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Sev
06-14-2012, 04:22 PM
It must be killing Obama he cant take any credit for it.

Private land. Private sector.

3% unemployment.
5 billion dollar surplus with an estimated additional 1.5 billion to be added each year for the next 2 years and further out as the boom continues.
Average salary is $79,000.00 if I heard correctly.

eg8r
06-15-2012, 01:32 AM
There is a man at my church that works in North Dakota 3 months out of the year and brings home anywhere from $90k to $120k. The difference is based solely on how hard he wants to work at getting around weigh stations and fooling around on his logbook. His family can survive on $90k/year so he works for 3 months takes 9 months off every year.

eg8r

Sev
06-15-2012, 05:45 AM
Thought about going up there myself. Winter is brutal up there though and I would imagine that is when the biggest hiring time is.

cushioncrawler
06-15-2012, 08:10 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">There is a man at my church that works in North Dakota 3 months out of the year and brings home anywhere from $90k to $120k. The difference is based solely on how hard he wants to work at getting around weigh stations and fooling around on his logbook. His family can survive on $90k/year so he works for 3 months takes 9 months off every year. eg8r</div></div>Bloody hell, what sort of logs are they.
mac.

Soflasnapper
06-15-2012, 08:30 AM
N. Dakota has two major advantages. All that oil and/or natural gas, AND their own state-owned bank. This last is quite important and overlooked.

eg8r
06-15-2012, 10:04 AM
LOL, I think you might be confused. In the states there are laws/requirements that state if you are driving an 18 wheeler you must keep track of the time you start and stop the truck. You have to track the miles you have driven also. So many truck drivers will run two different "log" books which basically have made up info so that when they stop at a weigh station (literally these stations weigh the truck to make sure they are not over a specific weight limit) if they ask to see your log book they will have a "story" that keeps them legal. The other option is that they can get off the major highways and take more rural routes to avoid the weigh station. The problem with this is that plenty of times they have Dept of Transportation waiting around on these types of roads and stop every single truck that goes by (if they are not already busy with one) and they check all kinds of stuff at that point.

Work in North Dakota is extremely lucrative even for those following the law. For the people willing to risk it, the money goes up quickly. Consider a guy willing to run (drive) 20 hrs/day can double or even triple what the normal guy is doing by legally only driving 10 hours/day.

eg8r

nAz
06-15-2012, 10:07 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">N. Dakota has two major advantages. All that oil and/or natural gas, AND their own state-owned bank. This last is quite important and overlooked.</div></div>

Hey now isn't N. Dakota a Red state? no way they would have a socialist form of banking... no way!

Gayle in MD
06-15-2012, 10:09 AM
And of course, anything if it's for money, then it's fine with you?

Everytime I see a massive pile up, there is some trucker involved who was too tired to be at the wheel!

Wonder how you'd feel about this completely illegal bahavior, if your family was one of the famlies to be struck, and killed by one of those same truckers, who falsified their log book?

G.

Sev
06-15-2012, 03:50 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">N. Dakota has two major advantages. All that oil and/or natural gas, AND their own state-owned bank. This last is quite important and overlooked. </div></div>

Awwwwww. They have an advantage.
Private entrepenaurs are taking advantage of the resouces and creating an economic boom.
Seems the wealth from it is trickling down locally at the state level hmmmmmmmmm?

Soflasnapper
06-15-2012, 06:18 PM
The state keeps a 50% interest in all the mineral rights to lands they sell or lease, and get a large payment from asserting their ownership rights over the oil and natural gas, coal, and etc., that is sold.

Trickle down? No, like Alaska, the state diverts that large income stream to themselves. It used to be the counties kept some of that money, but more recently, the state took that away, and gives them about 10% of the income stream on average.

Sev
06-15-2012, 08:31 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The state keeps a 50% interest in all the mineral rights to lands they sell or lease, and get a large payment from asserting their ownership rights over the oil and natural gas, coal, and etc., that is sold.

Trickle down? No, like Alaska, the state diverts that large income stream to themselves. It used to be the counties kept some of that money, but more recently, the state took that away, and gives them about 10% of the income stream on average. </div></div>

I'm talking private industry not state.
So all the people that are being employed at an average salary of 78,000.00 are not seeing a trickle down benefit from the oil boom?
None what so ever?

Soflasnapper
06-16-2012, 10:02 AM
Extra money without any extra goods or services creates the classic form of inflation-- more money chasing the same amount of goods increases those prices by supply and demand.

And that is a significant part of the outcome for the majority who do not receive these large salaries.

Housing and therefore real estate tax valuations are skyrocketing in price, pricing out those who are not employed in the oil bidness. It's far from all good.

In fact, it's both a blessing and a curse.

N. Dakota's oil boom is a blessing and a curse. (http://www.governing.com/topics/energy-env/north-dakotas-oil-boom-blessing-curse.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Yet many here echo the opinions of Kalil, who laments some of the challenges that Big Oil has imposed on the rural community. For starters, the region is a case study in an inflationary economy. As residents’ earnings soar, so too do the costs of goods and services. “Anything you can think of that a person would consume is also being consumed by folks in the oil industry,” says Dennis Lindahl, a city councilman in Stanley. “Merchants are able to charge an increased rate. Folks in town sometimes get a little upset from supporting the industry while not receiving benefits.”

The biggest struggle in the region, though, is the shortage of housing. When people in other parts of the country talk about a “housing shortage,” they don’t mean it literally. There are usually still plenty of available places for residents making decent money. But when people in western North Dakota discuss the housing shortage, they’re serious. There’s literally no place to sleep.

In the 1,200-person town of Tioga, Mayor Nathan Germundson recounts just how bad the situation is. He says one resident is actually sleeping in a church. The local radio station recently closed up shop and turned the property into a more lucrative business: an RV park. One group of truckers was sleeping in their vehicles and showering in the bathroom of a city park. When city officials put a lock on the door, it was broken off. For the lucky few who can get lodging here, the rents parallel those in major cities, easily topping $1,200 per month for a new two-bedroom unit. “As far as the city of Tioga goes, there hasn’t been a very good open line of communication between the industry,” Germundson says. “They just bring [workers] in. From what I gather, they don’t really care where they live or stay. They just care that they show up to work. They’re not really working with us to try to provide homes.”

Meanwhile in Minot, about 80 miles east of Tioga, the homeless population is increasing, and some housing developments have withdrawn from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income programs in order to charge higher rents, says Minot Finance Director Cindy Hemphill.

Ron Ness, who leads the association representing oil and gas companies operating here, says the industry endeavors to find housing for its workers, and the proliferation of problematic housing situations may be due to workers who arrived here without steady work. He says the industry has a great relationship with local officials. “I think we’re seen as part of a solution.”

The housing crunch has left local communities facing a dilemma. Build too little, and they’ll wind up with a city overrun by RV parks and unsafe living conditions. Build too much, and they could repeat the disastrous situation that arose in the 1980s when the last boom went bust. Back then, many cities were happy to help developers fill the housing void by building infrastructure for new homes in the hopes that the units would not only accommodate their new residents, but also generate property tax revenue. Then, almost overnight, oil prices fell. The industry pulled out, and the developers left town since they owed more in property taxes on undeveloped land than the value of the land itself. In Williston, the city took ownership of those developments -- it eventually owned a quarter of the town -- and was stuck with more than $25 million in debt on the infrastructure without a tax base to pay it off.

This time, Williston and other cities have vowed to avoid repeating that mistake, taking a more measured approach to housing and requiring larger guarantees from developers. They’re also approaching the situation cautiously because they know the population will begin to decline dramatically sometime in the next 10 to 20 years, as the drilling phase of the boom is replaced by a slower phase in which oil steadily pumps from the ground without the need of much manpower. Drilling a new well creates about 120 jobs, but keeping it running only requires a single person. “You don’t build for 100 percent [of the growth]; you build for 20 percent,” says Gene Veeder, who leads economic development in McKenzie County, which has more active drilling rigs than anywhere else in the state. But, he concedes, it’s not an exact science. “My guess is no better or worse than anyone else’s.” </div></div>

Gayle in MD
06-17-2012, 08:07 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Extra money without any extra goods or services creates the classic form of inflation-- more money chasing the same amount of goods increases those prices by supply and demand.

And that is a significant part of the outcome for the majority who do not receive these large salaries.

Housing and therefore real estate tax valuations are skyrocketing in price, pricing out those who are not employed in the oil bidness. It's far from all good.

In fact, it's both a blessing and a curse.

N. Dakota's oil boom is a blessing and a curse. (http://www.governing.com/topics/energy-env/north-dakotas-oil-boom-blessing-curse.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Yet many here echo the opinions of Kalil, who laments some of the challenges that Big Oil has imposed on the rural community. For starters, the region is a case study in an inflationary economy. As residents’ earnings soar, so too do the costs of goods and services. “Anything you can think of that a person would consume is also being consumed by folks in the oil industry,” says Dennis Lindahl, a city councilman in Stanley. “Merchants are able to charge an increased rate. Folks in town sometimes get a little upset from supporting the industry while not receiving benefits.”

The biggest struggle in the region, though, is the shortage of housing. When people in other parts of the country talk about a “housing shortage,” they don’t mean it literally. There are usually still plenty of available places for residents making decent money. But when people in western North Dakota discuss the housing shortage, they’re serious. There’s literally no place to sleep.

In the 1,200-person town of Tioga, Mayor Nathan Germundson recounts just how bad the situation is. He says one resident is actually sleeping in a church. The local radio station recently closed up shop and turned the property into a more lucrative business: an RV park. One group of truckers was sleeping in their vehicles and showering in the bathroom of a city park. When city officials put a lock on the door, it was broken off. For the lucky few who can get lodging here, the rents parallel those in major cities, easily topping $1,200 per month for a new two-bedroom unit. “As far as the city of Tioga goes, there hasn’t been a very good open line of communication between the industry,” Germundson says. “They just bring [workers] in. From what I gather, they don’t really care where they live or stay. They just care that they show up to work. They’re not really working with us to try to provide homes.”

Meanwhile in Minot, about 80 miles east of Tioga, the homeless population is increasing, and some housing developments have withdrawn from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income programs in order to charge higher rents, says Minot Finance Director Cindy Hemphill.

Ron Ness, who leads the association representing oil and gas companies operating here, says the industry endeavors to find housing for its workers, and the proliferation of problematic housing situations may be due to workers who arrived here without steady work. He says the industry has a great relationship with local officials. “I think we’re seen as part of a solution.”

The housing crunch has left local communities facing a dilemma. Build too little, and they’ll wind up with a city overrun by RV parks and unsafe living conditions. Build too much, and they could repeat the disastrous situation that arose in the 1980s when the last boom went bust. Back then, many cities were happy to help developers fill the housing void by building infrastructure for new homes in the hopes that the units would not only accommodate their new residents, but also generate property tax revenue. Then, almost overnight, oil prices fell. The industry pulled out, and the developers left town since they owed more in property taxes on undeveloped land than the value of the land itself. In Williston, the city took ownership of those developments -- it eventually owned a quarter of the town -- and was stuck with more than $25 million in debt on the infrastructure without a tax base to pay it off.

This time, Williston and other cities have vowed to avoid repeating that mistake, taking a more measured approach to housing and requiring larger guarantees from developers. They’re also approaching the situation cautiously because they know the population will begin to decline dramatically sometime in the next 10 to 20 years, as the drilling phase of the boom is replaced by a slower phase in which oil steadily pumps from the ground without the need of much manpower. Drilling a new well creates about 120 jobs, but keeping it running only requires a single person. “You don’t build for 100 percent [of the growth]; you build for 20 percent,” says Gene Veeder, who leads economic development in McKenzie County, which has more active drilling rigs than anywhere else in the state. But, he concedes, it’s not an exact science. “My guess is no better or worse than anyone else’s.” </div></div> </div></div>

The degree of damage and suffering, all told, from the oil and coal, Fracking and Drilling away our clean air and water, contaminating our weloll water, making us sick, and then tryng to rave the way for corruption in the Big Pharma, Medical and insturance industries, is beyond any reasonable contemplation!

Just tryng to get the facts of their destruction out in front of the people, is nearly impossible, given who owns the media in this country.

Then we have to listen to idiots yapping about keeping government out of the business and idustry in this country!

What is it going to take to make Repiglicans give a damned about the healooth of their kids and grand kids! The sustenence of our ploanet, animals, oceans?

Beyond ignorance, bordering on insanity!

G.

Sev
06-20-2012, 07:51 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Extra money without any extra goods or services creates the classic form of inflation-- more money chasing the same amount of goods increases those prices by supply and demand.

And that is a significant part of the outcome for the majority who do not receive these large salaries.

Housing and therefore real estate tax valuations are skyrocketing in price, pricing out those who are not employed in the oil bidness. It's far from all good.

In fact, it's both a blessing and a curse.

N. Dakota's oil boom is a blessing and a curse. (http://www.governing.com/topics/energy-env/north-dakotas-oil-boom-blessing-curse.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Yet many here echo the opinions of Kalil, who laments some of the challenges that Big Oil has imposed on the rural community. For starters, the region is a case study in an inflationary economy. As residents’ earnings soar, so too do the costs of goods and services. “Anything you can think of that a person would consume is also being consumed by folks in the oil industry,” says Dennis Lindahl, a city councilman in Stanley. “Merchants are able to charge an increased rate. Folks in town sometimes get a little upset from supporting the industry while not receiving benefits.”

The biggest struggle in the region, though, is the shortage of housing. When people in other parts of the country talk about a “housing shortage,” they don’t mean it literally. There are usually still plenty of available places for residents making decent money. But when people in western North Dakota discuss the housing shortage, they’re serious. There’s literally no place to sleep.

In the 1,200-person town of Tioga, Mayor Nathan Germundson recounts just how bad the situation is. He says one resident is actually sleeping in a church. The local radio station recently closed up shop and turned the property into a more lucrative business: an RV park. One group of truckers was sleeping in their vehicles and showering in the bathroom of a city park. When city officials put a lock on the door, it was broken off. For the lucky few who can get lodging here, the rents parallel those in major cities, easily topping $1,200 per month for a new two-bedroom unit. “As far as the city of Tioga goes, there hasn’t been a very good open line of communication between the industry,” Germundson says. “They just bring [workers] in. From what I gather, they don’t really care where they live or stay. They just care that they show up to work. They’re not really working with us to try to provide homes.”

Meanwhile in Minot, about 80 miles east of Tioga, the homeless population is increasing, and some housing developments have withdrawn from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income programs in order to charge higher rents, says Minot Finance Director Cindy Hemphill.

Ron Ness, who leads the association representing oil and gas companies operating here, says the industry endeavors to find housing for its workers, and the proliferation of problematic housing situations may be due to workers who arrived here without steady work. He says the industry has a great relationship with local officials. “I think we’re seen as part of a solution.”

The housing crunch has left local communities facing a dilemma. Build too little, and they’ll wind up with a city overrun by RV parks and unsafe living conditions. Build too much, and they could repeat the disastrous situation that arose in the 1980s when the last boom went bust. Back then, many cities were happy to help developers fill the housing void by building infrastructure for new homes in the hopes that the units would not only accommodate their new residents, but also generate property tax revenue. Then, almost overnight, oil prices fell. The industry pulled out, and the developers left town since they owed more in property taxes on undeveloped land than the value of the land itself. In Williston, the city took ownership of those developments -- it eventually owned a quarter of the town -- and was stuck with more than $25 million in debt on the infrastructure without a tax base to pay it off.

This time, Williston and other cities have vowed to avoid repeating that mistake, taking a more measured approach to housing and requiring larger guarantees from developers. They’re also approaching the situation cautiously because they know the population will begin to decline dramatically sometime in the next 10 to 20 years, as the drilling phase of the boom is replaced by a slower phase in which oil steadily pumps from the ground without the need of much manpower. Drilling a new well creates about 120 jobs, but keeping it running only requires a single person. “You don’t build for 100 percent [of the growth]; you build for 20 percent,” says Gene Veeder, who leads economic development in McKenzie County, which has more active drilling rigs than anywhere else in the state. But, he concedes, it’s not an exact science. “My guess is no better or worse than anyone else’s.” </div></div> </div></div>

Lifes not fair. Nor should it be.

Sev
06-20-2012, 07:53 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Extra money without any extra goods or services creates the classic form of inflation-- more money chasing the same amount of goods increases those prices by supply and demand.

And that is a significant part of the outcome for the majority who do not receive these large salaries.

Housing and therefore real estate tax valuations are skyrocketing in price, pricing out those who are not employed in the oil bidness. It's far from all good.

In fact, it's both a blessing and a curse.

N. Dakota's oil boom is a blessing and a curse. (http://www.governing.com/topics/energy-env/north-dakotas-oil-boom-blessing-curse.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Yet many here echo the opinions of Kalil, who laments some of the challenges that Big Oil has imposed on the rural community. For starters, the region is a case study in an inflationary economy. As residents’ earnings soar, so too do the costs of goods and services. “Anything you can think of that a person would consume is also being consumed by folks in the oil industry,” says Dennis Lindahl, a city councilman in Stanley. “Merchants are able to charge an increased rate. Folks in town sometimes get a little upset from supporting the industry while not receiving benefits.”

The biggest struggle in the region, though, is the shortage of housing. When people in other parts of the country talk about a “housing shortage,” they don’t mean it literally. There are usually still plenty of available places for residents making decent money. But when people in western North Dakota discuss the housing shortage, they’re serious. There’s literally no place to sleep.

In the 1,200-person town of Tioga, Mayor Nathan Germundson recounts just how bad the situation is. He says one resident is actually sleeping in a church. The local radio station recently closed up shop and turned the property into a more lucrative business: an RV park. One group of truckers was sleeping in their vehicles and showering in the bathroom of a city park. When city officials put a lock on the door, it was broken off. For the lucky few who can get lodging here, the rents parallel those in major cities, easily topping $1,200 per month for a new two-bedroom unit. “As far as the city of Tioga goes, there hasn’t been a very good open line of communication between the industry,” Germundson says. “They just bring [workers] in. From what I gather, they don’t really care where they live or stay. They just care that they show up to work. They’re not really working with us to try to provide homes.”

Meanwhile in Minot, about 80 miles east of Tioga, the homeless population is increasing, and some housing developments have withdrawn from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income programs in order to charge higher rents, says Minot Finance Director Cindy Hemphill.

Ron Ness, who leads the association representing oil and gas companies operating here, says the industry endeavors to find housing for its workers, and the proliferation of problematic housing situations may be due to workers who arrived here without steady work. He says the industry has a great relationship with local officials. “I think we’re seen as part of a solution.”

The housing crunch has left local communities facing a dilemma. Build too little, and they’ll wind up with a city overrun by RV parks and unsafe living conditions. Build too much, and they could repeat the disastrous situation that arose in the 1980s when the last boom went bust. Back then, many cities were happy to help developers fill the housing void by building infrastructure for new homes in the hopes that the units would not only accommodate their new residents, but also generate property tax revenue. Then, almost overnight, oil prices fell. The industry pulled out, and the developers left town since they owed more in property taxes on undeveloped land than the value of the land itself. In Williston, the city took ownership of those developments -- it eventually owned a quarter of the town -- and was stuck with more than $25 million in debt on the infrastructure without a tax base to pay it off.

This time, Williston and other cities have vowed to avoid repeating that mistake, taking a more measured approach to housing and requiring larger guarantees from developers. They’re also approaching the situation cautiously because they know the population will begin to decline dramatically sometime in the next 10 to 20 years, as the drilling phase of the boom is replaced by a slower phase in which oil steadily pumps from the ground without the need of much manpower. Drilling a new well creates about 120 jobs, but keeping it running only requires a single person. “You don’t build for 100 percent [of the growth]; you build for 20 percent,” says Gene Veeder, who leads economic development in McKenzie County, which has more active drilling rigs than anywhere else in the state. But, he concedes, it’s not an exact science. “My guess is no better or worse than anyone else’s.” </div></div> </div></div>

The degree of damage and suffering, all told, from the oil and coal, Fracking and Drilling away our clean air and water, contaminating our weloll water, making us sick, and then tryng to rave the way for corruption in the Big Pharma, Medical and insturance industries, is beyond any reasonable contemplation!

Just tryng to get the facts of their destruction out in front of the people, is nearly impossible, given who owns the media in this country.

Then we have to listen to idiots yapping about keeping government out of the business and idustry in this country!

What is it going to take to make Repiglicans give a damned about the healooth of their kids and grand kids! The sustenence of our ploanet, animals, oceans?

Beyond ignorance, bordering on insanity!

G. </div></div>

Reduce the population of the planet to below 500,000,000 and it wont be a problem.

Soflasnapper
06-21-2012, 08:50 AM
There's a plan to do that, I've heard.

That plan is as much of a problem as this other, however.

"Back to zero, that's where we're going!" -- Jagger/Richard

Gayle in MD
06-21-2012, 10:20 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Gayle in MD</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Extra money without any extra goods or services creates the classic form of inflation-- more money chasing the same amount of goods increases those prices by supply and demand.

And that is a significant part of the outcome for the majority who do not receive these large salaries.

Housing and therefore real estate tax valuations are skyrocketing in price, pricing out those who are not employed in the oil bidness. It's far from all good.

In fact, it's both a blessing and a curse.

N. Dakota's oil boom is a blessing and a curse. (http://www.governing.com/topics/energy-env/north-dakotas-oil-boom-blessing-curse.html)

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Yet many here echo the opinions of Kalil, who laments some of the challenges that Big Oil has imposed on the rural community. For starters, the region is a case study in an inflationary economy. As residents’ earnings soar, so too do the costs of goods and services. “Anything you can think of that a person would consume is also being consumed by folks in the oil industry,” says Dennis Lindahl, a city councilman in Stanley. “Merchants are able to charge an increased rate. Folks in town sometimes get a little upset from supporting the industry while not receiving benefits.”

The biggest struggle in the region, though, is the shortage of housing. When people in other parts of the country talk about a “housing shortage,” they don’t mean it literally. There are usually still plenty of available places for residents making decent money. But when people in western North Dakota discuss the housing shortage, they’re serious. There’s literally no place to sleep.

In the 1,200-person town of Tioga, Mayor Nathan Germundson recounts just how bad the situation is. He says one resident is actually sleeping in a church. The local radio station recently closed up shop and turned the property into a more lucrative business: an RV park. One group of truckers was sleeping in their vehicles and showering in the bathroom of a city park. When city officials put a lock on the door, it was broken off. For the lucky few who can get lodging here, the rents parallel those in major cities, easily topping $1,200 per month for a new two-bedroom unit. “As far as the city of Tioga goes, there hasn’t been a very good open line of communication between the industry,” Germundson says. “They just bring [workers] in. From what I gather, they don’t really care where they live or stay. They just care that they show up to work. They’re not really working with us to try to provide homes.”

Meanwhile in Minot, about 80 miles east of Tioga, the homeless population is increasing, and some housing developments have withdrawn from U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income programs in order to charge higher rents, says Minot Finance Director Cindy Hemphill.

Ron Ness, who leads the association representing oil and gas companies operating here, says the industry endeavors to find housing for its workers, and the proliferation of problematic housing situations may be due to workers who arrived here without steady work. He says the industry has a great relationship with local officials. “I think we’re seen as part of a solution.”

The housing crunch has left local communities facing a dilemma. Build too little, and they’ll wind up with a city overrun by RV parks and unsafe living conditions. Build too much, and they could repeat the disastrous situation that arose in the 1980s when the last boom went bust. Back then, many cities were happy to help developers fill the housing void by building infrastructure for new homes in the hopes that the units would not only accommodate their new residents, but also generate property tax revenue. Then, almost overnight, oil prices fell. The industry pulled out, and the developers left town since they owed more in property taxes on undeveloped land than the value of the land itself. In Williston, the city took ownership of those developments -- it eventually owned a quarter of the town -- and was stuck with more than $25 million in debt on the infrastructure without a tax base to pay it off.

This time, Williston and other cities have vowed to avoid repeating that mistake, taking a more measured approach to housing and requiring larger guarantees from developers. They’re also approaching the situation cautiously because they know the population will begin to decline dramatically sometime in the next 10 to 20 years, as the drilling phase of the boom is replaced by a slower phase in which oil steadily pumps from the ground without the need of much manpower. Drilling a new well creates about 120 jobs, but keeping it running only requires a single person. “You don’t build for 100 percent [of the growth]; you build for 20 percent,” says Gene Veeder, who leads economic development in McKenzie County, which has more active drilling rigs than anywhere else in the state. But, he concedes, it’s not an exact science. “My guess is no better or worse than anyone else’s.” </div></div> </div></div>

The degree of damage and suffering, all told, from the oil and coal, Fracking and Drilling away our clean air and water, contaminating our weloll water, making us sick, and then tryng to rave the way for corruption in the Big Pharma, Medical and insturance industries, is beyond any reasonable contemplation!

Just tryng to get the facts of their destruction out in front of the people, is nearly impossible, given who owns the media in this country.

Then we have to listen to idiots yapping about keeping government out of the business and idustry in this country!

What is it going to take to make Repiglicans give a damned about the healooth of their kids and grand kids! The sustenence of our ploanet, animals, oceans?

Beyond ignorance, bordering on insanity!

G. </div></div>

Reduce the population of the planet to below 500,000,000 and it wont be a problem. </div></div>

LMAO! Not a chance, with Repigs and the anachronistic, ignorance of the radical religious right, trying to outlaw birth control AND abortion.

/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

DiabloViejo
06-21-2012, 10:49 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

Reduce the population of the planet to below 500,000,000 and it wont be a problem. </div></div>

So you support the mass murder of 5.5 BILLION human beings in order to get to your population target? Nice! Who gets to decide who lives and who dies? When it comes to genocide, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot would be rank amateurs compared to you, huh? A Jew advocating for genocide..who would have thought it?

How do you reconcile your support against the oft stated right wing pro-life stand? Or is that just more BS?

Remember this? That was only 6 Million! You are promoting a new genocide at a nearly one thousand fold increase from Hitler's exterminations. Way to go Sev!

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Ohrdruf/Ohrdruf02.jpg

Soflasnapper
06-21-2012, 11:47 AM
Simple answer. This time, no Jews among the victims.

Not that it would work out that way, of course.

When other animals become more numerous than their habitat can support, they either migrate, and/or die off in huge numbers from starvation, malnutrition-aided disease and weakness, or a vast increase in predators (who then have their own boom and bust cycle, just later).

We seem well on our way to the work of the Four Horsemen, but some of the disease, pestilence, famine and naturally war, will be from human causation. If they ever perfect the genome-specific biowarfare agents they are working on, game over.

But the multi-millions at risk for starvation from weather disasters will be increasingly dead regardless of all of that.

Sev
06-23-2012, 06:44 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: DiabloViejo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Sev</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

Reduce the population of the planet to below 500,000,000 and it wont be a problem. </div></div>

So you support the mass murder of 5.5 BILLION human beings in order to get to your population target? Nice! Who gets to decide who lives and who dies? When it comes to genocide, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot would be rank amateurs compared to you, huh? A Jew advocating for genocide..who would have thought it?

How do you reconcile your support against the oft stated right wing pro-life stand? Or is that just more BS?

Remember this? That was only 6 Million! You are promoting a new genocide at a nearly one thousand fold increase from Hitler's exterminations. Way to go Sev!

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Ohrdruf/Ohrdruf02.jpg

</div></div>

Your intellectual capacity seems to be diminishing Fats.
Point out where I said anybody had to be killed to reduce the population of the planet.

Sev
06-23-2012, 06:47 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Simple answer. This time, no Jews among the victims.

Not that it would work out that way, of course.

When other animals become more numerous than their habitat can support, they either migrate, and/or die off in huge numbers from starvation, malnutrition-aided disease and weakness, or a vast increase in predators (who then have their own boom and bust cycle, just later).

We seem well on our way to the work of the Four Horsemen, but some of the disease, pestilence, famine and naturally war, will be from human causation. If they ever perfect the genome-specific biowarfare agents they are working on, game over.

But the multi-millions at risk for starvation from weather disasters will be increasingly dead regardless of all of that.

</div></div>

Its called a population crash.
However we stand a better chance of being taken out in the near term by a previously curable disease that has now grown resistant to antibiotics.

Soflasnapper
06-24-2012, 11:20 AM
Which could be the result of military bio-engineering, of course.

I recall how a submarine commander must on occasion seal off the bulkhead, dooming those trapped there to death by drowning, in order to save the vessel and the rest of the seamen.

The military prides themselves on such decision making, and I could see them taking such a 'tough love' tactic as arranging the beginning of a pandemic for various military and political reasons.

Gayle in MD
06-24-2012, 11:25 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I recall how a submarine commander must on occasion seal off the bulkhead, dooming those trapped there to death by drowning, in order to save the vessel and the rest of the seamen.

</div></div>

Wow! That's the best description of Repiglican economics I've ever read!

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Soflasnapper
06-24-2012, 01:14 PM
It's all done for our own good. Or something. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

Sev
06-24-2012, 02:04 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Which could be the result of military bio-engineering, of course.

I recall how a submarine commander must on occasion seal off the bulkhead, dooming those trapped there to death by drowning, in order to save the vessel and the rest of the seamen.

The military prides themselves on such decision making, and I could see them taking such a 'tough love' tactic as arranging the beginning of a pandemic for various military and political reasons. </div></div>

Unfortunately the bioengineering this time is being done by the abuse of antibiotics.

I saw a report where a strain of the clap is now virtually incurable due to resistance to drugs. There is an entire list of diseases that are going in this direction.
Add to that the weakening of the human immune system do to the lack of nutrition in out modified foods and you have a recipe for disaster.

Extinction events have occurred through a simple mutation without the manipulation of man.

Sev
06-24-2012, 02:05 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Soflasnapper</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It's all done for our own good. Or something. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif </div></div>

Thats what the leftist tell us.