considering new restrictions.
</div></div>

link (http://www.brennancenter.org/content/resource/voting_law_changes_in_2012)

When more people vote, the Republicans always lose, they know this.

link (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GBAsFwPglw)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">"Now many of our Christians have what I call the goo-goo syndrome — good government. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>They want everybody to vote. I don't want everybody to vote.</span> Elections are not won by a majority of people, they never have been from the beginning of our country and they are not now. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>As a matter of fact, our leverage in the elections quite candidly goes up as the voting populace goes down."</span> </div></div>

This is what Rove has been planning for 20 years or more. Along with the attack on the unions this voter fraud myth/fabrication/lie is an assault on the US people and the democratic system of electing representatives. They want less people to vote and they are targeting those who traditionally vote for the opposition.

IMO, it goes against the spirit and meaning of the USCON.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of <u>failure to pay poll tax or other tax.</u> </div></div>

It could be argued that when it costs you to money to obtain the required ID card, that has never been required before, then its a tax on voting.

Even if its not, its an outrage.

Q


What's Mitt's take on this? if..if..if..if.... (http://videocafe.crooksandliars.com/david/romney-very-serious-error-bock-voter-photo-i)

LWW
12-29-2011, 03:29 AM
Only residents of Moonbhattistan would see enforcing election laws as stealing an election.

Your hypocrisy is unbelievable my foreign friend, as it was you who has slavishly excused and/or defended every example of election fraud by the demokrooks ... and they are legion.

Have you no honor?

eg8r
12-29-2011, 07:32 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">State governments across the country enacted an array of new laws making it harder to register or to vote. Some states require voters to show government-issued photo identification, often of a type that as many as one in ten voters do not have.</div></div>Why do you think this is a bad idea? Why do you think only 1 in 10 have this identification?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Still others made it much more difficult for citizens to register to vote, a prerequisite for voting.

These new restrictions fall most heavily on young, minority, and low-income voters, as well as on voters with disabilities. This wave of changes may sharply tilt the political terrain for the 2012 election. Based on the Brennan Center’s analysis of the 19 laws and two executive actions that passed in 14 states, it is clear that:

These new laws could make it significantly harder for more than five million eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012.

</div></div>
But how? What actually was changed that makes these statements true? Seems the author is staying vague because they know all this is BS.

eg8r

Qtec
12-29-2011, 09:59 PM
Vague?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Overall, legislators introduced and passed the following measures:
• Photo ID laws. At least thirty-four states introduced legislation that would require voters to show photo identification in order to vote. Photo ID bills were signed into law in seven states: Alabama, Kansas, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. By contrast, before the 2011 legislative session, only two states had ever imposed strict photo ID requirements. The number of states with laws requiring voters to show government-issued photo identification has quadrupled in 2011. To put this into context, 11% of American citizens do not possess a government-issued photo ID; that is over 21 million citizens.
• Proof of citizenship laws. At least twelve states introduced legislation that would require proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate, to register or vote. Proof of citizenship laws passed in Alabama, Kansas, and Tennessee. Previously, only two states had passed proof of citizenship laws, and only one had put such a requirement in effect. The number of states with such a requirement has more than doubled.
• Making voter registration harder. At least thirteen states introduced bills to end highly popular Election Day and same-day voter registration, limit voter registration mobilization efforts, and reduce other registration opportunities. Maine passed a law eliminating Election Day registration, and Ohio ended its weeklong period of same-day voter registration. Florida,
voting voting voting LAW CHANGES | 3
Illinois, and Texas passed laws restricting voter registration drives, and Florida and Wisconsin passed laws making it more difficult for people who move to stay registered and vote.
• Reducing early and absentee days. At least nine states introduced bills to reduce their early voting periods, and four tried to reduce absentee voting opportunities. Florida, Georgia, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia succeeded in enacting bills reducing early voting.
• Making it harder to restore voting rights. Two states—Florida and Iowa—reversed prior executive actions that made it easier for citizens with past felony convictions to restore their voting rights, affecting hundreds of thousands of voters. In effect, both states now permanently disenfranchise most citizens with past felony convictions. </div></div>

detailed report (http://brennan.3cdn.net/d16bab3d00e5a82413_66m6y5xpw.pdf)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Why do you think this is a bad idea? </div></div>

Why would it be a good idea? Its absolutely unnecessary.

Q

Qtec
12-30-2011, 01:21 AM
not BS (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=nHhpTyDYXfM)


ALEC/Koch bros don't want some people to vote (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=dwOTm3ShQh0#!)
Q

LWW
12-30-2011, 02:33 AM
True.

They don't want illegals to vote, or for CITIZENS" bussed in from other states to vote.

Now, again, why do you think this is bad?

eg8r
12-30-2011, 11:42 PM
It is all BS. Why do you think a voter should be allowed to vote if they cannot identify themselves? Why shouldn't they be forced to show identification?

eg8r

pooltchr
12-31-2011, 01:01 AM
He's a liberal...he believes in the old saying..."vote early and often".

Most reasonable people understand that voter verification is actually a good thing that helps prevent anyone from trying to steal an election. I love how they have tried to spin this one! LOL

Steve

LWW
12-31-2011, 03:11 AM
Welcome back Steve.

Snoopy is merely parroting what his intellectual masters have told him his "OPINION" is.

Unlike snoopy, I bothered to check these claims out.

Here's what I learned:

1 - Iowa's legislature is not ran by the (R) party, it is a bicameral body with the (R) party controlling the house and the demokrooks controlling the senate.

2 - The (R) led house passed a voter ID law in 2011.

3 - The demokrook led house rejected it.

4 - The reason one doesn't have to show an ID to vote in Iowa is because of the demokrooks.

5 - That bever stopped the demokrooks from blaming others for their own treachery.

6 - Snoopy will believe whatever version of "TRUTH" the party tells him to believe.

LEAPING LIZARDS ... THE LEFT HAS BEEN PLAYED LIKE PERLMAN PLAYS A STRAD. AGAIN. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iowa_General_Assembly)

AND THERE IS NO REASON TO BELIEVE IT WON'T HAPPEN AGAIN. AND AGAIN. AND AGAIN. (http://www.uiowa.edu/~ipro/Papers%202011/Voter%20Indentification%202011.pdf)