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View Full Version : Do You Keep Gettin' Back On The Horse?



03-05-2002, 05:47 PM
I have a player who has collected my wallet's innards twice now, but the the spot the second time has now allowed me to be
ridiculously close to getting into his pocket instead of the first experience. Question is whether you'd beat the path to play
this guy. Thing is though, there seems to be a serious mental block that kicks in when the game is finished for all practical
purposes(maybe a semi hanging key shape ball ahead of your money ball back down table for a hill-hill win) and "the
gremlins" seems to make something go wrong and there's another loss. In other words, you choke! Bottom line is that with
the economy and the financial situation I can't play relaxed knowing that more lost money will REALLY depress me.

Is it good or bad advice to become persistent and go back to play the guy, or is it stupid to play under these "I can't afford
to lose" conditions? Some times I think that proving I am on top will really add character, and sometimes I sense rail bird
friends of mine are thinking that I am a fool tossing money, and the depression pit just gets dug deeper. Advice????sid

Troy
03-05-2002, 06:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: SidVicious:</font><hr> I have a player who has collected my wallet's innards twice now, but the the spot the second time has now allowed me to be
ridiculously close to getting into his pocket instead of the first experience. Question is whether you'd beat the path to play
this guy. Thing is though, there seems to be a serious mental block that kicks in when the game is finished for all practical
purposes(maybe a semi hanging key shape ball ahead of your money ball back down table for a hill-hill win) and "the
gremlins" seems to make something go wrong and there's another loss. In other words, you choke! Bottom line is that with
the economy and the financial situation I can't play relaxed knowing that more lost money will REALLY depress me.

Is it good or bad advice to become persistent and go back to play the guy, or is it stupid to play under these "I can't afford
to lose" conditions? Some times I think that proving I am on top will really add character, and sometimes I sense rail bird
friends of mine are thinking that I am a fool tossing money, and the depression pit just gets dug deeper. Advice????sid <hr></blockquote>

I know two guys who play each other all the time. The nice guy of the two always thinks he has a chance because of the spot and he even occasionally wins a few sessions. The other guy is really quite the jerk and nobody likes, he refuses to get into a truly fair match-up and constantly wants to adjust the spot even if he gets only one set down.

I don't know if this addresses your post, maybe just "food for thought".....

Troy

stickman
03-05-2002, 06:35 PM
Sid, this sounds like my story. I just keep going back. I get no real enjoyment beating someone that I'm expected to beat. The guy I regularly play is a 7 and I'm a 5 wannabe. I beat him occassionally. I've even beat him heads up a few times. I usually feel that I'm paying for the lessons. He always comes out on top in the long run. Recently, my finances are in a wreck. I became disabled and have high medical bills. I'm not so disabled I can't still enjoy a good game of pool. I honestly can't afford to shot with him now, knowing the chances of my winning are poor. For the time being, I'll go to the back tables and practice. When the finances are better, I'll go at it again. I just don't know any better. :-)

cheesemouse
03-05-2002, 08:10 PM
Sid, I think your answer is in your post.Is it good or bad advice to become persistent and go back to play the guy, or is it stupid to play under these "I can't afford
to lose" conditions? My mentor used to call it 'funny money'. "If your money is funny your gonna get beat" he'd say and over the years I believe he was right on. As for the rail birds they are people who used to play till someone ripped their heart out and now they can't handle the pressure but they love to watch it happen over and over "like a nightmare" /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif
Lower the bet and kick the guy. Good luck!

Chris Cass
03-05-2002, 09:56 PM
Sid I've been gambling since I was 14 yrs old and can tell you this. Scared money don't win and you'll never catch money if you chase it.
Regards,
C.C.~~fire when the odds are on your side. When you have some fun money. You can't sweat the doe, it's Murphy's Law.

03-05-2002, 11:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris Cass:</font><hr> Sid I've been gambling since I was 14 yrs old and can tell you this. Scared money don't win and you'll never catch money if you chase it.
Regards,
C.C.~~fire when the odds are on your side. When you have some fun money. You can't sweat the doe, it's Murphy's Law. <hr></blockquote>

This advice coming from a guy who posted a couple of months ago about "Betting the mortgage" or something to that effect.
If that ain't scared money, I don't know what is! Personally, for me I admit I can't/couldn't (currently not gambling) play worth a crap if my finances were tight. Is it a weakness? Maybe, but gambling with "The Bills money" and losing leads to many more problems than pride in the PH.
Sid I don't think this necesarrily has anything to do about gettin' back on the horse. I think it is a sign of some intelligence /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Rod
03-06-2002, 03:08 AM
Well Sid sometimes you have to kick, bite, claw or do anything possible to win. When you stop and think about how you lost, easy shot, hit it too hard, shot to fast, jumped on the stroke ect, you have to beat that into your head. The next time try real hard to eliminate that stuff. It cerantly would be a character builder, and I'd forget about what you think people may think.
But I really believe you should give it a rest or play for what you can afford. For most people if money is an issue it will come back to haunt your game. It sounds like it does that right now. Its your money, either play better or settle for some quality practice. Some time away from the gambling and a regroup may be what you need. It will give you time to see things more clearly.

Rich R.
03-06-2002, 06:36 AM
Sid, never gamble with money that you can not afford to lose. The thoughts of losing the money totally take over your mind and the thought process of playing goes in the toilet. JMHO. Rich R.~~~not currently gambling, but has experience.

03-06-2002, 08:49 AM
Sid, there is enough pressure just trying to win a match, not to mention the added pressure of knowing you can't really afford to lose the $$ wagered. However, I fully understand the intense desire to beat someone, from a financial standpoint as well as a pride/self-esteem standpoint. I truly believe that the best way to take your game to it's full potential is to play against players better than you. It sounds like this guy fits the bill, therefore you need to figure out a way to keep playing him. A couple of options: 1) Find someone who likes to gamble (but may not play pool) to stake you then you are relieved of the added financial pressure 2) Get him to adjust the weight/spot just a bit more and lower the bet to a level you are comfortable with. Once you beat him, the mental block will probably disappear and you'll find out you may not need as much weight as he's offering! Good luck!

dave
03-06-2002, 01:14 PM
Play some money games against some weaker players with a fair spot. Stash those winnings away until you have enough to play this stronger player with the money. This way you can tell yourself your always playing on someone elses money and it will have no impact on your personal finances. You're just building a stake. That's what road players would do when they lose their bankroll; you're just doing it on a smaller scale (I think?). Never mix gambling with your personal finances. I used to go into my room with $5 bucks. If I built it into something that day, say $100 - $200, I'd stick my original $5 in another pocket and be mentally playing with other's cash all day, always knowing I'd walk out with what I came in with; no scared money factor at all! If I lost the $5 bucks off the bat, so what!, that told me that I had no business playing pool that day and found out quick and cheap.

Drake
03-06-2002, 02:04 PM
If you want to improve your game, YOU MUST get back on the horse. Dust yourself off, Evaluate how good or bad you played, and Get back On and hold on...because you will get thrown again.