PDA

View Full Version : The Return of Dickensian Debtor Prisons



Qtec
07-09-2012, 04:05 AM
Land of the free.......YEE-HAAAH.......

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn't pay a medical bill -- one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn't owe. "She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn't have to pay it," The Associated Press reports. "But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs."

Although the U.S. abolished debtors' prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don't pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to credit card and auto loans. In parts of Illinois, debt collectors commonly use publicly funded courts, sheriff's deputies, and country jails to pressure people who owe even small amounts to pay up, according to the AP.

Under the law, debtors aren't arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing "contempt of court" in connection with a creditor lawsuit. That loophole has lawmakers in the Illinois House of Representatives concerned enough to pass a bill in March that would make it illegal to send residents of the state to jail if they can't pay a debt. The measure awaits action in the senate.

"Creditors have been manipulating the court system to extract money from the unemployed, veterans, even seniors who rely solely on their benefits to get by each month," Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said last month in a statement voicing support for the legislation. "Too many people have been thrown in jail simply because they're too poor to pay their debts. We cannot allow these illegal abuses to continue."

Of course, yet another way for private industry to squeeze a little more out of the already tapped out poor. Add a processing fee, a per-day holding fee, a collection surcharge and before you know it, these private prisons have nailed you for twice your original debt.

Hard to believe that this is the "land of the free", innit? </div></div>

This is what happens when you have prisons for profit.

Q... link (http://crooksandliars.com/nicole-belle/return-dickensian-debtor-prisons)

LWW
07-09-2012, 04:17 AM
It's a shame you didn't botherbtoread what you cut and pasted.

If you had, you woud realize she wasn't arrested for the debt ... she was arrested for ignoring a court order to appear when the creditor sed their legl rights to pursue collection of the debt.

Sev
07-09-2012, 06:02 AM
The FEMA camps are well underway though.

eg8r
07-09-2012, 07:18 AM
You can always look for qtip to rear his ugly head when a law is enforced.

eg8r

Gayle in MD
07-09-2012, 07:56 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Land of the free.......YEE-HAAAH.......

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn't pay a medical bill -- one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn't owe. "She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn't have to pay it," The Associated Press reports. "But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs."

Although the U.S. abolished debtors' prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don't pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to credit card and auto loans. In parts of Illinois, debt collectors commonly use publicly funded courts, sheriff's deputies, and country jails to pressure people who owe even small amounts to pay up, according to the AP.

Under the law, debtors aren't arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing "contempt of court" in connection with a creditor lawsuit. That loophole has lawmakers in the Illinois House of Representatives concerned enough to pass a bill in March that would make it illegal to send residents of the state to jail if they can't pay a debt. The measure awaits action in the senate.

"Creditors have been manipulating the court system to extract money from the unemployed, veterans, even seniors who rely solely on their benefits to get by each month," Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said last month in a statement voicing support for the legislation. "Too many people have been thrown in jail simply because they're too poor to pay their debts. We cannot allow these illegal abuses to continue."

Of course, yet another way for private industry to squeeze a little more out of the already tapped out poor. Add a processing fee, a per-day holding fee, a collection surcharge and before you know it, these private prisons have nailed you for twice your original debt.

Hard to believe that this is the "land of the free", innit? </div></div>

This is what happens when you have prisons for profit.

Q... link (http://crooksandliars.com/nicole-belle/return-dickensian-debtor-prisons)


</div></div>

Just one of a number of atrocities which are happening around the country, and linked to privatized prisons.

You would think that after watching the Cheney/Bush corporate collusion with their own, and their family's war profiteering, corporate thieves over for profit services in Iraq, with their Carlyle and Halliburton fellow pigs stealing from all of us through overcharges, (which were never addressed by Bush, or his blank check Repiglican congress) people would be up in arms over these kinds of atrocities and abuses.

In a country where a sitting judge is exposed and convicted for sending innocent adolescents to cells to benefit his own profits, from privatized institutions, the country would wake up!

But as usual, the right will have no outrage, as long as some crook is working the system, and getting away with it, they are blind to the horrendous practice.

All of this boils down to The Shock Doctrine, badger and degrade the common folks, until they are so hopeless, poor, sick and so degraded and attacked, that they feel helpless to turn it around.

That's going to change.

G.

Gayle in MD
07-09-2012, 08:09 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You can always look for qtip to rear his ugly head when a law is enforced.

eg8r </div></div>


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> "She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn't have to pay it," The Associated Press reports. "But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs."



That loophole has lawmakers in the Illinois House of Representatives concerned enough to pass a bill in March that would make it illegal to send residents of the state to jail if they can't pay a debt. The measure awaits action in the senate.
"Creditors have been manipulating the court system to extract money from the unemployed, veterans, even seniors who rely solely on their benefits to get by each month," Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said last month in a statement voicing support for the legislation. "Too many people have been thrown in jail simply because they're too poor to pay their debts. We cannot allow these illegal abuses to continue."
</div></div>


The woman was innocent. It's a scam. A loophole which even the Attorney General of that state is calling illegal.

Can you read?

G.

eg8r
07-09-2012, 10:06 AM
Did she have it in error stating she did not have to pay? The loophole is not illegal. According to the text you quoted the bill has not been passed. Maybe it is you who cannot read. When the woman was tossed in jail none of this was illegal.

Before you attack my reading skills you need to make sure you have bothered to read.

eg8r

Gayle in MD
07-09-2012, 10:32 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Did she have it in error stating she did not have to pay? The loophole is not illegal. According to the text you quoted the bill has not been passed. Maybe it is you who cannot read. When the woman was tossed in jail none of this was illegal.

Before you attack my reading skills you need to make sure you have bothered to read.

eg8r </div></div>


<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <span style="color: #990000"> <span style='font-size: 14pt'>"She got a $280 medical bill <span style='font-size: 20pt'>in error</span> and was told she didn't have to pay it," The Associated Press reports. "But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs."

</span> </span> </div></div>

<span style="color: #990000">Read it again.

G.</span> /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

eg8r
07-09-2012, 11:00 AM
Was that sent to her in writing? Read again.

eg8r

Gayle in MD
07-09-2012, 11:39 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Was that sent to her in writing? Read again.

eg8r </div></div>

You read again. She was the victim of a scam.

She didn't owe anything.

G.

Qtec
07-10-2012, 03:24 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It's a shame you didn't botherbtoread what you cut and pasted. </div></div>

Its a shame you didn't understand it. LOL

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">she wasn't arrested for the debt ... she was arrested for ignoring a court order to appear when the creditor sed their legl rights to pursue collection of the debt. </div></div>

No kidding!!!!!!!!

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Under the law, debtors aren't arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing "contempt of court" in connection with a creditor lawsuit. <span style='font-size: 23pt'>That loophole.. </span> </div></div>

<span style='font-size: 26pt'>Its a loophole.</span>
<u>Its a way to send debtors to prison</u> by manipulating the court system, which is totally against the spirit of the law and should be illegal.

Q

Qtec
07-10-2012, 03:29 AM
The law that applies here is this one.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">In 1833 the United States abolished federal imprisonment for unpaid debts, </div></div>

Q

eg8r
07-10-2012, 07:39 AM
Sounds federal not state. Again, per the quote she was not imprisoned for unpaid debts...<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Under the law, debtors aren't arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing "contempt of court" in connection with a creditor lawsuit.</div></div>

eg8r

LWW
07-10-2012, 07:50 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: eg8r</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Sounds federal not state. Again, per the quote she was not imprisoned for unpaid debts...<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Under the law, debtors aren't arrested for nonpayment, but rather for failing to respond to court hearings, pay legal fines, or otherwise showing "contempt of court" in connection with a creditor lawsuit.</div></div>

eg8r </div></div>

Why do you continue to hold the bar so high for him?