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View Full Version : Finishing After A "Glory" Shot



Sid_Vicious
10-01-2002, 01:51 PM
Ok, you've just performed a monumental, have-to shot, probably a couple notches above your talent level and you have the rest of the table waiting for a connect-the-dots for a win. How do you cope with the adrenalin after that "ESPN Shot Of The Match" that you just made? I'm sure I am not alone in this bad trait of doggin' an easier ball right afterwards, has anyone devised or discovered how to seamlessly finish after such a scenario???sid

SPetty
10-01-2002, 02:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> How do you cope with the adrenalin after that "ESPN Shot Of The Match" that you just made? <hr></blockquote>C'mon Sid, you know the answer to this one! You just take a few deep breaths, then rely on your "carved-in-stone" preshot routine that you use on each and every one of your shots. How'd I do, Tom In Cincy?

10-01-2002, 02:18 PM
It should be enough to just go through the same pre-shot routine you always do. But being human, sometimes that doesn't cut it. Sometimes we need a brief moment to settle down. So you can try this to get a tiny bit of time to help you calm down...

Calmly walk back to your chair and take a drink of water. (What? You don't have a glass of water at your chair? Big mistake.) Then calmly walk back to the table, and go through the exact same pre-shot routine you always do.

On a similar note, there is something I do when my opponent is running out, I'm not expecting to get a shot again, and then he surprises me (and anyone else that's watching) by missing a shot he really should make...

Instead of giving into the surprise, jumping out of the chair (OH BOY! I DIDN'T THINK I WAS GOING TO GET TO THE TABLE AGAIN!), and running up to the table...I instead will sit there for several seconds. I will SIT there in my chair for several seconds, looking at the layout of the table, and thinking of what I am going to do to either run out or play safe. After about 5 or 6 seconds of sitting in the chair looking at the table and thinking, I'll get up and calmly walk to the table, in a much more calm and settled state than I would have been in if I had jumped up and ran to the table. Sitting for 5 or 6 seconds after the shot is missed isn't the awkwardly long pause that you might think. After all, it'll take the opponent at least 2 or 3 seconds to get back to the chair. And often, they will stand at the table for a couple of seconds, in a state of disbelief at the shot that they just missed.

Tom_In_Cincy
10-01-2002, 02:23 PM
SPetty,

Absoulely Perfect..

Remember 3 phases to every shot..

1. Pre-Shot routine

2. Trust what you are about to do

3. Accept the results

Once the shot is over.. its over.. ESPN Shot or not.. your next shot is the most important one you'll ever have..

Sid_Vicious
10-01-2002, 02:59 PM
My preshot routine, when working, has no part of my conscious thoughts. If I address a ball in any particular "think my preshot routine" to be the same...I just asked for trouble and that's exactly what I get. I'm gonna CYA a little and add that I saw Cory Duel(sp?) kick in a spectacular shot once, followed by a chump shot almost anyone could make on any given day. I feel like this is de'ja vu,,,sure you want to proceed without a change in methodology in mechanics. The secret is "How do you turn off the mental dragons, even the ones telling you to think through the pre shot routine, and NOT miss??? Sid

Karatemom
10-01-2002, 03:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Mike:</font><hr> Calmly walk back to your chair and take a drink of water. (What? You don't have a glass of water at your chair? Big mistake.) Then calmly walk back to the table, and go through the exact same pre-shot routine you always do.

On a similar note, there is something I do when my opponent is running out, I'm not expecting to get a shot again, and then he surprises me (and anyone else that's watching) by missing a shot he really should make...

Instead of giving into the surprise, jumping out of the chair (OH BOY! I DIDN'T THINK I WAS GOING TO GET TO THE TABLE AGAIN!), and running up to the table...I instead will sit there for several seconds. I will SIT there in my chair for several seconds, looking at the layout of the table, and thinking of what I am going to do to either run out or play safe. After about 5 or 6 seconds of sitting in the chair looking at the table and thinking, I'll get up and calmly walk to the table, in a much more calm and settled state than I would have been in if I had jumped up and ran to the table. Sitting for 5 or 6 seconds after the shot is missed isn't the awkwardly long pause that you might think. After all, it'll take the opponent at least 2 or 3 seconds to get back to the chair. And often, they will stand at the table for a couple of seconds, in a state of disbelief at the shot that they just missed. <hr></blockquote>

I was in this situation last night, Mike, and did both of the above. I always have something to drink at the table I'm playing on. As a matter of fact, it is normal to see me carrying around either a coke or orange juice on tourney night at all times. I made quite a good shot on the 5 and drew the cb back to pocket the 9 in the corner. That got my blood pumping and had to find someway to calm down. I don't normally sit down during any of my matches, so I got a good dose of orange juice and finished my win. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

On the other point, I played a guy who is just a little better than myself. The score was hill-hill. I fully expected him to run the last 4 balls on the table for the simple fact that they were wide open and 2 were in the hole! Well, he got down to the 8 and jarred it. I got lucky! Instead of hopping right out of my seat, (this match was much later in the evening, I was tired and have been fighting a cold so I had to sit down at some point, LOL), I sat there for several seconds and took a deep breath. Then I sank the 8 and then, although a little shaky, the 9 for the win.

Composure definitely is a key factor in this game.

Heide ~ moved right on up to a 5

10-01-2002, 03:56 PM
Sid, I understand what you're asking. You're in the middle of a game and you have just executed one of the most spectacular shots ever to be seen on a pool table. Now, you're left with a relatively simple out, which under normal circumstances you can execute with your eyes closed. But now you have to play stunned and amazed and excited. Now how do you control your emotions and not dog the easy out? My only recommendation I can give you is that when I do something like this, first, ignore the congrats and applause which may be coming from friends and associates... second, before I even look at my next shot, I walk around the table at least once. The slow walk helps bring my emotions under control and it forces me to look at the table and make sure that I know what shot I want to take and how I want to take it. If I still feel a little charged after my walk, I'll go and walk to the piece of chalk the furthest away from me and go and chalk my cue. All this is to help me to calm my nerves and slow the adreniline flow coursing through my veins so I can concentrate fully on the job at hand, running out... Or if all else fails, just get used to making the amazing shots and soon, no one shot will ever seem more amazing than any other one... Good luck

Ross
10-02-2002, 10:47 AM
At the Open, I noticed that every time Alex Pagulayan made a great shot, he would walk over to his table and do the "bridge hand talcum powder dip." I thought that was a clever routine to give himself a few extra seconds to calm down and to be able to look away from the crowd and get himself focused. I think I will try that myself, although I don't normally use talcum.

10-02-2002, 11:38 AM
Try my method, then: Walk over and take a drink of water. I don't use talcum powder, either. So its water for me.

10-02-2002, 12:01 PM
Well, if you make one glory shot a year, you'll probably miss the shot right after it. If you only get to the 8 ball once a week in your 9 ball league, you'll probably choke on the nine.

Maybe you should practice s'more? Forget your comparison to Corey Duel. There is no comparison.

10-06-2002, 09:18 AM
Ok, you've just performed a monumental, have-to shot, probably a couple notches above your talent level and you have the rest of the table waiting for a connect-the-dots for a win. How do you cope with the adrenalin after that "ESPN Shot Of The Match" that you just made? I'm sure I am not alone in this bad trait of doggin' an easier ball right afterwards, has anyone devised or discovered how to seamlessly finish after such a scenario???sid
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I just realize that miracle shots DO happen, and they happen to everyone. Take a little more time to gain my composure and just think "ok, now I just have to run out.."

The danger is thinking that ANY shot is "above your talent level" because the craziest shots can happen to the worst players on earth.. all you have to do is hit the ball right, and it'll do what you want.. or sometimes not what you wanted, but will still fall. Either way, I think it's best to lose the attitude that you "made a shot you shouldn't have made due to your skill level.." thinking. That is what'll make you mess up afterwards.

Vicki
10-06-2002, 05:48 PM
I just go ahead after that spectacular shot and celebrate it a little. Get it out! If you make a great shot jump up and down, give yourself a little whoo-hoo, and do the Tiger Woods arm pump. Then take a minute to settle yoursef before you get down on the next shot. Holding it in only makes you tense when you shoot the next ball. There's no sense trying to be cool about it. Everyone will celebrate with you and that feels good.

Vicki