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Fred Agnir
10-04-2002, 07:19 AM
One of my new teammates has reminded me of the importance of watching better players and learning from it. The question is, "what should they be lookiing for?"

I think that it's different for every player, and that it's up to the player to figure out what information they can use to benefit their own game.

When I was a beginner, I would watch the better player's stroke, address, follow through, and overall cadence. The physical motion (or lack of motions as it were)that separates a consistent shotmaker from an inconsistent one.

As I advanced, I watched the bridge hand and the grip hand intently. Some people have no idea that there are some dozen or more bridges that really need to be worked on to continue up the ladder. I watched the footwork, the bridge lengths, the approach to the table, how they leaned over.

Further observation was on the pattern and position play. The strategy and the thought process. How they walk around the table. How they check the angles.

All that said, I personally think that a beginner shouldn't try to engulf him/herself in all the observations, but choose one aspect (the first above) and work on that. Continue from there.

How this reminder came up was when one of my new teammates informed us that he would only show up to league night if he was going to play. I requested that he show up, at least for nothing else but to watch. He didn't get it.

Fred <~~~ still watching

10-04-2002, 07:25 AM
I like to watch pool on ESPN, Survivor and Big Brother 3. Oh, and Teen Girls Gone Wild..... Tampa Tubby-Bob

eg8r
10-04-2002, 07:31 AM
I like watching Accustats. I have never really paid much attention to the way a player will address the ball or his stance or how held the cue (unless the commentator says something about it). Half the time when the player is looking at angles I don't understand why they are looking where they are looking. What I spend the most of my time watching is what the cueball does after it hits the ob in order to get position. Obviously in 9ball I know what the next ball is going to be, so I pay attention to how the player gets there. Makes it easier the next time I am faced with the same position.

eg8r

Wally_in_Cincy
10-04-2002, 07:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> How this reminder came up was when one of my new teammates informed us that he would only show up to league night if he was going to play.
<hr></blockquote>
How hard was it to kick that guy off the team? /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

Seriously, when I first started I really got very little from watching because I didn't know what I was looking at or looking for. After about a year of play I began to understand what I was looking AT. Then I was able to improve by watching better players.

Fred Agnir
10-04-2002, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> How hard was it to kick that guy off the team? /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif<hr></blockquote>
In all seriousness, he's the best self-taught no-real-competition player I've had on any team. He's got all the physical tools. He needs seasoning and a lot of runout education (that would come with watching).

His biggest problem is the one that plagues most of us in the pool world: ego. He believes he's better than he is and isn't up to learning anything. Coming down from the mountain where he's top gun, he is blind to the fact that he's not in anyone's top 10 list in the valley. He joins about 20 other guys with the same delusion.

Fred

Rich R.
10-04-2002, 08:27 AM
Fred, I think this is the best advice you could give to any player of any skill level. If you watch, you can learn so much more about pool. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, well, watching a good player is worth more than that. I find that once many players attain a certain level of skill, they don't want to watch other players. They prefer to stand around and tell every one else how good they are. I must not have reached that level yet, and hope I don't, since I still enjoy watching good players and I continue to learn.
Rich R.

Tom_In_Cincy
10-04-2002, 08:42 AM
Fred,
Another good post on pool..

remember the term "hich-hiking"? almost everytime I see the Pros play, my game seems to step up a notch. I see the Pros warmming up and then I might learn a new practice drill.

When at the regular pool room..I also see jacked up strokes.. miss-cueing, poor pattern play, no strategy, total offensive mindsets, bad strokes, bad sportsmanship, cussing, endless excuses of poor conditions (tables, rails, cues, tips, cloth.. etc) and hardly anyone practicing.

10-04-2002, 09:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> One of my new teammates has reminded me of the importance of watching better players and learning from it. The question is, "what should they be lookiing for?"

I think that it's different for every player, and that it's up to the player to figure out what information they can use to benefit their own game.

When I was a beginner, I would watch the better player's stroke, address, follow through, and overall cadence. The physical motion (or lack of motions as it were)that separates a consistent shotmaker from an inconsistent one.

As I advanced, I watched the bridge hand and the grip hand intently. Some people have no idea that there are some dozen or more bridges that really need to be worked on to continue up the ladder. I watched the footwork, the bridge lengths, the approach to the table, how they leaned over.

Further observation was on the pattern and position play. The strategy and the thought process. How they walk around the table. How they check the angles.

All that said, I personally think that a beginner shouldn't try to engulf him/herself in all the observations, but choose one aspect (the first above) and work on that. Continue from there.

How this reminder came up was when one of my new teammates informed us that he would only show up to league night if he was going to play. I requested that he show up, at least for nothing else but to watch. He didn't get it.

Fred &lt;~~~ still watching <hr></blockquote>

Rare good post,not from you Fred but from the overall ccb coupled with intelligent replies

The observant and dedicated player along with a strong desire to excel at pool will find something of interest 'watching' any and all accomplished players.

Not meant to be a negative towards leagues but sometimes,imo,league play will not be your best source for viewing quality play.But with that said,if your team mate doesn't want to 'watch' a more accomplished player,he is a loser and will plateau out at some point and won't know what hit him,ego or not.

Good post,wild tattoo,and 'you have to learn how to lose before you learn how to win' BS