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View Full Version : A FOUR HUNDRED BREAK CUE!



Sid_Vicious
05-06-2012, 02:23 PM
Seriously folks, what the-F would possibly make any break stick worth this much, for that fact, for even half this much? We ain't talking about a vintage collectors item either, it is production. Hell I will buy the exact same play cue and use it as a breaker before I'd spend this kind of money on a simple break stick. This is a local, at best B+ player buying one which sent to the internet to see that retail is indeed above 4-hundred.

It is foolish, just foolish...sid

Rich R.
05-06-2012, 05:43 PM
It would help if we knew exactly what break cue it is.
Also, is it strictly a break cue or is it a jump/break.

Sid_Vicious
05-06-2012, 08:24 PM
It is a Mezz BJ. Google indeed shows them in the 400 dollar range. sid

Fran Crimi
05-07-2012, 07:08 AM
You found a Mezz break-jump cue for only $400? I can't find one for less than $600.

Sid_Vicious
05-07-2012, 03:22 PM
I find them all over in Google for $400 range. I still don't see how any break cue rates for $400 though. Tell me Fran...what makes a break stick pay for itself at that price? sid

Rich R.
05-07-2012, 08:26 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I find them all over in Google for $400 range. I still don't see how any break cue rates for $400 though. Tell me Fran...what makes a break stick pay for itself at that price? sid </div></div>
You're going to have to be more specific about which cue you are referring to. If you're referring to the Mezz Dual Force jump/break cue, I'm with Fran. I couldn't find one for under $600. If you're referring to another Mezz break cue, some can be had for $400 or so.

What makes them worth $400? You would probably have to ask Mezz that question.

Frankly, if it is made from well seasoned wood, that will stay straight after a long period of time, and it is a solid build, the cue is probably worth $400.
I have a couple of jump/break cues and I paid more than $300 for each of them a number of years ago. Considering inflation, they are both easily worth more than $400.

The real question here is why don't you believe they are worth $400.

In the end, the bottom line is, if you don't think they are worth $400, don't buy one.

Sid_Vicious
05-08-2012, 12:27 PM
"You're going to have to be more specific about which cue you are referring to. If you're referring to the Mezz Dual Force jump/break cue, I'm with Fran. I couldn't find one for under $600. If you're referring to another Mezz break cue, some can be had for $400 or so."

Oh, I won't buy one. A single snapper cue for breaks with a possible added jump event??? I have no need for either. I have a great(CHEAP) JC, and other breakers as well, but choose to break with the play cue, or a wall stick. IMMHO...a $400 breaker is stupid money to spend.

NOW, after saying this...you tell me Rich, or Fran, or anyone..."What can a $400 BCue do to pay for itself" that a wall stick or the average break cue won't do? Nobody has told me this, which is WHY I asked. sid

"What makes them worth $400? You would probably have to ask Mezz that question."

I am asking the players Dude. You wanna ask a car salesman why his is the best...NOT!

"Frankly, if it is made from well seasoned wood, that will stay straight after a long period of time, and it is a solid build, the cue is probably worth $400."

Smacking a CB in a break shot needs not to to be straight unless the cue is a bananna.

"I have a couple of jump/break cues and I paid more than $300 for each of them a number of years ago. Considering inflation, they are both easily worth more than $400."

You won't sell me one.

"The real question here is why don't you believe they are worth $400."

Cuz breakers are a sellers hype.

"In the end, the bottom line is, if you don't think they are worth $400, don't buy one."

I won't buy one. I seriously doubt that anyone here will ever take enough of my extra cash, simply because they have a 4-to-6 hundred dollar break stick. General players should not be swayed into thinking spending this kind of money on a simple, single purpose cue, is, IS, Izzz, or is EVER, a priority for 4-600 bucks outlay. It just ain't. As Ricky Recardo would say, 'Slain to me how it does' sid

Fran Crimi
05-08-2012, 02:37 PM
I'm only just starting to do research on it for myself. Up until now, I've been breaking with a playing cue that I no longer use for playing. I have heard that the new construction break cues do help provide a more powerful break so they are helpful for those who believe in breaking hard.

I don't know if there are any benefits with the new style break cues to the medium to soft breakers out there. By 'breaker' I mean the person.

I don't believe in referring to cues as 'breakers' or 'players.' I believe that the people who created those terms were too lazy to say two words: Break cue or playing cue. I think we need to stop it before it becomes part of the mainstream pool lingo, like 'race to 100' did as an incorrect term for a 100 point game of 14.1 ---- But I digress ----.

Rich R.
05-08-2012, 03:58 PM
Sid, by the tone of your post, I doubt there is a damn thing I could say that would convince you that a break cue, or a jump/break cue, is worth $400 or more. We obviously have different opinions on this subject. Maybe you are correct. I won't argue the point. Everyone is entitled to spend their money as they want. All I can say is that I am happy with the two jump/break cues I have and I will be keeping them for a long time. They probably don't do a thing for my game but I'm good with that. It doesn't really mean much.

Sid_Vicious
05-08-2012, 09:59 PM
Sorry for the tone Rich. I should have simply asked, "Do you seriously feel that your 400 dollar break cue will pay for itself in competition, above and beyond snapping with even a simple wall stick?" IMO, the 1-90% of general shooters are fools for spending good folding money on one of these multi hundred dollar break cues. BUT I will admit I have a small arsenal of over priced cues, including a few BJ cues. Nothing even approaching 4 hundred though. Common sense has to come into play at some point in time. sid

Rich R.
05-09-2012, 04:45 AM
Sid, the bottom line is that, as amateurs, our play will probably never pay for any of our cues. Mine certainly won't because I haven't gambled on pool for many years. I have bought a number of cues mostly because I like the look and feel but I don't expect any payback from them. If we all based our cue purchases on the payback we would receive, most of us would be using house sticks.

Bambu
05-09-2012, 07:43 AM
I paid around 350 for a predator bk2, no complaints here. I have a cheap lucasi jump/break which is pretty bad. The stiff taper of a good break cue does do something. You can feel the solidity of a mezz or predator break cue as compared with cheaper models. So its not just the tip alone(though a solid house cue with a hard tip works pretty good.)

It wont pay for itself, but a good breaker saves money on your regular cue tip replacement. And then, you cant put a price on a little extra oomph in your break. Say you hang a 9 ball in the pocket, you never know when a tiny bit might change things.

Sid_Vicious
05-11-2012, 10:20 PM
I agree, and at the same time I have to say that personaly, if I considered a pricey purchase of a single purpose cue...I'd have to believe that it would buy me a winning game in a cash game or in a crunch tournament set. I have one of Jerty Powers' Thumpers, a McDermott Breaker, and you know what breaks best for me? My play cue, or a simple Falcon Sneaky pete I bought simply because of experiences I had with that SP for breaking when borrowing it from a friend.

I just think we have stepped over the edge of common sense to let ourselves get hoop-la'd into $400+ break cue mentality, unless the cue has some collector's value down the road. Otherwise I can not understand why anyone would pay that kind of money for a simple snapper. OK, case closed, I'll stop. sid

Sid_Vicious
05-11-2012, 10:27 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I paid around 350 for a predator bk2, no complaints here. I have a cheap lucasi jump/break which is pretty bad. The stiff taper of a good break cue does do something. You can feel the solidity of a mezz or predator break cue as compared with cheaper models. So its not just the tip alone(though a solid house cue with a hard tip works pretty good.)

It wont pay for itself, but a good breaker saves money on your regular cue tip replacement. And then, you cant put a price on a little extra oomph in your break. Say you hang a 9 ball in the pocket, you never know when a tiny bit might change things.

</div></div>

I have to answer this statement, "Say you hang a 9 ball in the pocket, you never know when a tiny bit might change things."

We are getting off the subject a little but I have seen and made as many 9s or more 9s with a good controlled medium break shot. Having an extra umph on the snap hasn't really inpressed me as the end all for 9-ball snaps. If I were to consider a hanging 9B after a snap and deciding on buying a bigger break cue, then I'd be buying a new one every week. I just don't think that dog will hunt. sid

Rich R.
05-12-2012, 07:26 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I just think we have stepped over the edge of common sense to let ourselves get hoop-la'd into $400+ break cue mentality, unless the cue has some collector's value down the road. Otherwise I can not understand why anyone would pay that kind of money for a simple snapper. OK, case closed, I'll stop. sid </div></div>
Sid, I know you said you are done but I have to respond to this point.

Most of us here are playing pool as a hobby, not a job. IMHO, when it comes to a hobby, there is no common sense. It is a case of the "I want" vs the "I need".

Cars are a hobby for some people. Does some guy "need" to work on a car until it has 800 horse power and can run a quarter mile in seconds. Hell no! He doesn't "need" it, he "wants" it. For most of the average home mechanics, that car is a money pit, aka hobby.

To play pool, you "need" a pool cue, which, frankly, most poolrooms provide on the wall of the room. None of us really "need" to buy pool cues. We "want" to buy pool cues. Honestly, I have actually seen a player run racks of 9-ball with the legendary broom handle. So you don't "need" a pool cue. On the other hand, I know an APA sl-2 who plays with a cue worth about $3K. No, it doesn't make an sense but that is none of anyone's business. It is a hobby.

Do we "need" to buy cues to play pool? For most of us, the answer is no.
Do we "need" a $400 break or jump/break cue. Again, for most of us, the answer is no.
Do we "want" to buy cues, both playing cues and break cues, your damn right we do. We all choose what we "want" to buy and what not to buy but we all buy. There is no common sense to any of it and that is what makes an enjoyable hobby. I would never tell anyone what to buy or not buy when it comes to their hobby.

Bambu
05-12-2012, 08:14 AM
Well I cant argue that, Sid. If you dont break hard, theres really no point in buying an expensive break cue. I like what Rich said too: Do we "want" to buy cues, both playing cues and break cues, your damn right we do.

Sid_Vicious
05-12-2012, 01:13 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Well I cant argue that, Sid. If you dont break hard, theres really no point in buying an expensive break cue. I like what Rich said too: Do we "want" to buy cues, both playing cues and break cues, your damn right we do. </div></div>

I break just as hard with my play cue as I do with any break cue. I currently have a stack of pool cues I have bought out of "early groupie pool fever" that I can't sell now for 30 cents on the dollar, and they are all in pristene condition.

Yea, we buy because we WANT to buy. I just feel that readers of the board here should realize the hype-factor, and this 4-600 dollar break stick has to be one good "bad example."

Cue's values go to cr@p on day 2, so if the thing doesn't jump and dance...you will lose value the second you buy it. sid

Bambu
05-12-2012, 01:48 PM
I never consider resale value unless the item costs thousands. But if I was to sell my bk2 I could still get 200 back outta the 350 I spent. Like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Predator-BK2-no-...=item3f17498ca7 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Predator-BK2-no-wrap-w-joint-protectors-/270973635751?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f17498ca7)

To me, $3000 custom cues are hype.

Rich R.
05-13-2012, 07:41 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Well I cant argue that, Sid. If you dont break hard, theres really no point in buying an expensive break cue. I like what Rich said too: Do we "want" to buy cues, both playing cues and break cues, your damn right we do. </div></div>

I break just as hard with my play cue as I do with any break cue. I currently have a stack of pool cues I have bought out of "early groupie pool fever" that I can't sell now for 30 cents on the dollar, and they are all in pristene condition.
<span style="color: #FF0000">I think the value of your cues depends a lot on what cues you bought. I have at least 6 or 7 good playing cues with a range of purchase prices. I can sell everyone of them today for at least what I paid for them and a few for considerably more. </span>
Yea, we buy because we WANT to buy. I just feel that readers of the board here should realize the hype-factor, and this 4-600 dollar break stick has to be one good "bad example."

Cue's values go to cr@p on day 2, so if the thing doesn't jump and dance...you will lose value the second you buy it. sid </div></div>
<span style="color: #FF0000">As with playing cues, it depends what break cues you buy. I hate to sound like a broken record but I have two jump/break cues, each costing more than $300 originally, a number of years ago, and I could sell either one of them for more today. In fact, just the other day I got an offer on one of them.

You really can't talk about the value of cues in general terms. Value is very specific to each cue and it has nothing to do with how it functions. The function of any cue has more to do with the person than the cue. </span>

Rich R.
05-13-2012, 07:50 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I never consider resale value unless the item costs thousands. But if I was to sell my bk2 I could still get 200 back outta the 350 I spent. Like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Predator-BK2-no-...=item3f17498ca7 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Predator-BK2-no-wrap-w-joint-protectors-/270973635751?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f17498ca7)

To me, $3000 custom cues are hype. </div></div>
Bambu, I have to ask what "hype" you are referring to when it comes to $3000 custom cues. Although a lot of hype is common with the production cue companies, I don't think I have ever heard the maker of a $3000 custom cue claim anything except that the cue plays as well as his other cues and it looks good.

Anyone who believes a $3000 cue will make them play better is only fooling themselves. You don't buy a $3000 cue to make yourself play better. You buy that cue because you really like the way it looks. It is more than just a pool cue. It is a work of art.

Bambu
05-13-2012, 05:51 PM
Thats all I meant, looks wont help your game. A $400 break cue would serve one better, especially dollar for dollar.

Rich R.
05-13-2012, 06:52 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bambu</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Thats all I meant, looks wont help your game. A $400 break cue would serve one better, especially dollar for dollar. </div></div>
I'm happy we agree. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

Fran Crimi
05-14-2012, 07:28 AM
I'm not so sure I agree 100% with you guys on the value of certain $3,000 cues. Putting myself in the shoes of a cuemaker: If I was going to construct a cue to sell for 3k, I would start with the best quailty from beginning to end. That would include choosing a perfectly aged piece of wood, with a grain that maximizes solidity and quailty that would insure the least probability of warpage. I would include two shafts as standard and match the same wood for both. I would go the extra yard in quality control in getting the specs just perfect, including making sure the balance point is exactly where I want it, and so-on...

I guess there are some cuemakers out there who might start with their standard quality and then lay on the fancy inlay work and call it a high-end cue. And there are some consumers who are satisfied with that because they don't know the difference. But not all cuemakers or consumers think that way.

Rich R.
05-14-2012, 07:59 AM
Fran, I think the really good custom cue makers do all of the things you mention as a standard practice. Of course, there is some variation in the woods but they only use the very top quality woods before they even consider any inlays. I've been told that the good cue makers actually throw a lot of wood away because it doesn't meet their standards when they start working with it. That is one of the reasons why their cues are so expensive.

I have three cues by one particular maker. Two of them have inlays and one doesn't. They are all made with the best of woods and, although they are a number of years old, none of them show any signs of warpage. I know for a fact that this cue maker is very finicky about his cues and he would never let anything go out of his shop if he thought it was sub par. I have also dealt with other cue makers who work the same way.

To refer back to the original thread, this attention to detail and quality of material may be what makes a break cue worth $400.

Sid_Vicious
05-14-2012, 09:36 AM
"To refer back to the original thread, this attention to detail and quality of material may be what makes a break cue worth $400"

But isn't Mezz just a production cue, not custom? As a production cue line, Lucasi has been one of the best values, and made in China, and you could buy many of those for under $200 for a long time. Lucasi never got their due respect IMO because it had a Chinese label.

Maybe the manufacturer of the $400 Mezz breaker does focus in material selection. I tried the jump part and wasn't impressed though. The cue does look good in person.

I can't remember...has anyone here worked with a Mezz breaker? I assume Fran has. What impressions has it made? sid

Fran Crimi
05-14-2012, 11:11 AM
A pro was kind enough to let me play with his Mezz playing cue for a while, just to try out a Mezz cue, and I have to say I was impressed. I haven't had a chance to check out their break cues yet but I imagine they would be similarly good. I wouldn't consider buying a b/j cue because I'm very happy with my Bunjee jump cue.

I think that with certain brands of production cues, like Mezz and Predator, what you are paying for is their formula for their LD shafts that is patented --- Epecially with Predator, any cue maker who tries to copy them will find a lawyers letter waiting for them, pronto.

Sid_Vicious
05-14-2012, 02:24 PM
Thanks. I own a Mezz player and really like it. I would like to add an ounce of weight to mine, and get it to 19.5+, even 20oz. I'll probably just sell it back to the guy I bought it from...haven't decided. I paid 400 for the play cue. sid

Rich R.
05-15-2012, 04:52 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sid_Vicious</div><div class="ubbcode-body">"To refer back to the original thread, this attention to detail and quality of material may be what makes a break cue worth $400"

But isn't Mezz just a production cue, not custom? As a production cue line, Lucasi has been one of the best values, and made in China, and you could buy many of those for under $200 for a long time. Lucasi never got their due respect IMO because it had a Chinese label.

Maybe the manufacturer of the $400 Mezz breaker does focus in material selection. I tried the jump part and wasn't impressed though. The cue does look good in person.

I can't remember...has anyone here worked with a Mezz breaker? I assume Fran has. What impressions has it made? sid </div></div>
I really wasn't referring to one specific brand of cue. Actually, at the time I wrote the response, I was thinking more of my own jump/break cues.

I don't have any personal experience with a Mezz cue of any kind. However, from what I have been told, they may be a step above many other production cues.

Tampa Kathy
05-20-2012, 07:05 PM
I never bothered with a separate break cue. I'd use one off the wall. I had a McDermott for a while but it didn't seem to fit me. Then I did get a custom cue to play with. The first one was a Wayne Gunn 20 oz, no points, just a solid color in front of the wrap. Someone eventually stole that while I was working at a pool room here in Tampa. Then I got another custom, also 20 oz, tulip wood on front of the wrap, rosewood behind the wrap. Both were very solid for years.

nAz
05-23-2012, 09:20 PM
Hey Sid... that is a lot i don't think its worth it.
I have broken plenty of times with a friends Predator ($450+?)Break cue. i have to say it does a good job as long as i hit the CB true and at the object ball (headball) but that is true of any solid cue... house cues included.

Right now i break with my billiard cue when i do play, (very rare now a days)that does a great job but again i gotta hit that CB true. also this type of cue can take the stress of breaking as hard as you can hit the CB. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif