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Qtec
02-12-2012, 02:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Rick Santorum has been outspoken about his Catholic faith on the campaign trail, explaining how his faith and personal values have influenced his political positions. But at a campaign event at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma today, Santorum had trouble rationalizing how he reconciled his opposition to health care reform with the Catholic Church’s support of the plan. A questioner asked Santorum, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>“With you lining up with the Catholic faith on so many issues, why not the Catholic Church on health care since it is a value and<span style='font-size: 26pt'> a human right</span>?”</span> </div></div>

Get that? A human right!

Rick blabs on and on about nothing and then calls this 'human right' an "opportunity to BUY healthcare."

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">My conscience was formed as a result of my life experiences and primarily through faith and through the moral values I was taught through the teachings within the Bible and the church. Yes, I bring that to the table. That’s who I am. [...]

I look at the Affordable Care Act and say, both from the standpoint of faith, do I believe that people should have the opportunity to purchase health care? </div></div>

Truth is, Rick et al want to pick and choose what Christian values they want to impose on the rest.

watch him flop around (http://crooksandliars.com/susie-madrak/rick-santorum-disagrees-catholic-chur)

Q

Q

Qtec
02-12-2012, 06:00 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Catholic leaders and the GOP presidential candidates have <u>intentionally distorted the Obama administration’s new rule requiring employers and insurers to provide reproductive health benefits at no additional cost sharing. Conservatives are seeking a way to politically unite Republican voters around a social issue and portray the regulation as a big government intrusion into religious liberties.</u> In reality, the mandate is modeled on existing rules in six states, exempts houses of worship and other religious nonprofits that primarily employ and serve people of faith, and offers employers a transitional period of one year to determine how best to comply with the rule.

It’s also nothing new. <span style='font-size: 14pt'>Twenty-eight states already require organizations that offer prescription insurance to cover contraception and since 98 percent of Catholic women use birth control, many Catholic institutions offer the benefit to their employees. For instance, a Georgetown University spokesperson told ThinkProgress yesterday that employees “have access to health insurance plans offered and designed by national providers to a national pool. These plans include coverage for birth control.”
</span>
Similarly, an informal survey conducted by Our Sunday Visitor found that many Catholic colleges have purchased insurance plans that provide contraception benefits:

University of Scranton, for example, appears to specifically cover contraception. The University of San Francisco offers employees two health plans, both of which cover abortion, contraception and sterilization…Also problematic is the Jesuit University of Scranton. One of its health insurance plans, the First Priority HMO, lists a benefit of “contraceptives when used for the purpose of birth control.”

DePaul University in Chicago covers birth control in both its fully insured HMO plan and its self-insured PPO plan and excludes “elective abortion,” said spokesman John Holden, adding that the 1,800 employee-university responded to a complaint from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission several years ago and added artificial contraception as a benefit to its Blue Cross PPO.

Christian Brothers University in Memphis, Tenn., offers employee health insurance via the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, a consortium of Christian Bible and other private college and universities. Its plan excludes abortion, but probably covers artificial contraception as a prescription drug, said C. Gregg Conroy, the executive director of the TICUA Benefit Consortium.

Boston College, the six former Caritas Christi Catholic hospitals in Massachusetts, and other Catholic organizations that are located in one of the 28 states that already require employers to provide contraception benefits could have self-insured or stopped offering prescription drug coverage to avoid the mandate — but didn’t do so. Instead, they — like many Catholic hospitals and health care insurers around the country — chose to meet the needs of the overwhelming majority of Catholic women and offer these much needed services.
</div></div>

So why the false outrage?????

Q

LWW
02-12-2012, 07:51 AM
Explain please how you can come to the conclusion that one person has the "HUMAN RIGHT" to take another human right from another person?

LWW
02-12-2012, 08:06 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 14pt'>“With you lining up with the Catholic faith on so many issues, why not the Catholic Church on health care since it is a value and<span style='font-size: 26pt'> a human right</span>?”</span> </div></div>

Get that? A human right!

Q

Q </div></div>

Got it ... a moonbat crazy leftist spews the lie that you want to hear, and your ideological beliefs force you to swallow whatever is put on the spoon by self proclaimed "CROOKS & LIARS" just as your history has taught us to expect.

Now, did you ever question whether or not the claim was true? Of course you didn't.

Is it true?

Maybe you should consult this group? (http://en.gloria.tv/?media=114049)

Got it.

LWW
02-12-2012, 08:11 AM
Maybe we should ask the pope if it's true?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">“By intervening directly and depriving society of its responsibility, the Social Assistance State leads to a loss of human energies and an inordinate increase of public agencies, which are dominated more by bureaucratic ways of thinking than by concern for serving their clients, and which are accompanied by an enormous increase in spending.”
-Pope John Paul II-
Centesimus Annus #48</div></div>

OOPS! The last one says no. (http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/news/viewNews.php?nid=60) And he's on the fast track to becoming a Saint.

Got it.

LWW
02-12-2012, 08:14 AM
But what about the current pope?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">“The State which would provide everything, absorbing everything into itself, would ultimately become a mere bureaucracy incapable of guaranteeing the very thing which the suffering person -every person -needs: namely, loving personal concern. We do not need a State which regulates and controls everything, but a State which, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, generously acknowledges and supports initiatives arising from the different social forces and combines spontaneity with closeness to those in need. … In the end, the claim that just social structures would make works of charity superfluous masks a materialist conception of man: the mistaken notion that man can live ‘by bread alone’ (Mt 4:4; cf. Dt 8:3) - a conviction that demeans man and ultimately disregards all that is specifically human.”
-Pope Benedict XVI-
Deus Caritas Est #28</div></div>

Well I'll be ding - diddly - darned ... he also says it was a spoon fed lie. (http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/news/viewNews.php?nid=60)

Got it.

LWW
02-12-2012, 08:21 AM
So what is the Catholic Church's official position?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 14pt'>The “Right to Health Care” as taught by the Church is a companion to the fundamental right to life, and rights to other necessities, among them food, clothing, and shelter. It may be best understood as a “Right to Acquire the Means of Procuring for One’s Self and One’s Family these goods, and concomitantly, a duty to exercise virtue (diligence, thrift, charity) in every aspect of their acquisition and discharge. This language of rights, coupled with duties toward those who ‘through no fault of their own’ are unable to work, is present throughout papal teaching, and only reinforces the idea that, in its proper perspective, the goal is to live and to work and ‘to be looked after’ only in the event of real necessity.”</span> (Source: Catholic Medical Association, 2004 document, Health Care in America. – bold and italics our own)

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>The right of every individual to access health care does not necessarily suppose an obligation on the part of the government to provide it.</span> Yet in our American culture, Catholic teaching about the “right” to healthcare is sometimes confused with the structures of “entitlement.” <span style='font-size: 14pt'>The teaching of the Universal Church has never been to suggest a government socialization of medical services.</span> Rather, the Church has asserted the rights of every individual to have access to those things most necessary for sustaining and caring for human life, while at the same time insisting on the personal responsibility of each individual to care properly for his or her own health.

Indeed part of the crisis in today’s system stems from various misappropriations within health care insurance systems of exorbitant elective treatments, or the tendencies to regard health care services paid for by insurance as “free,” and to take advantage of services that happen to be available under the insurance plan. Such practices may arguably cripple the ability of small companies to provide necessary opportunities to their employees and significantly increase the cost of health care for everyone. </div></div>

<span style='font-size: 26pt'>OH DEAR! RICK WAS RIGHT! (http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/news/viewNews.php?nid=60)</span>

Got it.

LWW
02-12-2012, 08:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Truth is, Rick et al want to pick and choose what Christian values they want to impose on the rest.

Q </div></div>

Actually ... the truth is that a moonbat crazy leftist either lied, or regurgitated a lie, and "CROOKS & LIARS" obediently repeated the lie followed by you obediently licking the lie from the spoon and then sanctimoniously acting as if you actually knew something when in reality you were simply displaying your undying will to be used as a tool of the regime.

Got it.

Next ridiculous spoon fed myth you would like to have crushed before your very eyes?

Qtec
02-12-2012, 07:56 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> The pope lamented the great inequalities in health care around the globe. While people in many parts of the world aren’t able to receive essential medications or even the most basic care, in industrialized countries there is a risk of “pharmacological, medical and surgical consumerism” that leads to “a cult of the body,” the pope said.

“The care of man, his transcendent dignity and his inalienable rights” are issues that should concern Christians, the pope said.

Because an individual’s health is a “precious asset” to society as well as to himself, governments and other agencies should seek to protect it by “dedicating the equipment, resources and energy so that the greatest number of people can have access.”

In a separate statement, Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, said, “Justice requires guaranteed universal access to health care,” adding that minimal levels of medical care are “a fundamental human right.” “Governments are obligated, therefore, to adopt the proper legislative, administrative and financial measures to provide such care,” the cardinal explained, saying that, “The governments of richer nations with good health care available should practice more solidarity with their own disadvantaged citizens.”

</div></div> link (http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2010/11/19/131348/pope-universal-healthcare/)


Q

LWW
02-13-2012, 03:46 AM
And, again, you accept a truncated and unverified quote spoon fed to you by a moonbat crazy leftist site with a long, broad and deep history of doing exactly this type of thing.

Nothing new here.

The willing ignorant cannot be helped.

Qtec
02-13-2012, 06:23 AM
Her you go Snoopy. take your pick. links (http://www.google.nl/search?q=The+care+of+man%2C+his+transcendent+digni ty+and+his+inalienable+rights&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:nl:official&client=firefox-a)


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Pope, church leaders call for guaranteed health care for all people


http://www.catholicnews.com/images/20100428cnsbr00790_web.jpg

link (http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/1004736.htm)

By Sarah Delaney
<span style='font-size: 17pt'>Catholic News Service</span>

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Pope Benedict XVI and other church leaders said it was the moral responsibility of nations to guarantee access to health care for all of their citizens, regardless of social and economic status or their ability to pay. </div></div>

Q

LWW
02-13-2012, 06:32 AM
Thanks for linking to the same data that Idid.

Oh, wait, you truncated it so that it appears to have a different meaning ... but, you already knew that.

Qtec
02-13-2012, 06:45 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Pope, church leaders call for guaranteed health care for all people


(CNS/Paul Haring)

By Sarah Delaney
Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Pope Benedict XVI and other church leaders said it was the moral responsibility of nations to guarantee access to health care for all of their citizens, regardless of social and economic status or their ability to pay.

Access to adequate medical attention, the pope said in a written message Nov. 18, was one of the "inalienable rights" of man.

The pope's message was read by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, Vatican secretary of state, to participants at the 25th International Conference of the Pontifical Council for Health Care Ministry at the Vatican Nov. 18-19.

The theme of this year's meeting was "Caritas in Veritate - toward an equitable and human health care."

The pope lamented the great inequalities in health care around the globe. While people in many parts of the world aren't able to receive essential medications or even the most basic care, in industrialized countries there is a risk of "pharmacological, medical and surgical consumerism" that leads to "a cult of the body," the pope said.

"The care of man, his transcendent dignity and his inalienable rights" are issues that should concern Christians, the pope said.

Because an individual's health is a "precious asset" to society as well as to himself, governments and other agencies should seek to protect it by "dedicating the equipment, resources and energy so that the greatest number of people can have access."

"Justice in health care should be a priority of governments and international institutions," he said, cautioning that protecting human health does not include euthanasia or promoting artificial reproductive techniques that include the destruction of embryos.

Care for human life from conception to its natural end must be a guiding light in determining health care policy, the pope said.

In his own written statement, Cardinal Bertone had strong words in support of the need for governments to take care of all citizens, especially children, the elderly, the poor and immigrants.

"Justice requires guaranteed universal access to health care," he said, adding that the provision of minimal levels of medical attention to all is "commonly accepted as a fundamental human right." </div></div>

What part did I truncate..and be SPECIFIC or just shut up.

Q

eg8r
02-13-2012, 09:37 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Get that? A human right!
</div></div>What we "get" is that you and the person asking the question are idiots. Health care is absolutely not a basic human right. Thankfully in the US it has been provided for free if needed.

eg8r

eg8r
02-13-2012, 09:37 AM
qtip also thinks it is a basic human right to work and not pay taxes. Well unless you are rich and he wants some of your handout money.

eg8r

Soflasnapper
02-13-2012, 09:41 AM
Here in America, we don't treat it that way, nor do our country's foundations treat it that way.

However, the question here is the social teachings of the RCC, and THEY do indeed say it is.

Soflasnapper
02-13-2012, 09:44 AM
Good linked source for your claim!

And, as the RCC is set up, nothing any prior pope says overrides anything the new pope says on faith and morals, since the pope is infallible when speaking on those subjects ex cathedra.

Not saying that makes sense, but that is how the RCC understands things.

LWW
02-13-2012, 01:57 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Get that? A human right!
</div></div>What we "get" is that you and the person asking the question are idiots. Health care is absolutely not a basic human right. Thankfully in the US it has been provided for free if needed.

eg8r </div></div>

These O-cultists don't even understand what a "RIGHT" is.

Soflasnapper
02-13-2012, 05:09 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Here is what Cardinal Bernadin said in the Gannon Lecture at Fordham University that he delivered in 1983:

Those who defend the right to life of the weakest among us must be equally visible in support of the quality of life of the powerless among us: the old and the young, the hungry and the homeless, the undocumented immigrant and the unemployed worker.

Consistency means that we cannot have it both ways. We cannot urge a compassionate society and vigorous public policy to protect the rights of the unborn and then argue that compassion and significant public programs on behalf of the needy undermine the moral fiber of the society or are beyond the proper scope of governmental responsibility.


This statement [...] came to be taken as authoritative throughout the American Church [...]</div></div>

From a current article (http://ricochet.com/main-feed/American-Catholicism-s-Pact-With-the-Devil) that Rush talked about at length today: American Catholicism's Pact with the Devil, by Paul Rahe, published at the richocet.com site.

A notice at the top of the linked page:

Welcome dittoheads! Please bear with us while we sort out this incredible 'Rush' of traffic.

LWW
02-13-2012, 06:39 PM
What is the "AMERICAN CHURCH" of which you speak?