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View Full Version : Phenolic Tip on Jump Cue



ceebee
10-05-2002, 09:31 AM
I'm considering a hard tip for my Jump Cue & I've heard about the Phenolic Tips, but have no experience with that type of tip. Problems with mis-Cue.. problems with staying on? Problems...?

10-05-2002, 12:40 PM
If the tips are kept roughed up and chalked there is no problem. The plus side is so big it worth any little inconvenience. For a jump cue they are unequaled.

smfsrca
10-05-2002, 01:05 PM
The BCA rule concerning jump tips:
"The cue tip on any stick used to perform a legal jump shot must be composed of either a leather or synthetic leather material."
Stick with leather if you compete in tournaments. The phenolic tip is illegal.

10-05-2002, 01:56 PM
On what do you base your opinion. I purchased phenolic tips off ebay and The manufacture sent me a copy of the letter from the BCA. approving their tips for competition. I have one on my break cue and my jump cue. They are amazing.

smfsrca
10-05-2002, 02:51 PM
It is not an opinion, it is a fact. A quote straight out of the BCA rules.
See:http://www.bca-pool.com/play/
"The cue tip on any stick used to perform a legal jump shot must be composed of either a leather or synthetic leather material."
Obviously, the term "synthetic leather" may leave some room for interpretation.
If you play Texas Express rules then:
See:http://www.billiardsdepot.com/texexp/rules_general_tex.htm
"The tip must be leather or any product deemed suitable for play by the tournament director."
Here it is up to the tournament director.
In either case you are safe if your tip is leather.
If the BCA or anyone else chooses not to adhere to the rule then you can use it. It is up to the tournament director (TD). On the other hand, if the TD decides to enforce the rule you will be out of luck. This of course, will rarely happen in reality. So, most of the time, if you are aware of the rule it is simply a matter of concience or professionalism.

10-05-2002, 03:16 PM
The BCA makes the rules, The BCA in writing approves the tips. Whet part of this don't you understand. Maybe it is on a case by case basis and not all tips are approved. But if you choose to use something that is sub-par, when there is something out there better, that is up to you, . But don't pass on misinformation when you don't know what you are talking about. I suggest you contact the BCA.

TonyM
10-05-2002, 08:31 PM
In a way, I agree that the phenolic tips are not what I'd call "synthetic leather" (whatever the hell that is!), but you should be aware that the BCA has approved several phenolic tips for tournament use. This includes the bunjee tip. It IS legal.

So whatever you might think of the interpretation of the rules, the tips are o.k. by the BCA.

To the original poster, some people have had problems with them coming off. Get a competant cue mechanic to install it, it is not a do it yourself job (unless you have a lathe).

Tony

Tommy_Davidson
10-05-2002, 10:06 PM
> I use the black Future tip on my jump cue,and it is approved by the BCA as "synthetic leather". I'm not sure if these tips are even being made anymore,but for breaking and jumping,they RULE,but might not be as good as these new phenolic tips. Tommy D.

rackmup
10-05-2002, 10:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: smfsrca:</font><hr>...must be composed of either a leather or synthetic leather...<hr></blockquote>

The strictly phenolic tip, such as solid plastic, resin or any other material, void of any leather, would be illegal per the BCA.

Most rock-hard jump tips are a compilation of resin and shreaded leather, which ARE legal. The "Bunjee" tip is such an example. They can be purchased directly from Instroke.

Regards,

Ken

rackmup
10-05-2002, 10:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>Phenolic plastic is a hard, dense material made by applying heat and pressure to layers of paper or glass cloth impregnated with synthetic resin. These layers of laminations are usually of cellulose paper, cotton fabrics, synthetic yarn fabrics, glass fabrics or unwoven fabrics. When heat and pressure are applied to the layers, a chemical reaction (polymerization) transforms the layers into a high-pressure thermosetting industrial laminated plastic.<hr></blockquote>

FYI-True phenolic products are void of any leather. However, with that being said, simply add shredded leather to the mix and TA DA!...A legal jump tip per the BCA.

Regards,

Ken