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View Full Version : Goin' "Jump Dumb"



10-17-2002, 07:54 AM
I've recently gone from successfully hitting 8 of 10 jumps to miscueing miserably on 6-10. Have any of you jump artists gotten into this rut, and if so how did you figure out the reason for the sudden reverse in ability with the JC? My first sideline response from the peanut gallery is "Maybe you need to put a little chalk on that tip" and basically I did that, BUT when my jumps are working for me I have no problem getting air without chalk, so chalk is not the premier answer(imo.) My next experiment is to pull the Lucasi back out of mothballs and see if that cue automatically hops alive for me. Something tells me that there must be a key fundamental in my approach that I am missing...ideas anyone???sid

Jay M
10-17-2002, 08:27 AM
this is going to sound strange. BUT, did you start playing on a different table?

On the tables in the two rooms where I normally shoot, jump shots are easy for me to hit (with a playing cue), even from close range.

On the table at my brother's house, I can't get the cue off the carpet. There isn't really any difference between the tables that is noticable, I just plain can't get the cue up.

Jay M

10-17-2002, 08:55 AM
Yes and no. I usually have great succes on Simonas(home table), have had good results at the usual PH stop of mine but it is now diminished sadly on @ the PH, and last night terribly at a new hall we adopted for the fall league season. Funny thing is that the first league night we shot out of there I was practicing on a side table between sets and was jumping and making controlled hits into pocket no less, incorporating curve and follow on some even. Now for some reason the darn thing just bunts off and I usually lose a game, and it isn't anything more that a straight jump for a clean hit, not anything fancy expected.

It's gotta be something in me, or else the tip has changed. The Lucasi will rule out #2. Thanks for the reply Jay...sid

Rod
10-17-2002, 10:05 AM
ES, Fundamentally my dear Watson, take the hit out of your stroke. We ain't boxing here.

~~~Sherlock thinks Watson has stroke deficiencies sometimes

10-17-2002, 11:45 AM
The first place I look when I have a problem is myself. It is almost always a result of a flaw that has crept into my stroke mechanics. The key to correcting these flaws is to be consciously aware of each of the steps in your stroke execution so that you can go through the checklist and identify where the problem exists. Once you identify the flaw it's usually fairly easy to correct. This should not be confused with thinking about your mechanics during play, that's not the same thing. Two common reasons for missed jumps are dropping your elbow and/or grasping the stick. Your tip probably isn't hitting the cue ball where you intend. Temporarily watching the tip and cueball during the shot, instead of the object ball, might tell you if that's the problem. Look to yourself rather than tips, ferrules, cues, tables, rooms and alignments of the planets.

Rod
10-17-2002, 12:33 PM
Quote Anon"Two common reasons for missed jumps are dropping your elbow and/or grasping the stick."

My point exactly, I just used a lot less words. Of course I and some others only repeated ourself here many times and get the idea some people aren't paying attention. So I just abbreviate my replies. Good post, you have to know what's broke before you can fix it.

Sid_Vicious
10-17-2002, 12:43 PM
"Two common reasons for missed jumps are dropping your elbow and/or grasping the stick."

I'm using the dart stroke, so these reasons are kinda out of relevence aren't they????sid

10-17-2002, 01:53 PM
I use the dart stroke as well and I repeatedly find myself erring by grasping the stick. As in actually tossing a dart, the throwing motion requires you to actually "release" the stick briefly so that it can bounce off the cue ball. I tend to recatch the stick too early sometimes, thus trapping the ball against the slate. I usually do this when I haven't practiced those specialized stroke mechanics in awhile. Simply using the dart stroke doesn't automaticaly eliminate the possibility of the specific problem of "grasping " the stick.

Rod
10-17-2002, 02:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> "Two common reasons for missed jumps are dropping your elbow and/or grasping the stick."

I'm using the dart stroke, so these reasons are kinda out of relevence aren't they????sid <hr></blockquote>

I didn't know it was a dart stroke, but that makes little difference. You can still drop your elbow and grasp the cue. You have an unwanted motion in there somewhere, think about it. How else can you miscue without some maneuver that your not aware of.

Quote Anon"The key to correcting these flaws is to be consciously aware of each of the steps in your stroke execution so that you can go through the checklist and identify where the problem exists.-snip

You need to be aware of your muscles before and during the shot and any tension that creeps in. It is extremely common to have your grip pressure change over or under. When this happens it turns into a jab, note my boxing comment earlier.
Along with that it will create some unwanted movements that your not aware of, such as elbow, arm or even slight body movements that throws your vision off a slight amount, it doesn't take much. Constant grip pressure is a key element over or under. Some will start out with a light grip and the minute the cue starts forward, downward in this case I can visually see the change. The forward motion is no longer a smooth progressive acelleration, it is a hit at. I realize it is a fine line, but it is one that you obviously have done well at times in the past. I suggest that you be very aware of this fact. Remember it ain't rocket science the only thing that contacts the c/b is the tip. Your hand wrist and lower arm guide that tip via your forward motion on the cue. If your out of balance when you begin that's another problem. I can't see anything from here but I have a good idea of what I would see, and sorry to say it would not be limited to your dart stroke from what I have read in the past.

I'm not trying to be an A$$ hole here Sid, I really just want you to understand and be "aware" of what your doing. I'm just trying to help and over the internet It may seem I'm a little harsh, but I assure you in person I'm not that way. In person it is much easier to show and describe. It is hard to cover small details or questions without a hell of a lot of text, and even then may not get the point across.

~~~ rod would like to spend a day or two with ole Sid, who knows I might end some of your frustrations, now about my frustrations, well we all have them

Sid_Vicious
10-17-2002, 02:22 PM
I hadn't read any aggression into your suggestions. I actually internalized immediately about what you suggested, and I know that it has to be the key...like you said, I did it well for a stretch of time. To be completely up front, I practiced a tad in-between sets last night and twice in a row I put a fluid, non stressed stroke into the cue ball and it felt "right." It didn't hold up later when it needed to, but that's not surprising since my practice sample consisted of about 5 minutes and two successes.

The way I see this is similiar to trying to tell someone how to draw a ball. I know that I didn't draw a ball well at all for the better part of the years I played pool cuz I was trying to hard and jabbed the CB or clutched the cue hard at the wrong time. What you are saying is much the same thing...I just need to practice the shot, novel approach huh ;-) sid