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View Full Version : Reagan had a way with Words



llotter
10-31-2012, 12:50 PM
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/69531_10151234660169548_1685942681_n.jpg

"This is the issue of this election: Whether we believe in our capacity for self-government or whether we abandon the American Revolution and confess that a little intellectual elite in a far-distant capital can plan our lives for us better than we can plan them ourselves."

Gayle in MD
10-31-2012, 12:53 PM
Do send that along to your fellow Repiglican Taliban.

They are trying to be dictators.

Reagan, OTOH, was a fascist, as was Milton Freidman.

Soflasnapper
10-31-2012, 01:24 PM
The Revolution was followed by an ineffective and later abandoned all-too-powerless federal government under the articles of confederation.

As of the Constitution, we had a strong federal government, as we democratically determined through our representatives. This was favored by the country, and the Federalist Party of Washington and Alexander Hamilton.

Seems as if Reagan is dissing the Constitutional regime in favor of the weak federal government under the prior articles of confederation, as more in keeping with the Revolution. I disagree, and every member of the armed services and the federal government is sworn under oath to the Constitutional regime.

The last major organized push to undo the COTUS was the rebellious Southern Confederate states. I think their argument went badly for them.

LWW
10-31-2012, 05:44 PM
Have you ever actually read a history book?

The US is not a democracy, and in it's original the states had their own house in congress to protect the rights of the individual states.

The direct election of senators gave the congress a right to buy votes obstructed only by the POTUS.

Grapenut
10-31-2012, 08:08 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Have you ever actually read a history book?

The US is not a democracy, and in it's original the states had their own house in congress to protect the rights of the individual states.

The direct election of senators gave the congress a right to buy votes obstructed only by the POTUS. </div></div>

The country preferred the Federalists and Hamilton ???? Amazing.
Kinda like this little quip from 1980 :
http://i923.photobucket.com/albums/ad77/mdmeeks1010/closerace.jpg

Qtec
11-01-2012, 01:23 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Democracy is a form of government in which all eligible citizens have an equal say in the decisions that affect their lives. Democracy allows people to participate equally—either directly or through elected representatives—in the proposal, development, and creation of laws. It encompasses social, economic and cultural conditions that enable the free and equal practice of political self-determination.

<u>Several variants of democracy exist</u>, but there are two basic forms, both of which concern how the whole body of citizens executes its will. One form of democracy is direct democracy, in which citizens have direct and active participation in the decision making of the government. In most modern democracies, the whole body of citizens remain the sovereign power but political power is exercised indirectly through elected representatives; <u>this is called representative democracy.</u> The concept of representative democracy arose largely from ideas and institutions that developed during the European Middle Ages, the Age of Enlightenment, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>and the American and French Revolutions.</span>[3] </div></div>

'No taxation without representation'.

Ring a bell?

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Bush pledges to spread democracy.

President Bush opened his second term Thursday with a promise to the people of the United States and the world -- <u>vowing to promote democracy both at home and abroad.</u>

"It is the policy of the United States to seek and support the growth of democratic movements and institutions in every nation and culture, with the ultimate goal of ending tyranny in our world," Bush said in his inaugural address after his swearing-in ceremony. </div></div>

Q

LWW
11-01-2012, 04:13 AM
You lost as soon as you made an equivalence argument between the French and American revolutions.

Qtec
11-01-2012, 05:40 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LWW</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You lost as soon as you made an equivalence argument between the French and American revolutions. </div></div>

Why is that then?


My guess is that you don't have an answer.

Q

Qtec
11-01-2012, 05:43 AM
I think I should keep count of the numerous times when asked a Q you don't have an answer.


Off the top of my head, I think we should start around the 26,333 mark.

Q /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/laugh.gif

Soflasnapper
11-01-2012, 08:33 AM
Obviously I referenced a representative democracy, which we are, as well as a Constitutional republic.

As for reading history books, evidently Reagan, not so much.

As a representative democratic republic, this system of course puts the power of government not in the hands of the public, but in the very elite in the exact distant city (whether the county seat, the state capitol, or in Washington DC) that Reagan decries as against the principles of the American Revolution.

Yes, those people in the distant city were elected by the people. But they were also elites, and mainly elected by elites (land owners, originally) or actually bought by the elites. Slaves and women were ruled without their permission of the franchise to vote, as were many others.

It actually doesn't matter how physically removed is the
city where the elites are in charge, especially when a lot of the people were debarred from voting. Still rule by elites. In our system. By its intentional and original design.

Soflasnapper
11-01-2012, 08:39 AM
The country preferred the Federalists and Hamilton ???? Amazing.

So you are another hard of reading case?

That isn't what I said, although it happens to be true. The country did favor George Washington, quite strongly, in fact. Washington was a Federalist.

What I actually said was that the country favored a strong federal government, as put in place by the COTUS (which the Federalist Party also favored).

Those dang clauses always confuse the hard of reading. Although any skilled reader could see the plain meaning.