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View Full Version : Why I hate the GOP...#2



Qtec
11-15-2012, 03:11 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 14pt'>Gov. Perry vows to drug test unemployed Texans</span>

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) said Tuesday that he’s throwing his support to proposals that would require applicants for unemployment benefits and food stamps to submit to a urine analysis drug screening.

“We have to remember a core mission that has been trusted to us by the people of the state: to wisely and prudently safeguard the taxpayer’s dollars and empower every Texan to reach their potential,” he said, adding that the program was part of his strategy to keep Texas “fiscally responsible.”

Perry specifically backed Senate Bill 11, proposed by Texas Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), <u>which emulates a similar drug testing regime implemented by Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R). </u>Nelson’s proposal, however, focuses on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program only, meaning what Perry said Tuesday actually applies to an even broader policy that’s not yet been formally proposed.

But to get a picture of how it might play out in Texas, Florida’s program could serve as a valuable example. That state’s effort was<u> plagued with numerous problems</u> before a judge temporarily suspended it in October pending further hearings, in response to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>“People don’t lose their Fourth Amendment rights or any rights just because they happen to be poor or were asking for extra assistance to make ends meet,”</span> ACLU Florida spokesperson Baylor Johnson told Raw Story. “That’s not what the Constitution says. The Constitution is clear that the right to be protected against an unreasonable, suspicionless search by the government applies to everyone uniformly.”

In addition to the drug tests being a potentially illegal search, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>The New York Times noted in April that only about 2 percent of applicants in Florida were denied benefits due to failed drug tests, saving just $45,780 in total, even though the program itself cost $118,140.</span> In a state like Texas, that such a program could actually be a lot more expensive: Florida has 6.6 million fewer people than Texas, and and only 16.5 percent of them live in poverty, whereas in Texas it’s 17.9 percent. To make matters worse, Texas had 2.7 million people receiving some kind of state aid in 2010, whereas Florida had 1.7 million.

<span style='font-size: 20pt'>In other words, Florida actually ended up “spending more money reimbursing people who passed the test than they did saving money based upon failed tests,” Johnson said.</span>

More problematic, with Republicans running the state in Texas for so long, unemployment and food stamp benefits have been repeatedly cut back and retooled. As The Dallas Morning News noted, “almost all of Texas’ benefit programs are geared towards children, including food stamps.<span style='font-size: 14pt'> So does it do any good to deny benefits to kids for a year because the adult in their life used pot or other drugs?”</span>


</div></div>

Morons.

Rick wanted to prove that those needing assistance were good for nothing drug users and he failed miserably.

<span style="color: #3333FF"><span style='font-size: 20pt'>[ Thanks Rick..another RW myth DESTROYED!!!]</span></span>

No money was saved and it actually cost them money! Now Rick 'oops' wants to do the same! Just like they want to repeat the failed 'Bush tax cuts for the rich' scheme.

If you did a spot check/drug test on every member of congress, how many would fail?

I swear, half the GOP would not pass a psychological test for sanity.

This is just more class warfare.

Q...... link (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/11/14/gov-perry-vows-to-drug-test-unemployed-texans/)

eg8r
11-15-2012, 09:08 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) said Tuesday that he’s throwing his support to proposals that would require applicants for unemployment benefits and food stamps to submit to a urine analysis drug screening.</div></div>This is a fantastic idea. Anyone who needs government assistance should not be spending their money on drugs. It might cost some money in the beginning but it will saved more money down the road. I thought lefties understood this phenomena when they were trying to ram it down our throats during the last 4 years.

eg8r

Soflasnapper
11-15-2012, 09:14 AM
Your position indicates a need for a proctological exam to address a cranial intrusion.

It will NOT save money, because it did NOT save money. Perhaps Rick Perry is not as corrupt as Rick Scott, as it wasn't his wife's medical testing company that was directly benefited (as was the case here in Florida).

Which is a side issue compared to the fact that this will cost, not save, any state millions of dollars on a net benefit accounting.

It's punitive, and political grandstanding to the ignoratii, period.

Gayle in MD
11-15-2012, 09:18 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Qtec</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style='font-size: 14pt'>Gov. Perry vows to drug test unemployed Texans</span>

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) said Tuesday that he’s throwing his support to proposals that would require applicants for unemployment benefits and food stamps to submit to a urine analysis drug screening.

“We have to remember a core mission that has been trusted to us by the people of the state: to wisely and prudently safeguard the taxpayer’s dollars and empower every Texan to reach their potential,” he said, adding that the program was part of his strategy to keep Texas “fiscally responsible.”

Perry specifically backed Senate Bill 11, proposed by Texas Sen. Jane Nelson (R-Flower Mound), <u>which emulates a similar drug testing regime implemented by Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R). </u>Nelson’s proposal, however, focuses on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program only, meaning what Perry said Tuesday actually applies to an even broader policy that’s not yet been formally proposed.

But to get a picture of how it might play out in Texas, Florida’s program could serve as a valuable example. That state’s effort was<u> plagued with numerous problems</u> before a judge temporarily suspended it in October pending further hearings, in response to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida.

<span style='font-size: 14pt'>“People don’t lose their Fourth Amendment rights or any rights just because they happen to be poor or were asking for extra assistance to make ends meet,”</span> ACLU Florida spokesperson Baylor Johnson told Raw Story. “That’s not what the Constitution says. The Constitution is clear that the right to be protected against an unreasonable, suspicionless search by the government applies to everyone uniformly.”

In addition to the drug tests being a potentially illegal search, <span style='font-size: 14pt'>The New York Times noted in April that only about 2 percent of applicants in Florida were denied benefits due to failed drug tests, saving just $45,780 in total, even though the program itself cost $118,140.</span> In a state like Texas, that such a program could actually be a lot more expensive: Florida has 6.6 million fewer people than Texas, and and only 16.5 percent of them live in poverty, whereas in Texas it’s 17.9 percent. To make matters worse, Texas had 2.7 million people receiving some kind of state aid in 2010, whereas Florida had 1.7 million.

<span style='font-size: 20pt'>In other words, Florida actually ended up “spending more money reimbursing people who passed the test than they did saving money based upon failed tests,” Johnson said.</span>

More problematic, with Republicans running the state in Texas for so long, unemployment and food stamp benefits have been repeatedly cut back and retooled. As The Dallas Morning News noted, “almost all of Texas’ benefit programs are geared towards children, including food stamps.<span style='font-size: 14pt'> So does it do any good to deny benefits to kids for a year because the adult in their life used pot or other drugs?”</span>


</div></div>

Morons.

Rick wanted to prove that those needing assistance were good for nothing drug users and he failed miserably.

<span style="color: #3333FF"><span style='font-size: 20pt'>[ Thanks Rick..another RW myth DESTROYED!!!]</span></span>

No money was saved and it actually cost them money! Now Rick 'oops' wants to do the same! Just like they want to repeat the failed 'Bush tax cuts for the rich' scheme.

If you did a spot check/drug test on every member of congress, how many would fail?

I swear, half the GOP would not pass a psychological test for sanity.

This is just more class warfare.

Q...... link (http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/11/14/gov-perry-vows-to-drug-test-unemployed-texans/)
</div></div>

Deserves repeating.



<span style="color: #990000"> <span style='font-size: 26pt'>Morons.

</span> </span>


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