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Qtec
03-28-2012, 03:12 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Shock waves from comets bombarding the Earth may have helped to build proteins and set the stage for life, scientists have learned.

Comets, giant snowballs of ice and dust, are known to have carried organic chemicals and water to the early Earth.

But just what caused life to spring out of nowhere on a barren and desolate planet billions of years ago remains a mystery.

Now scientists may have part of the answer. Laboratory experiments have shown that amino acids - organic molecules that are the building blocks of proteins - would have survived violent comet impacts.

What is more, the shock of a large comet impact would have provided the energy needed to start bonding amino acids together to make proteins.

Proteins provide the raw material that allows all living things, from microbes to humans, to exist and function.

Their creation by comets may explain how life appeared so quickly at the end of a period 3.8 billion years ago called the "late heavy bombardment". During this turbulent time the Earth was showered by both comets and rocky asteroids, leaving crater scars that are still seen on the Moon. </div></div>

link (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/comets-linked-to-beginnings-of-life-7593751.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">"Comets really would have been the ideal packages for delivering ingredients for the chemical evolution thought to have resulted in life. We like the comet delivery scenario because it includes all of the ingredients for life - amino acids, water and energy." </div></div>



Q

Qtec
03-28-2012, 03:26 AM
If the experiment had proved the opposite, Creationists would be linking to it on every RW website as proof that life must had started on Earth.

Q

eg8r
03-28-2012, 07:07 AM
Where did the comets come from? Where did the chemical ingredients come from that were travelling with the comets come from?

eg8r

eg8r
03-28-2012, 07:08 AM
Quite the contrary. Proof that comets delivered the "chemical ingredients" needed for life on Earth do not discount anything in the Bible. God did not give us every detail on how we were created. He only said that he created us.

eg8r

cushioncrawler
03-28-2012, 07:10 AM
First, the earth and life evolved.
Then, God woz created.
mac.

LWW
03-30-2012, 03:16 AM
Must you constantly display your ignorance for all to see?

What you are posting is called the panspermia hypothesis, which actually holds up quite well.

It presents no evidence that this was the source of the creation of life in the universe, but that it was merely the vehicle used to disperse it.

My suggestion to you ... read a book.

Qtec
03-30-2012, 08:15 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Where did the comets come from? Where did the chemical ingredients come from that were travelling with the comets come from?

eg8r </div></div>

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Organic Molecule, Amino Acid-Like, Found In Constellation Sagittarius

ScienceDaily (Mar. 26, 2008) Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn have detected for the first time a molecule closely related to an amino acid: amino acetonitrile. The organic molecule was found with a 30 metre radio telescope in Spain and two radio interferometers in France and Australia in the "Large Molecule Heimat", a giant gas cloud near the galactic centre in the constellation Sagittarius (Astronomy & Astrophysics, in press).

The "Large Molecule Heimat" is a very dense, hot gas clump within the star forming region Sagittarius B2. In this source of only 0,3 light-year diameter, which is heated by a deeply embedded newly formed star, most of the interstellar molecules known to date have been found, including the most complex ones such as ethyl alcohol, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, glycol aldehyde (a basic sugar), and ethylene glycol. </div></div>

Q

eg8r
03-30-2012, 08:29 AM
I guess I can give you a little more rope...Where did the "Organic Molecule, Amino Acid-Like, Found In Constellation Sagittarius" come from?

eg8r

LWW
03-30-2012, 04:09 PM
He's not even the sharpest dull knife in the drawer.

Soflasnapper
03-30-2012, 05:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Must you constantly display your ignorance for all to see?

What you are posting is called the panspermia hypothesis, which actually holds up quite well.

It presents no evidence that this was the source of the creation of life in the universe, but that it was merely the vehicle used to disperse it.

My suggestion to you ... read a book. </div></div>

Your incorrect 'corrections' are always amusing to see, as is true in this case.

Panspermia involves the actual transfer of living organisms (spores, bacteria, etc.), not the carbon based building blocks of proteins in organic compounds or amino acids.

Your howling error here is similar to a post complaining about spelling that itself contains misspells.

So, how about an admission of your idiocy on this point? (rolling eyes, sighing)

Qtec
04-02-2012, 05:20 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Your howling error here is similar to a post complaining about spelling that itself contains misspells </div></div>

That's why he has no comeback.

I thought the real point of my post was this,

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">What is more, the shock of a large comet impact would have provided the energy needed to start bonding amino acids together to make proteins.

Proteins provide the raw material that allows all living things, from microbes to humans, to exist and function. </div></div>

Did a comet provide the spark of life?

Q

Soflasnapper
04-02-2012, 09:17 AM
Yes, the surprise is that comet collision energy would help create, rather than help destroy, peptide chains.

That's the opposite of what I thought (and I still have a problem with it), but I take the experimental findings to be real.

Clearly enough, this theory of how life got going on this planet doesn't mean all life that exists in the universe is here, or started that way. It's also true that if this were a discussion of panspermia, if life here got seeded that way from elsewhere, this only pushes the question of the origin of life to another further removed step.

It's a shame that an interesting topic is instead the cause of heated personal attacks, and hilarious that they are so mistaken themselves!

http://images.hugi.is/box/113782.gif

llotter
04-02-2012, 07:28 PM
The definition I found comes down on the side of LWW, so you should be a bit more humble, methinks.

Soflasnapper
04-03-2012, 10:03 AM
For panspermia?

Not that I recall, and not when I re-checked, but I'd appreciate a link to support your claim.

Since LWW's able to look at anything you or I could find, it's curious then that he hasn't cited something back on this, if that is so.

llotter
04-03-2012, 10:22 AM
The theory that life on the earth originated from microorganisms or chemical precursors of life present in outer space and able to initiate life on reaching a suitable environment

http://www.google.com/search?source=dict-chrome-ex&defl=en&hl=en&q=panspermia&tbo=1&tbs=dfn:1

LWW
04-03-2012, 10:48 AM
I don't think his internet uses the google.

Soflasnapper
04-03-2012, 10:50 AM
One citation mentions that secondarily to the version I mentioned, and the other 10 or so agree with my version, without mentioning anything about precursors.