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Gayle in MD
11-12-2012, 11:36 PM
By DEVLIN BARRETT, EVAN PEREZ and SIOBHAN GORMAN
WASHINGTON—A federal agent who launched the investigation that ultimately led to the resignation of Central Intelligence Agency chief David Petraeus was barred from taking part in the case over the summer due to superiors' concerns that he was personally involved in the case, according to officials familiar with the probe.

After being blocked from the case, the agent continued to press the matter, relaying his concerns to a member of Congress, the officials said.

New details about how the Federal Bureau of Investigation handled the case suggest that even as the bureau delved into Mr. Petraeus's personal life, the agency had to address conduct by its own agent—who allegedly sent shirtless photos of himself to a woman involved in the case prior to the investigation.



FBI officials declined to identify the agent, so he couldn't be reached to give his side of the story. The agent is now under investigation by the Office of Professional Responsibility, the internal-affairs arm of the FBI, according to two officials familiar with the matter.

The revelations address how the investigation first began and ultimately led to Mr. Petraeus's downfall as director of the CIA. The new developments also raise questions about the role played by the FBI and the adequacy of notification to administration and congressional leaders about the scandal.

The FBI agent who started the case was a friend of Jill Kelley, the Tampa woman who received harassing, anonymous emails that led to the probe, according to officials. Ms. Kelley, a volunteer who organizes social events for military personnel in the Tampa area, complained in May about the emails to a friend who is an FBI agent. That agent referred it to a cyber crimes unit, which opened an investigation.

However, supervisors soon became concerned that the initial agent might have grown obsessed with the matter, and prohibited him from any role in the investigation, according to the officials.

One official said the agent in question sent shirtless photos to Ms. Kelley well before the email investigation began, and FBI officials only became aware of them some time later. Eventually, supervisors told the agent he was to have nothing to do with the case, though he never had a formal role in the investigation, the official said.

The agent, after being barred from the case, contacted a member of Congress, Washington Republican David Reichert, because he was concerned senior FBI officials were going to sweep the matter under the rug, the officials said. That information was relayed to top congressional officials, who notified FBI headquarters in Washington.

By that point, FBI agents had determined the harassing emails had been sent by Paula Broadwell, who had written a biography of Mr. Petraeus's military command.

Investigators had also determined that Ms. Broadwell had been having an affair with Mr. Petraeus, and that the emails suggested Ms. Broadwell was suspicious of Ms. Kelley's attention to Mr. Petraeus, officials said.

The accusatory emails, according to officials, were sent anonymously to an account shared by Ms. Kelley and her husband. Ms. Broadwell allegedly used a variety of email addresses to send the harassing messages to Ms. Kelley, officials said.

One asked if Ms. Kelley's husband was aware of her actions, according to officials. In another, the anonymous writer claimed to have watched Ms. Kelley touching "him'' provocatively underneath a table, the officials said.

The message was referring to Mr. Petraeus, but that wasn't clear at the time, officials said. A lawyer for Ms. Kelley didn't respond to messages Monday seeking comment on the anonymous emails or on the alleged emails from the FBI agent. A lawyer for Ms. Broadwell also didn't respond. Neither woman has replied to requests to speak about the matter.

By then, what began as a relatively simple cyberstalking case had ballooned into a national security investigation. Mr. Petraeus and Ms. Broadwell, both of them married, had set up private Gmail accounts to contact each other, according to several officials familiar with the investigation. The FBI at one point was concerned the CIA director's email had been accessed by outsiders.

After agents interviewed Ms. Broadwell, she let them examine her computer, where they found copies of classified documents, according to the officials. Both Mr. Petraeus and Ms. Broadwell denied that he had given her the documents, and FBI officials eventually concluded they had no evidence to suggest otherwise.

Even as the probe of the relationship between Mr. Petraeus and Ms. Broadwell intensified in late summer and early fall, authorities were able to eventually rule out a security breach, though intelligence officials became concerned Mr. Petraeus had left himself exposed to possible blackmail, according to officials.

On Monday night, reporters watching Ms. Broadwell's home in Charlotte, N.C., saw federal agents conduct what appeared to be a search. An FBI spokeswoman confirmed agents were at the home but declined to say what they were doing.

A day after the Nov. 6 election, intelligence officials presented their findings to the White House. Mr. Petraeus met with White House officials last Thursday and announced his resignation the following day.

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have questioned whether Mr. Petraeus needed to resign over the affair, and some have argued that the FBI should have alerted both the White House and Congress much earlier to the potential security implications surrounding Mr. Petraeus.

In a separate twist in the tangled matter of Mr. Petraeus's resignation, the CIA disputed a theory advanced by Ms. Broadwell that insurgents may have attacked the U.S. consulate and a CIA annex in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11 in a bid to free militants being held there by the agency. Ms. Broadwell suggested that rationale for the consulate attack in an address at the University of Denver on Oct. 26.

"I don't know if a lot of you had heard this, but the CIA annex had actually taken a couple of Libyan militia members prisoner and they think the attack on the consulate was an attempt to get these prisoners back," she said then. "It's still being vetted."

A CIA spokesman said there were no militant prisoners there, noting that President Barack Obama ended CIA authority to hold detainees in 2009. "Any suggestion that the agency is still in the detention business is uninformed and baseless," said the spokesperson.

Some critics pointed to Ms. Broadwell's remarks in Denver as an indication that she may have been passing on classified information, leading to speculation that Mr. Petraeus may have been the source. Based on descriptions by U.S. officials, the romantic relationship had ended by then.

In addition, the source of her comment may not have been intelligence information, but news reports. Earlier in her address, she cited findings of a report that day by Fox News. Immediately after, she mentioned the possibility that the CIA had held militants at the site, which the Fox report also mentioned.

The Sept. 11 consulate attack resulted in the deaths of U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. One person briefed on U.S. intelligence said that reports focused on two main motives for the attack: inspiration from the violent protest that day at the U.S. embassy in Cairo, and the exhortation of al Qaeda leader Ayman al Zawahiri to avenge the death of his second in command. The possibility of attackers trying to free detainees never came up, this person said.

This week, lawmakers are slated to receive a series of closed-door briefings on both Benghazi and the FBI investigation that turned up the affair between Mr. Petraeus and Ms. Broadwell. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has one such briefing on Benghazi scheduled Tuesday. On Wednesday, leaders of the House intelligence committee—Rep. Michael Rogers, a Michigan Republican who chairs the panel and Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland, the top Democrat—will be briefed by FBI Deputy Director Sean Joyce and acting CIA director Michael Morell.

Senate intelligence committee staffers are working to schedule similar briefings. On Thursday, both the House and Senate intelligence committees were already slated to receive testimony on Benghazi from top intelligence and law-enforcement officials. The investigation that uncovered the affair is now expected to also be a central issue at those hearings, which won't be public.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.), who chairs the Senate intelligence committee complained Sunday that she and her colleagues should have been told of the Petraeus-Broadwell affair when the FBI discovered it because of national-security concerns.



http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424..._LEFTTopStories (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324439804578115410189757452.html?m od=WSJ_hpp_LEFTTopStories)


<span style="color: #990000">Notice Cantor's name isn't mentioned, even thhough we know he was in on this information?

This story is getting fishy!

Another version mentions that the FBI agent who started all of this, had political motives, and kept pushing for its release to come out before the election....hmmmmm</span>

Gayle in MD
11-12-2012, 11:38 PM
See TheBlaze’s initial story below.

FBI agents on Monday night raided the home of Paula Broadwell, the alleged mistress of former CIA director David Petraeus, WCNC reporter Dianne Gallagher reported via her official Twitter account.

Gallagher said “two men with briefcases just showed up to the Broadwell home… ran inside.” The reporter also said later “dozens of people” showed up to the North Carolina home, carrying bags and boxes inside, possibly to gather evidence.

The FBI confirmed to WBTV in Charlotte that the agents inside Broadwell’s home were with the agency. However, FBI officials would not reveal what they were looking for.

“FBI agents have been inside Paula Broadwell’s Dilworth home for about an hour now. About a dozen there, with bags/boxes, taking pics,” Gallagher posted on Twitter.

She estimated the first two agents arriving at 8:40 p.m. EST. And as of 10:40 p.m. EST, the agents, which had since multiplied, were reportedly still inside presumably collecting evidence of some sort.



http://www.theblaze.com/stories/fbi-agen...aula-broadwell/ (http://www.theblaze.com/stories/fbi-agents-reportedly-raid-the-home-of-petraeus-alleged-mistress-paula-broadwell/)





Report: FBI agent who investigated Broadwell sent shirtless photos to other woman in case;

The FBI agent who started the case was a friend of Jill Kelley, the Tampa woman who received harassing, anonymous emails that led to the probe, according to officials. Ms. Kelley, a volunteer who organizes social events for military personnel in the Tampa area, complained in May about the emails to a friend who is an FBI agent. That agent referred it to a cyber crimes unit, which opened an investigation.

However, supervisors soon became concerned that the initial agent might have grown obsessed with the matter, and prohibited him from any role in the investigation, according to the officials.

The FBI officials found that he had sent shirtless pictures of himself to Ms. Kelley, according to the people familiar with the probe.

That same agent, after being barred from the case, contacted a member of Congress, Washington Republican David Reichert, because he was concerned senior FBI officials were going to sweep the matter under the rug, the officials said.

Josh Marshall observes that Petraeus suddenly looks like the most mentally balanced person involved in this. This does seem to answer some of the lingering questions, though. Who was the “whistleblower” who tipped Reichert and, eventually, Cantor? Now we know. Why were the DOJ and FBI allegedly reluctant to share the news about Petraeus with the White House and DNI until very recently? Maybe because this scandal is almost as much of an embarrassment to them as it is to Petraeus. Why did the FBI take an unusual interest in what appeared to be an otherwise routine case of cyber-harassment? Because, if you believe the Journal, the agent involved had an unusual interest in Kelley. In fact, the Daily Beast claims to have spoken to a source who’s seen the e-mails Broadwell sent to Kelley. I was expecting there’d be death threats — “hair-raising” material, as I said in a Greenroom post this weekend. It ain’t that:

The messages were instead what the source terms “kind of cat-fight stuff.”

“More like, ‘Who do you think you are? … You parade around the base … You need to take it down a notch,’” according to the source, who was until recently at the highest levels of the intelligence community and prefers not to be identified by name…

When the FBI friend showed the emails to the cyber squad in the Tampa field office, her fellow agents noted that the absence of any overt threats.

“No, ‘I’ll kill you’ or ‘I’ll burn your house down,’” the source says. “It doesn’t seem really that bad.”

The squad was not even sure the case was worth pursuing, the source says.

“What does this mean? There’s no threat there. This is against the law?” the agents asked themselves by the source’s account.

Now we know why no criminal charges were filed. As for why Kelley has reportedly lawyered up with a verrrry pricey legal team, that’s still not entirely obvious. But the weirder this gets, the more understandable it is that she’d want top-notch lawyers on her side. All this story needs now is some sort of John Edwards angle and we’ll have achieved maximum scandal-ocity.

Exit question: Who left the mysterious Wikipedia edit on Paula Broadwell’s entry back in January?

Update: The plot thickens:

Gallagher is a reporter with WCNC in North Carolina and her Twitter timeline is filling up with reports from the scene outside Broadwell’s home. Maybe I spoke too soon about there being no charges filed in this case. But … charges for what?

Update: I assume the probable cause here has to do with those classified documents found on Broadwell’s computer. But that was weeks ago, if I have the timeline straight. Why are they only searching now?

Update: I’m still thinking about Newsweek’s source on Broadwell’s e-mails in the piece quoted above. He was “until recently at the highest levels of the intelligence community and prefers not to be identified by name” and he knows what was in the messages Broadwell sent to Kelley? Is there any obvious suspect besides Petraeus himself?

Update: Yep, sounds like the FBI’s suddenly very curious as to where Broadwell got her info:

“Menacing” anonymous emails that launched the FBI investigation which ultimately brought down CIA Director David Petraeus contained references to the “comings and goings” of high-level U.S. military officials, raising concerns that someone had improperly gained access to sensitive and classified information, a source close to the recipient tells NBC News…

What most alarmed Kelley and the FBI, the source said, were references to “the comings and goings” of high-level generals from the U.S. Central Command, which is based at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, and the U.S. Southern Command, as well as Petraeus — including events that were not on any public schedule

http://hotair.com/archives/2012/11/12/re...-woman-in-case/ (http://hotair.com/archives/2012/11/12/report-fbi-agent-who-investigated-broadwell-sent-shirtless-photos-to-other-woman-in-case/)

cushioncrawler
11-13-2012, 04:46 AM
Things hav taken a serious turn. Today down under, hillary clinton woz asked about rumours of her relationship with petraeous, and hillary sayd
"i hav not had any sexual relations with that general".
mac.

Gayle in MD
11-13-2012, 06:46 AM
/forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

Was she banging on the podium? /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/wink.gif

This FBI guy who first reported the harrassment of Jill Kelly, also a married woman, close to Patraeus, supposedly had political motives?

Only Cantor and one other Republican Senator, can't think of his name, had this information before anyone else, and the FBI guy, "Friend" of the woman in Tampa, was taken off the case because he was too involved, due to inappropriate bahavior with Kelly, and for pushing too hard to expose the story before the election?

Mind you, all of these people are Repiglicans!

Why didn't these two Republicans tell the Senate Investigating Commitee about Patraeus's compromised situation?

Why were two Republicans in on it, and neither of them informed the Senate Investigation Committee, and/or the President, who didn't even know?


Now, latest news flash, another Repiglican, and the top military commander in Afghanistan, who took over when Patraeus left, General John Allen, NATO COMMANDER, is being investigated by the Pentagon annd the Department of Defense, for having inappropriate communications with Jill Kelly, the woman who was being harrassed by Patraeus's girlfriend, Paula Broadwell! Over THIRTY THOUSAND E-MAILS OF GENERAL ALLEN, AND JILL KELLY ARE UNDER INVESTIGATION!

Hmmm, JIll, Kelly, also married, and a, ah hem, hostess and and friend of the Patraeus family, who hosts military generals in Tampa. /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif

Wonder if she's an Evangelical, LMAO! /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/shocked.gif /forums/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/grin.gif

<span style='font-size: 11pt'>Federal Law says Congressional Intelligence Committees must be notified of all Intelligence Activities.</span>

What a tangled web of inappropriate Republican screwing around and hiding information, and failing to notify the appropriate higher ups! PANETTA WASN'T EVEN TOLD!

ALL Veeeewy Fishy Mac....

cushioncrawler
11-13-2012, 04:28 PM
Elections kan be long and hard. And for sure the timing sounds like an interior motive.
Where will this all end.

If anyone here haz rooted someone they shoodnt in the past 10yrs and if that someone rooted someone else who rooted someone else who rooted someone else who rooted someone else who rooted someone else who rooted someone else who rooted someone else, then its 50/50 that u will show up in the fbi's investigation.

Hey a two black cars just pulled up outside your place. Made u look didnt i.
mac.

Gayle in MD
11-13-2012, 09:15 PM
Nope, I didn't have to look friend.

Guess I'm one of the lucky ones.

G.