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DiabloViejo
05-03-2012, 10:41 PM
The Greatness of Laissez-Faire Capitalism
Class Warfare Exists (http://www.classwarfareexists.com/the-greatness-of-laissez-faire-capitalism/)

There was a time when “smaller government” existed; the idea of trickle down economics was a superior success giving titans of industry such as Andrew Carnegie, JP Morgan and John D. Rockefeller the ability to make riches never before seen by any man and influence in government that we can only wish our wealthiest billionaires to have. This led of course to great prosperity among the middle class. <sarcasm/> And by prosperity – I mean…a terrible nightmare.

The beauty of “smaller government” at work – PBS has the history on Andrew Carnegie in a time where regulations really didn’t exist: HERE. (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/sfeature/mf_steelworker.html)

<span style="color: #000099">The life of a 19th-century steel worker was grueling. Twelve-hour shifts, seven days a week. Carnegie gave his workers a single holiday-the Fourth of July; for the rest of the year they worked like draft animals. "Hard! I guess it's hard," said a laborer at the Homestead mill. "I lost forty pounds the first three months I came into this business. It sweats the life out of a man. I often drink two buckets of water during twelve hours; the sweat drips through my sleeves, and runs down my legs and fills my shoes."

For many the work went without a break; others managed to find a few minutes here and there. "We stop only the time it takes to oil the engine," a stop of three to five minutes, said William McQuade, a plate-mill worker in 1893. "While they are oiling they eat, at least some of the boys, some of them; a great many of them in the mill do not carry anything to eat at all, because they haven't got time to eat.

The demanding conditions sapped the life from workers. "You don't notice any old men here," said a Homestead laborer in 1894. "The long hours, the strain, and the sudden changes of temperature use a man up." Sociologist John A. Fitch called it "old age at forty."

For his trouble, the average worker in 1890 received about 10 dollars a week, just above the poverty line of 500 dollars a year. It took the wages of nearly 4,000 steelworkers to match the earnings of Andrew Carnegie.
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eg8r
05-03-2012, 11:05 PM
LOL, and communist Russia was the beauty of "big government" at work. I prefer people being able to earn their wealth than what the commies offered.

eg8r

DiabloViejo
05-03-2012, 11:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">LOL, and communist Russia was the beauty of "big government" at work. I prefer people being able to earn their wealth than what the commies offered.

eg8r </div></div>

This has nothing to do with communist Russia and you know it.
Nice try at the old "red herring" but you failed.

LWW
05-04-2012, 04:27 AM
Why did they work there then?

LWW
05-04-2012, 04:29 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: DiabloViejo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">LOL, and communist Russia was the beauty of "big government" at work. I prefer people being able to earn their wealth than what the commies offered.

eg8r </div></div>

This has nothing to do with communist Russia and you know it.
Nice try at the old "red herring" but you failed. </div></div>

It most certainly does.

You are, deceitfully, trying to condemn that era by comparing it to the mechanized higher tech era of today.

An honest comparison would be to compare it to a similar age with similar technology.

llotter
05-04-2012, 05:47 AM
laissez-faire capitalism is what the economic system is called when people are free to pursue their individual goals and solve their own problems without the arbitrary interference of the State. It is this ultimate efficient system that we have to thank for being the leader of the free world and it is the demise of this great system that we have to thank for the Great Decline we are now watching.

eg8r
05-04-2012, 07:11 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">This has nothing to do with communist Russia and you know it.
</div></div>LOL, you suffer qtip's problem, you open your hole before you read. I did not say it had anything to do with communist Russia. I was pointing out the two differences between big and small government. It appears you cannot tell the difference even when the realities are so bold a child could understand.

eg8r

Soflasnapper
05-04-2012, 10:55 AM
Laissez-faire failed so miserably (as of the Great Depression) that across the western world, here and in Europe, both fascism and communism arose as viable alternatives in the eyes of many of the people.

In order to save a private capitalistic system, both Europe and the US turned to a mixed economy with safeguards and safety net programs, adopting and co-opting much of the socialist or communist social agendas. Out of self-defense of the private capitalist system, which endured as modified.

Europe's social welfare states were far more generous than the US's more bare-bones version, but both were put in place out of perceived necessity.

It's not unlike how businesses began to offer the kinds of work conditions and benefits that labor unions were winning for their membership, out of concern that otherwise, their own workforce would unionize. So we got the 40 hour work week, standard, time and half pay for overtime, wage and labor laws, vacation days, etc., which the capitalists were not in a mood to offer before, out of the push from the unions and the need to counter it.