PDA

View Full Version : This game takes lots of practice..



10-10-2002, 05:57 PM
for years I've been reading posts about how to "get good quick" or how to "get better" and it seems that people want the benefits of playing like a pro, but aren't willing to put in the time.

The pro's have been playing for many, many years.. some of them 40 or 50 years, since they were little kids perhaps. My philosophy is that if I play twice as much as they did now, I'll improve 50% faster than they did. It takes AT LEAST an hour a day of playing to maintain a "par" level in my opinion, and up to 3 hours a day to actually "gain" something.. depending on how you practice.

I think that for those who want to "get good quick" and be a pro before they can even sink 5 balls in a row should either get on a table and put in the time that the pro's did, or forget about it. There isn't a miracle cure, or 30 minute video that is going to help. Books help, videos are good to give you a reference point, but in the end, the player who practices is going to win easier than the person who doesn't.

Also, get ahold of all the tools.. bank shots, tiki shots, carom shots, combinations, safeties, break, and play more than just 9-ball or 8-ball.

Just an idea.

Chris Cass
10-10-2002, 06:27 PM
Hi Kid,

Haven't seen you around for awhile. Take it from me. A person that reads books, watches videos, takes instruction and then applies the knowledge in practice WILL cut yrs off their goal. It does help tremendously. Just as in any learning situation. One day it will all come togather. You'll then realize what it takes to make it to the level you desire. It might not be pro but a contender isn't bad either. JMHO

Regards,

C.C.~~likes the kid....

10-10-2002, 10:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris Cass:</font><hr> Hi Kid,

Haven't seen you around for awhile. Take it from me. A person that reads books, watches videos, takes instruction and then applies the knowledge in practice WILL cut yrs off their goal. It does help tremendously. Just as in any learning situation. One day it will all come togather. You'll then realize what it takes to make it to the level you desire. It might not be pro but a contender isn't bad either. JMHO

Regards,

C.C.~~likes the kid.... <hr></blockquote>

Whaddup, Chris!! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif How are you doing? I've been lurking around here for a while, but finally Tom (in cincy) helped me get the login to work.. I guess the date on my computer was 20 years ahead...

anyways, I read the books, watch videos, accu-stats tapes, etc, etc.. but I didn't start winning tournaments untill I put in the time and energy and dicipline, and I'm only at the beginning of my goal.

Definatly read books, all of them are good, but once you've aquired a good stroke and some knowledge about the game, I think sports psychology books are just as important as books on pool.. i'd say this game is more mental than physical, but without that stroke, you ain't goin nowhere!!

At least practice an hour a day. That'll put you in the above-average catagory almost every time. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

bluewolf
10-10-2002, 11:22 PM
Post deleted by bluewolf

10-10-2002, 11:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Seattle-kid:</font><hr> for years I've been reading posts about how to "get good quick" or how to "get better" and it seems that people want the benefits of playing like a pro, but aren't willing to put in the time.

The pro's have been playing for many, many years.. some of them 40 or 50 years, since they were little kids perhaps. <hr></blockquote>

kid, you've just about figured out the one real, pure, true secret of pool:

the more you play.........! the better you get.

all the real players i know shoot a lot. close to or even past what's required in a full time job. one neat thing about pool is that talent can be beaten by practice.

chew on that y'all.

dan

10-11-2002, 09:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: bluewolf:</font><hr> sk,

glad you got your login fixed. yeah me too.no quick fixes.i dont know if i practice twice as much i will get better twice as fast.i just know that nomatter how many books you read or classes you go too, nothing replaces time on the table. i used to be looking for a quick fix because i learned other sports so quick, then reality sunk in that if i am going to be good at pool, i will have to be patient, teachable and enthusiastic.i know some with more talent improve more quickly but determination,imo, goes a long way. at least i hope so. i have some talent but not as much as some people, but i do have loads of determination.

bw <hr></blockquote>

Whaddup, G? /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Yep.. I'm in the same boat... I have lots of determination, but this game, at it's highest level, is all about confidence. I don't have 100% confidence all the time.. but most of the time I do.. sometimes just not at the right time.

Anyways, I just see people on this board that talk crap, and bicker and babble.. but honestly.. I can only write a few messages on here before I decide I need to practice some more on my living room table. .. I don't know.. confidence can take you a very long ways in this game, even if you don't have great stroke, you can win with confidence sometimes. But confidence is easier achieved with practice. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

10-11-2002, 09:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: houstondan:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Seattle-kid:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; for years I've been reading posts about how to "get good quick" or how to "get better" and it seems that people want the benefits of playing like a pro, but aren't willing to put in the time.

The pro's have been playing for many, many years.. some of them 40 or 50 years, since they were little kids perhaps. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

kid, you've just about figured out the one real, pure, true secret of pool:

the more you play.........! the better you get.

all the real players i know shoot a lot. close to or even past what's required in a full time job. one neat thing about pool is that talent can be beaten by practice.

chew on that y'all.

dan <hr></blockquote>


Yep, I've gotten the best of alot of talented players with my strait stroke and good speed control. And when you get all the break-outs, all the easy shots, all the medium-difficult shots, and a few crazy shots.. you win alot of games. :&gt;

jbullerjr
10-13-2002, 02:04 AM
Heard this quote once "the difference between a pro and an amatuer...An amatuer will practice a shot until he CAN make it, a Pro will practice a shot untill he CAN'T miss it."

J

10-13-2002, 05:39 AM
There's much more to it than how much you play. It always sounds good when you say that it takes "hard work" to make it to the top in any given activity, but with billiards I'm afraid to say that the single most important part of getting good is being naturally talented at the game. Don't get me wrong, I've watched people at the pool hall improve leaps and bounds over the course of the last few years, but they are still light-years away from beating some of kids who are just really gifted at shot-making and cue ball movement. Most aspects of the game can be taught, but the best players can figure out where the cue ball needs to go, how to get it there, and to not miss the shot. Also, there's a certain point where people tend to plateau. It's usually the point where you know exactly every shot in order to get out of the rack, but just miss something stupid every once in a while. The most talented players can focus enough to just simply not miss anything that they shouldn't. This game takes a combination of experience and talent that separates the good from the really good. Consistency is really the last skill to master that is by far the hardest.

10-13-2002, 07:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: jbullerjr:</font><hr> Heard this quote once "the difference between a pro and an amatuer...An amatuer will practice a shot until he CAN make it, a Pro will practice a shot untill he CAN'T miss it."

J <hr></blockquote>


Wow, I like that quote. Thank you for that.

10-13-2002, 08:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: yougottheseven:</font><hr> There's much more to it than how much you play. It always sounds good when you say that it takes "hard work" to make it to the top in any given activity, but with billiards I'm afraid to say that the single most important part of getting good is being naturally talented at the game. Don't get me wrong, I've watched people at the pool hall improve leaps and bounds over the course of the last few years, but they are still light-years away from beating some of kids who are just really gifted at shot-making and cue ball movement. Most aspects of the game can be taught, but the best players can figure out where the cue ball needs to go, how to get it there, and to not miss the shot. Also, there's a certain point where people tend to plateau. It's usually the point where you know exactly every shot in order to get out of the rack, but just miss something stupid every once in a while. The most talented players can focus enough to just simply not miss anything that they shouldn't. This game takes a combination of experience and talent that separates the good from the really good. Consistency is really the last skill to master that is by far the hardest. <hr></blockquote>


My idea about that, is that the kids that are "naturally gifted" are really just kids that live around and get taught by some of the best players.. and kids I think learn faster (can't teach an old dog new tricks?), and are also fearless. Thats pretty dangerous combination for pool IMO. I think anyone who wants to get good should first and foremost seek out someone who is adept at the game, or a local champion, and coerce them into either playing for some money, or trading cash for actual lessons. (but not till you get the basics down good.)

Playing great players will inevitably remind you not to miss easy shots, and when you see someone run 2 or 3 racks on you, you see what is possible, and add it to your expectations of yourself, as well as give yourself a goal to reach.

I seek out the best players I can find and play them for money, mostly because thats the only way to insure I get their best game, and doing that (playing great players) gives you more of a reason to think about what you are doing BEFORE You do it, instead of afterwards like it seems most people do, and therefore you do alot better.. IMO, although there could be factual information there also, I don't know.

anyways, with enough practice, and mastery of all the tools of pool.. draw, follow, breakouts, soft shots, hard shots, etc, etc.. I think once you start to play better players, your game will rise easier, than if you aren't practicing but once a week or so.

10-13-2002, 08:22 AM
You are on the right track, the more you put in, the more you will get out. Talent is not the most important thing, desire is more important. Many players that may look to be talented, may also lack the other traits required to be successful. Most of the pros play the way they do because of opportunity more then natural talent. You will find they had a pool table when young or worked in a pool room or the family had a pool room. Many pros have kids that become good players. It is more the opportunity to learn the game right and practice, then it is talent. Nobody says it is easy, but it is possible for most players to become very, very, good players if they really are willing to do what it takes.

10-13-2002, 08:31 AM
I don't know your age, but you have figured out what most never learn. It applies to anything in life and not just pool. Most look at successful people wish, instead of forming a plan of action. I would say good luck but you don't need, you have already found a better way. Always listen to all, but in the end trust yourself.

griffith_d
10-13-2002, 08:58 AM
Obviously, practicing and playing(tournaments/leagues) are almost opposite at times. "Practice makes perfect", does not always apply to competition. It is the competition that brings out the true player, the stress, the hooks by the other player,...and another item that no practice can always cover,....the ability to take advantage of the other players weakness, through playing them or watching.

If a player cannot capitalize on the other person's mistakes when the time comes,...they may never become the player that they should.

Griff

#### leonard
10-15-2002, 07:14 AM
I want to add that you can get better by what you do when your not playing pool. Just before going to sleep, play pool in your mind if you notice you never miss in this state. Your body is engineered to perform but minds step in and upset the cart. Learn self hypnosis to play imagined games in your mind. It is a full time job to get great, use all methods to do so.####

Chris Cass
10-15-2002, 08:17 AM
Hi ####,

No doubt. I think about pool almost every night. I have a hypnosis tape I also listen to when I sleep. It's a 21 day programed tape. I hear it while falling in and out of the REM state or Theta brain waves. As this state of mind occurs on and off during your sleep hrs. Funny, this tape will get you motivated to want to hit balls. 30 nites listening to it will drive you bonkers though. I still come back to it after every so many mths.

The guys name is, Dr. Jim Wand. I first met him in the casino hypnotizing me and a group of employees on stage for a party we had there. He gave me a free tape of my choice for being a ginney pig. It didn't seem to work on me, so I thought. Others acted like complete fools. I myself was really relaxed. I didn't take any of the suggestions but when he said our legs were heavy. I was unable to move them. So, at $15. a pop I think I'll send in for the concentration tape next. I have the pool tape. Any hypnotist that can list pool on their sports catagory? Is got my money. LOL

Regards,

C.C.~~need to make a self hypnosis tape next. They say not to use your own voice. JAT

10-15-2002, 11:34 AM
I agree that if you want to become great, nothing beats practice. On the other hand, practicing the wrong things does one no good either. As you pointed out, playing tough opponents will improve your game a lot. I credit a lot of my game to that premise.
This past Saturday I played my first tornament in a few years. While I didn't win, being pretty rusty and all, I held my own quite well. I was a little anxious because up to a couple of weeks ago I don't think I've even picked up a cue in years (literally), and haven't played seriously in six or more. In the group were a couple of shooters that I used to play against around town back when. To be honest, for my first time back I still was able to give them a solid run. For as long as I've been down, and for as long as they've been playing, they should've been able to smoke me. I'm not trying to be cocky because I don't consider myself that good of a player, I'm just stating that I was kind of surprised at my game vs. theirs. There were some really good shooters there who I know could've kicked my ass. Now, give me a couple of months to get back in the groove and we'll see. /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif
I believe that's the point though: Practice is good, but you must also be also be a true student of the game. "Natural talent" only gets you so far. There's guys out there that can bang balls around, and may give you fits at times, but they'll never be great because they don't really care to know or understand the game. Certainly, there's always exceptions, but as a general rule one needs a combination of practice, along with well grounded technique and understanding. Actually, out of the three I think understanding may be the most crucial, at least for me. I'm not satisfied with just how, "if you do A and B, you get C", but I need to know why. People get so deep into the black and white of technique that they forget about the underlying concepts of why things happen. When you understand the why, the how is easier. For example, when the cueball hits the object ball, it goes that way, but why? The average weekend banger may not know about the concept of the "tangent line", or how the multitude of variables in a shot affect the path of the cueball. I hear "hit this rail here", or, "one tip of english", etc... That's all well and good for a baseline, but in order to move beyond that level, one needs to dissect the how, gain the knowledge of why, and then use that knowledge to turn the how into something much better.
Am I making any sense? /ccboard/images/icons/blush.gif

SpiderMan
10-15-2002, 02:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Seattle-kid:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: yougottheseven:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; There's much more to it than how much you play. It always sounds good when you say that it takes "hard work" to make it to the top in any given activity, but with billiards I'm afraid to say that the single most important part of getting good is being naturally talented at the game. Don't get me wrong, I've watched people at the pool hall improve leaps and bounds over the course of the last few years, but they are still light-years away from beating some of kids who are just really gifted at shot-making and cue ball movement. Most aspects of the game can be taught, but the best players can figure out where the cue ball needs to go, how to get it there, and to not miss the shot. Also, there's a certain point where people tend to plateau. It's usually the point where you know exactly every shot in order to get out of the rack, but just miss something stupid every once in a while. The most talented players can focus enough to just simply not miss anything that they shouldn't. This game takes a combination of experience and talent that separates the good from the really good. Consistency is really the last skill to master that is by far the hardest. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;


My idea about that, is that the kids that are "naturally gifted" are really just kids that live around and get taught by some of the best players.. and kids I think learn faster (can't teach an old dog new tricks?), and are also fearless. Thats pretty dangerous combination for pool IMO. I think anyone who wants to get good should first and foremost seek out someone who is adept at the game, or a local champion, and coerce them into either playing for some money, or trading cash for actual lessons. (but not till you get the basics down good.)

Playing great players will inevitably remind you not to miss easy shots, and when you see someone run 2 or 3 racks on you, you see what is possible, and add it to your expectations of yourself, as well as give yourself a goal to reach.

I seek out the best players I can find and play them for money, mostly because thats the only way to insure I get their best game, and doing that (playing great players) gives you more of a reason to think about what you are doing BEFORE You do it, instead of afterwards like it seems most people do, and therefore you do alot better.. IMO, although there could be factual information there also, I don't know.

anyways, with enough practice, and mastery of all the tools of pool.. draw, follow, breakouts, soft shots, hard shots, etc, etc.. I think once you start to play better players, your game will rise easier, than if you aren't practicing but once a week or so. <hr></blockquote>

Sadly, I believe there is a part of this that can't be taught, any more than you can be taught to be the world's best opera singer. Years of voice lessons might make you good, but that won't be enough unless you're at the top of the heap for inborn ability also.

Practicing more, harder, and better/smarter will unboubtedly move you forward faster than otherwise. Still, at the top of the heap, will generally be guys who are better and did not work any harder or have better teachers.

I wish that a misspent youth (and a hundred pounds) were all that separated me from Buddy Hall, but that's just not the case.

SpiderMan

10-15-2002, 04:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: griffith_d:</font><hr> the hooks by the other player,...and another item that no practice can always cover,....the ability to take advantage of the other players weakness, through playing them or watching.

If a player cannot capitalize on the other person's mistakes when the time comes,...they may never become the player that they should.

Griff <hr></blockquote>

But serious practice sessions of playing safeties on yourself in a game against yourself will help you tremendously in taking advantage of someone else's weakness.. when I practice, I play just like I'm playing someone else.. I play hooks on myself, and then I try to kick at them when I'm the "other player."

True, you can't really practice playing competition, because each competition is different, but when you practice, you are developing the neccessary TOOLS to do what you need to in competition, to have the best chance at winning.. if you only practice shooting in balls, and suddenly in a match you find yourself kicking at everything, and haven't practiced it, or learned the rail system, then shooting in strait-in shots isn't going to help at all, y'know. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

10-15-2002, 04:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: ChrisS:</font><hr> I agree that if you want to become great, nothing beats practice. On the other hand, practicing the wrong things does one no good either. As you pointed out, playing tough opponents will improve your game a lot. I credit a lot of my game to that premise.
This past Saturday I played my first tornament in a few years. While I didn't win, being pretty rusty and all, I held my own quite well. I was a little anxious because up to a couple of weeks ago I don't think I've even picked up a cue in years (literally), and haven't played seriously in six or more. In the group were a couple of shooters that I used to play against around town back when. To be honest, for my first time back I still was able to give them a solid run. For as long as I've been down, and for as long as they've been playing, they should've been able to smoke me. I'm not trying to be cocky because I don't consider myself that good of a player, I'm just stating that I was kind of surprised at my game vs. theirs. There were some really good shooters there who I know could've kicked my ass. Now, give me a couple of months to get back in the groove and we'll see. /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif
I believe that's the point though: Practice is good, but you must also be also be a true student of the game. "Natural talent" only gets you so far. There's guys out there that can bang balls around, and may give you fits at times, but they'll never be great because they don't really care to know or understand the game. Certainly, there's always exceptions, but as a general rule one needs a combination of practice, along with well grounded technique and understanding. Actually, out of the three I think understanding may be the most crucial, at least for me. I'm not satisfied with just how, "if you do A and B, you get C", but I need to know why. People get so deep into the black and white of technique that they forget about the underlying concepts of why things happen. When you understand the why, the how is easier. For example, when the cueball hits the object ball, it goes that way, but why? The average weekend banger may not know about the concept of the "tangent line", or how the multitude of variables in a shot affect the path of the cueball. I hear "hit this rail here", or, "one tip of english", etc... That's all well and good for a baseline, but in order to move beyond that level, one needs to dissect the how, gain the knowledge of why, and then use that knowledge to turn the how into something much better.
Am I making any sense? /ccboard/images/icons/blush.gif
<hr></blockquote>

Yep, making perfect sense. A good example, I think, of talent Vs. practice is Minnesota fats. The guy is amazing with bank shots, trick shots, any shot.. but he's never won a world championship. Determination, practice, and hard work are the only things that'll get you ahead in life.. the easy road will take you only so far. Also, like you said, you must establish a good baseline, and learn how everything works.. I can tell people all day how to hit the easy kick shots I seem to "always make" because I understand how rails and english work, but they have no idea what difference speed, english, and finesse have to do with bank shots. As Robert Byrne says, there are alot of systems to bank shots, but the only way to really get good at banks is to bank them till they come out of your ears. I think that applies to all aspects of pool.

We're lucky we have so many books to get us started on the physics of pool, but reading about how to shoot and shooting 1,000 balls into pockets are two different things... and yield two different results.

Patrick
10-15-2002, 04:46 PM
The lower your intelligence is; the more practice you need.

Patrick

10-15-2002, 04:55 PM
<hr></blockquote>
Sadly, I believe there is a part of this that can't be taught, any more than you can be taught to be the world's best opera singer. Years of voice lessons might make you good, but that won't be enough unless you're at the top of the heap for inborn ability also.

Practicing more, harder, and better/smarter will unboubtedly move you forward faster than otherwise. Still, at the top of the heap, will generally be guys who are better and did not work any harder or have better teachers.

I wish that a misspent youth (and a hundred pounds) were all that separated me from Buddy Hall, but that's just not the case.

SpiderMan [/blockquote]




Buddy Hall most likely started before you did, played with good players since he started, and never quit or gave up, or felt that he would never be a good player. Imagine if half the pro's we see today lost their first tournament, and got pissed, broke or sold their cue and decided that pool wasn't their deal.. that they weren't "cut out" for pool, and that it was just a "stupid game." There would only be a handfull of people who DIDN'T tell themselves that stuff. Chances are, Buddy Hall isn't just good at pool either.. in fact, most people who are pro's at something, are also quite adept at alot of things. Some have determination to do their best at all times, some could care less. Some give up on life completely, and become alcoholics on skid row. Most of us are somewhere in between, with a choice to go up or down, but most of us just decide to stay where we are, because it's safer, and you don't have to make a decision.

Ok, fine and dandy, but when you're on your deathbed and look at your life, you are still safe to say "I tried, I could have, I should have, I wanted to, I wish I would have..." Or you can say "I did my best in everything I did."

10-15-2002, 04:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> The lower your intelligence is; the more practice you need.

Patrick <hr></blockquote>

So you must have practiced for some time just to get the cue out of your case. BTW, you are a wierdo, please don't write to me.

10-15-2002, 04:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> The lower your intelligence is; the more practice you need.

Patrick <hr></blockquote>

sorry patrick, but, from my experience and observation, that may be exactly the opposite of the truth. it is my opinion that there is no identifiable direct coorelation between intelligence (as normally measured) and pool proficiency.

dan

stickman
10-15-2002, 07:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: houstondan:</font><hr>
sorry patrick, but, from my experience and observation, that may be exactly the opposite of the truth. it is my opinion that there is no identifiable direct coorelation between intelligence (as normally measured) and pool proficiency.

dan <hr></blockquote>


I agree. I know some real blockheads that are great poolplayers. LOL

jbullerjr
10-15-2002, 09:34 PM
&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Seattle-kid:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;
Chances are, Buddy Hall isn't just good at pool either.. in fact, most people who are pro's at something, are also quite adept at alot of things. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

Agreed, I have know many a pool player that was a very low (if any) handicapped golfer, could bowl in the 270's, throw darts like they were from Ireland or shoot free-throws untill you are tired of counting.
As a matter of fact there is a story (don't know if it is true), that Johnny Archer was challenged by a very good college basketball player to shoot free-throws, best of a 100 for $1000. The college kid makes 93 and LOSES.

Jimbo

Patrick
10-16-2002, 05:02 AM
I practice every 2 and a half months. I am the smartest person who ever lived on earth. IQ society: <a target="_blank" href=http://vp3.0catch.com/tera.htm>http://vp3.0catch.com/tera.htm</a>

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 05:07 AM
You humans always start like this. I will not bother explaining for hours anymore, and then you humans get all silent when you know you were wrong, and you don't even give an apology.
Instead of me explaining it to you, just think about what I said.
I have never been wrong about anything, and I have proven it every time.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 05:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr> I agree. I know some real blockheads that are great poolplayers. LOL <hr></blockquote>Physical intelligence.

Patrick
10-16-2002, 06:33 AM
Intelligence and pool

There are many different kinds of intelligence, here are the most important ones that you need for pool.

Spatial intelligence

You need spatial intelligence to play pool, because you need to rotate objects around in your mind.

You don't need a high spatial IQ to play 9-ball, because 9-ball is very simple. This is why pros can play the game using only memory, experience and feel. You don't need a high intelligence for it, but for more difficult games like Rotation Straight Pool; you will need about 180 IQ to play it well. Because you need to calculate the clusters and create new shots every time. There is maybe one thousand times more shots in Rotation Straight Pool than there is in 9-ball. So remembering all of the shots would be almost impossible. So a high intelligence will be a great advantage because you need to make shots you haven't tried before.

Rotation Straight Pool is a hundred times harder than normal Rotation. Because all the balls are a big cluster and you need to break out a particular ball. It is not often you make normal position shots as in all other games. Almost always you need to carom balls into others to play position. Like in combos you need to control both the cueball and the other ball, while other balls are in the way. It is very often that you need to hit more than 3 other balls with the cueball for position. This is what I mean with calculating new shots.
Sometimes you need to calculate all the balls in the rack, so the other balls don't get into the object ball's and cueball's way. This is why you need 180 IQ.
You need to know exactly how all balls rotate.

Physical intelligence

Physical intelligence is what is the most important thing when you play with feel. A high physical intelligence means that you can control your movements better and can repeat the same movements with better consistency. The higher your physical intelligence is, the better muscle memory you have. All athletes have a very high physical intelligence, they don't to be smart to do a simple activity, they can just train the same movements over and over again until they get successful. But pool is not as simple, you need to learn many movements, especially speed control.

You can be a good player if you are not smart but have a high physical intelligence. Almost all pool players play with feel and the one with the higher physical intelligence can get better speed control. The better your muscle memory is, the more consistent your speed control will be, and you will get more speeds than another player with worse muscle memory.

You also need good muscle memory for the stance and stroke so that you use the same technique every time, if you have bad muscle memory you will not be consistent in your game and have bad and good days. Muscle memory is also a big advantage when you walk around the table and take the right step lengths so that you are setting up the shot correctly.

Perceptual threshold

Perceptual threshold is the ability to see small differences between speeds and other things. With a better perceptual threshold you will be better at knowing where the cueball will stop. If you have a high physical intelligence and a bad perceptual threshold, then you will not know where the cueball will stop but you can use the same speed again because of your good muscle memory. But if you have a good perceptual threshold and a bad physical intelligence, then you will know if you used the right or wrong speed right after you hit the cueball.

Logical intelligence

Logical intelligence means the ability to understand physics and why things happen with the balls. If you don't know why something happens, then you don't know how to correct it, the only way you can do that is by experimenting and that will take a long time. With a low logical intelligence you will play a lot with guessing what will happen. The higher your logical intelligence is, the more consistent you will be.

Do you need a high intelligence to learn faster?

The higher your intelligence is, the faster you learn, and can correct your mistakes sooner. A player with a low intelligence may need to shoot the same shot 20 times before he understands why he missed. A smarter player would understand it much sooner. Apes have half the IQ of normal humans, they don't understand that the cueball goes backwards with draw on the cueball, but humans understand it and don't need to spend so much time trying to understand it like the apes need to do.

For example with logical intelligence, if you have no knowledge and you learn this: (0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9) 10+55=65, the one with the higher logical intelligence can use this knowledge and can get the answer to 35+40=? very easily. While the person with a lower logical intelligence needs to learn how to count the new number. So you will learn much faster the higher your intelligence is.

The higher your intelligence is; the better solutions you make with the same knowledge.

Patrick

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 07:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> I practice every 2 and a half months. I am the smartest person who ever lived on earth. <hr></blockquote>
I don't know if I've ever responded to anything you've puked out on the screen, but there's a first for everything.

Quite frankly, Patrick, you are easily the second dumbest poster that's ever wiped his spit on the screen. Every character you bang out hammers out the fact that you wouldn't know human or alien intelligence if it crawled up your ass and you burped out a "take me to your leader."

Oh, and BTW, clue for you: rotation straight pool is the silliest thing that you've come up with, and you've mentioned it for several years now. You don't play it, so please don't pretend that you do. Telling continuous falsehoods is a sign of lack of intelligence. I'm sure you didn't read that in your alien handbook.

Fred &lt;~~~ wishes he could filter Patrick

Wally_in_Cincy
10-16-2002, 07:17 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>

Quite frankly, Patrick, you are easily the second dumbest poster that's ever wiped his spit on the screen. <hr></blockquote>

So who's the first? LOL

Wally~~hoping for third /ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif

Patrick
10-16-2002, 07:24 AM
Everything you said in that post was a lie.
1. You have reponded to me before.
2. I created Rotation Straight Pool less than a year ago
3. I only practice Rotation Straight Pool when I play on the computer. My video of me playing Rotation Straight Pool has been online 6 and a half months. I practice normal rotation in real pool.

Patrick

Lester
10-16-2002, 07:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Fred Agnir:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt;

Quite frankly, Patrick, you are easily the second dumbest poster that's ever wiped his spit on the screen. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

So who's the first? LOL

Wally~~hoping for third /ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif <hr></blockquote>&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Wally, it can't be me, I have a "drool cup" that I wear on a chain aroung my neck. lol ***Lester***

Patrick
10-16-2002, 07:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>I don't know if I've ever responded to anything you've puked out on the screen, but there's a first for everything.

Quite frankly, Patrick, you are easily the second dumbest poster that's ever wiped his spit on the screen. Every character you bang out hammers out the fact that you wouldn't know human or alien intelligence if it crawled up your ass and you burped out a "take me to your leader."

Oh, and BTW, clue for you: rotation straight pool is the silliest thing that you've come up with, and you've mentioned it for several years now. You don't play it, so please don't pretend that you do. Telling continuous falsehoods is a sign of lack of intelligence. I'm sure you didn't read that in your alien handbook.

Fred &lt;~~~ wishes he could filter Patrick <hr></blockquote>Don't try to delete the false things that you said about me in your post.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>I don't know if I've ever responded to anything you've puked out on the screen, but there's a first for everything.<hr></blockquote>
Remember 2 and a half years ago when I asked you about the 1-balls that went in half because of your break? I asked if you broke 35mph. You said you only break 24mph and the balls were bad quality and had production errors. You said you broke 35mph in a post 1 year before that. That was why I asked if you broke that fast. So you are lying a lot.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 07:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Quite frankly, Patrick, you are easily the second dumbest poster that's ever wiped his spit on the screen. Every character you bang out hammers out the fact that you wouldn't know human or alien intelligence if it crawled up your ass and you burped out a "take me to your leader."
<hr></blockquote>Obviously you are very jealous of me. You want to harass others and put them down only to feel better about yourself. You want to be in control of others to make you feel like are something. But you can't control me, you think you are in control, but all the time I am in control, and that is the power of a God.

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 08:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Everything you said in that post was a lie.
<hr></blockquote>
Shootin' for #1 are you?

Wishing I could filter your posts certainly isn't a lie. Not remembering if I've responded to you before isn't a lie. Thinking that Rotation Straight Pool is the silliest thing you've come up with isn't a lie. So, you're wrong again.

Fred

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 08:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Obviously you are very jealous of me. You want to harass others and put them down only to feel better about yourself. You want to be in control of others to make you feel like are something. But you can't control me, you think you are in control, but all the time I am in control, and that is the power of a God. <hr></blockquote>
I control you. I have made your blood pressure rise. I'm laughing at you now. Right now. I dare you to not respond.

Fred

Eric.
10-16-2002, 08:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> I practice every 2 and a half months. I am the smartest person who ever lived on earth. IQ society: <a target="_blank" href=http://vp3.0catch.com/tera.htm>http://vp3.0catch.com/tera.htm</a>

Patrick <hr></blockquote>

I laugh at the Tera Society. I am so smart that I look down at the lessor humans and lower alien life forms(you). I can bend spoons with my mind and leap tall buildings in a single bound. Do not underestimate my power.

Eric &gt;look- up in the sky...

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 08:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Remember 2 and a half years ago when I asked you about the 1-balls that went in half because of your break? I asked if you broke 35mph. You said you only break 24mph and the balls were bad quality and had production errors. You said you broke 35mph in a post 1 year before that. That was why I asked if you broke that fast. So you are lying a lot.<hr></blockquote>

What a maroon. I corrected your blatantly poor reading compreshension back then. Thanks for reminding me.

Fred

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Eric.:</font><hr>
I laugh at the Tera Society. I am so smart that I look down at the lessor humans and lower alien life forms(you). I can bend spoons with my mind and leap tall buildings in a single bound. Do not underestimate my power.

Eric &gt;look- up in the sky... <hr></blockquote>The difference between me and you is that you are joking and I am serious.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:14 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> Shootin' for #1 are you?

Wishing I could filter your posts certainly isn't a lie. Not remembering if I've responded to you before isn't a lie. Thinking that Rotation Straight Pool is the silliest thing you've come up with isn't a lie. So, you're wrong again.

Fred <hr></blockquote>It looks obvious that your IQ is half of mine.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>
I control you. I have made your blood pressure rise. I'm laughing at you now. Right now. I dare you to not respond.

Fred <hr></blockquote>See, I control you.

Eric.
10-16-2002, 08:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Eric.:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt;
I laugh at the Tera Society. I am so smart that I look down at the lessor humans and lower alien life forms(you). I can bend spoons with my mind and leap tall buildings in a single bound. Do not underestimate my power.

Eric &gt;look- up in the sky... &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;The difference between me and you is that you are joking and I am serious.

Patrick <hr></blockquote>

See, Patrick? You are a simple being that cannot understand the intricasies of written language. You are but a chimpanzee in the zoo of life. I can reword it so you can understand me better. Perhaps I should draw pictures so I can communicate more effectively with you. Ask me and ye shall receive.

Eric

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> I'm laughing at you now.
Fred <hr></blockquote>Only stupid people laugh. They laugh because they don't understand and have little knowledge about life.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:36 AM
Name Fred Agnir

Bio Playing: 20+ years

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:38 AM
You just can't accept the truth. Then you make excuses and lies that intelligence doesn't matter. So that you don't feel bad about yourself.

Patrick

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:40 AM
You are lying and you don't know it yourself.

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:50 AM
Patrick: The lower your intelligence is; the more practice you need.

Thread name by Seattle-kid: This game takes lots of practice

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 08:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Name Fred Agnir

Bio Playing: 20+ years
<hr></blockquote>
Ooooh, you got me there. Ouch. Ya. It hurts. The pain. How easily you figured it all out. I bow to your superiority. Your excellence.

Are you done crying yet?

Fred &lt;~~~ jealous of Patrick's inability to comprehend anything

Patrick
10-16-2002, 08:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr><blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr>Name Fred Agnir

Bio Playing: 20+ years
<hr></blockquote>
Ooooh, you got me there. Ouch. Ya. It hurts. The pain. How easily you figured it all out. I bow to your superiority. Your excellence.

Are you done crying yet?

Fred &lt;~~~ jealous of Patrick's inability to comprehend anything <hr></blockquote>Yes, bow down to God.

10-16-2002, 09:02 AM
You're showing your true colors Fred, and they sure ain't pretty.

Fred Agnir
10-16-2002, 09:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> You're showing your true colors Fred, and they sure ain't pretty. <hr></blockquote>
Another Anonymous hit and run? How quaint.

There's nothing new about my colors. I'm sure you already know that.

Fred &lt;~~~ of vocal opinion

silverbullet
10-16-2002, 09:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Fred Agnir:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; I'm laughing at you now.
Fred &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;Only stupid people laugh. They laugh because they don't understand and have little knowledge about life.

Patrick <hr></blockquote>

I always heard that a good sense of humor was a sign of good intelligence and that laughter was good for the soul. Sorry about being trite. To make this pool related, if I could not laugh at myself over the silly mistakes I make in this game, I'd be depressed all the time.

sb

SpiderMan
10-16-2002, 09:35 AM
Yes, that's the "talent" part showing up. Sure, Buddy Hall probably started young, worked hard, and had great instruction from peers. If not, he would have probably never gotten where he is. But if he hadn't also had inborn ability he might have hit a plateau at the AA or semi-pro level. To reach the top, I think you have to have both (learned and inborn).

SpiderMan

Wally_in_Cincy
10-16-2002, 09:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> You're showing your true colors Fred, and they sure ain't pretty. <hr></blockquote>

http://home.earthlink.net/~ohagnir/_uimages/Dragon.jpg

I don't know about that. I kind of like the purple. Or is that a tertiary color?

Now where did I put that "thread-lock" feature..?

Wally_in_Cincy
10-16-2002, 09:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Name Fred Agnir

Bio Playing: 20+ years
<hr></blockquote>


And you live in your parents' basement. Who's jealous of who?

Paul_Mon
10-16-2002, 09:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Only stupid people laugh. They laugh because they don't understand and have little knowledge about life.

Patrick <hr></blockquote>


I must be one dumb futher mucker because I'm laughing my a$$ off.

Patrick
10-16-2002, 09:58 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
And you live in your parents' basement. Who's jealous of who? <hr></blockquote>I don't live in a basement.

Patrick
10-16-2002, 10:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: silverbullet:</font><hr>To make this pool related, if I could not laugh at myself over the silly mistakes I make in this game, I'd be depressed all the time.

sb <hr></blockquote>You get depressed because of too little knowledge.

10-17-2002, 04:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: jbullerjr:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Seattle-kid:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;
Chances are, Buddy Hall isn't just good at pool either.. in fact, most people who are pro's at something, are also quite adept at alot of things. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

Agreed, I have know many a pool player that was a very low (if any) handicapped golfer, could bowl in the 270's, throw darts like they were from Ireland or shoot free-throws untill you are tired of counting.
As a matter of fact there is a story (don't know if it is true), that Johnny Archer was challenged by a very good college basketball player to shoot free-throws, best of a 100 for $1000. The college kid makes 93 and LOSES.

Jimbo <hr></blockquote>

I've never heard that story, but if it's true, it's amazing. However, I think people who become pro at ANYTHING do it because they pay attention to detail, never give up, and practice untill they are happy with their results (although, sometimes they're never happy..) and I think that they adopt that to everything they do, which is why a pro at something, is almost a pro at anything. There is a really good pool player here in Bremerton that can play piano like Mozart.. literally, the guy can do anything on a piano. Diciplined, results-oriented, and focused. Can't go wrong there I guess.. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

10-17-2002, 05:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> Patrick: The lower your intelligence is; the more practice you need.

Thread name by Seattle-kid: This game takes lots of practice

<hr></blockquote>

Pooped out several stupid messages: Patrick.

BTW, Your "intelligence" is comparable to the fart I just squeeked out.

10-17-2002, 05:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Patrick:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Wally_in_Cincy:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt;
And you live in your parents' basement. Who's jealous of who? &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;I don't live in a basement. <hr></blockquote>


HAAHAHAAHAH!! You live in a basement!??!!!! AHAHAHHHAHA!! No wonder you're so screwed up, you've been chewing on the lead pipes again. Don't do that.. lead is bad for the body, and can cause stupidity. As for your bed wetting and poopy diapers, I don't know.. maybe you could ask your parents to teach you how to use a toilet someday.. but first you need to rescue them from the zoo.