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03-05-2002, 08:32 PM
any recommendations for a beginner pool player on what cues to buy?

any idea what brand of cues are jeanette lee and efren reyes using?

03-05-2002, 09:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: atomicpsg:</font><hr> any recommendations for a beginner pool player on what cues to buy?<hr></blockquote>

Depends how much you wanna spend. For under $200, you can find a lower end McDermott or Viking. They aren't GREAT sticks, but (since you're a beginner) you'll feel good about yourself b/c they carry a big name. In the $200-$400 range, look for a Pechauer or Joss...or maybe do yourself a favor and get a Scruggs sneaky pete. They are running ~$300.

Anything over $500, go custom.

AVOID MEUCCI LIKE THE PLAGUE.

03-05-2002, 10:30 PM
IMHO Action is a pretty good cue. You can get most of the cues in this line for under $200. But like the other poster said, it depends on what you are willing to spend.

Also some of the graphite cues are pretty decent.

If you are just starting on your search, make sure to go to a pro shop and try out a few cues that you are interested in and see how they feel. THEN, do a search on the ineternet for the cues that you have narrowed it down to and visit a few websites. Check for their specials. Some offer FREE shipping, cases and more.

I got my cue and case from OzoneBilliards.com and got a GREAT deal!

Good Luck!
Sure Shot

03-06-2002, 01:13 AM
I'll give you an honest answer as an instructor. If you are truly a beginner, a house cue is all the cue that you need for now. If you truly must have your own cue, then try a Dufferin Sneaky Pete (here in Canada, about $50.00). All you need is something that is reasonably straight, with a decent tip on it. I guarantee that as you progress, you will start to get an idea of the sort of weight, balance, tip size etc. that you want. You won't get this right the first time (nobody does, don't sweat it) so spend as little money as possible. This is why I say to use a good quality house cue. You might even think about buying a new (or second hand) Dufferin high run house cue (should run you about $10 -$ 15.00) and have a cue repair guy put a decent quality tip on it. Then see if you can keep it behind the counter in your local room so that you can play with it whenever you come in.

A beginner has so much to learn (stance, bridge, grip, aiming, stroke and so on) that the last thing that you should be worried about at this point is a new cue.

Tony

Jay M
03-06-2002, 12:20 PM
I disagree with avoiding Meucci. I've shot with many different cues over the years, but find myself going back to Meucci after a short time nearly every time I switch.

Now with the red dot shafts, you don't have that patented Meucci flex to deal with and they play comparably to most of the other cues on the market.

I also tend to agree somewhat with Tony in that you don't really need to go out and buy a high end cue right away. Personally, I'd say just get a sneaky pete (two piece cue that looks like a house cue). You can get a quality one for about $90-$120 and they resell for about $50 so you're not investing that much money in the cue and if you are like me, when you get a new cue, your old one becomes your breaking cue anyhow.

Jay M

SPetty
03-06-2002, 01:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Tony:</font><hr> I'll give you an honest answer as an instructor. If you are truly a beginner, a house cue is all the cue that you need for now.

A beginner has so much to learn (stance, bridge, grip, aiming, stroke and so on) that the last thing that you should be worried about at this point is a new cue.

Tony <hr></blockquote>

Hi Tony,

I'm not an instructor, so I may be way off base here. But I think that if a beginner gets a good decent cue to start with, then that is one less thing to have to fret over when learning. If a player has a clunky crappy cue to start with, it won't be as enjoyable to learn all those other things (stance, bridge, grip, aiming, stroke and so on).

On the other hand, if a player spends a little time and effort up front to get a decent cue that someone with expertise suggests, the player will have confidence in the cue and therefore enjoy learning all those other things (stance, bridge, grip, aiming, stroke and so on) better.

TomBrooklyn
03-06-2002, 01:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous(Tony):</font><hr> ...If you truly must have your own cue, then try a Dufferin Sneaky Pete (here in Canada, about $50.00) <hr></blockquote>Or a Thompson plain SP for about the same price. It's a nice cue and comes with a Water Buffalo tip standard, but you can get most other tips, and a pro taper on the shaft for a few bucks more. www.thompsoncues.com (http://www.thompsoncues.com)

03-06-2002, 04:43 PM
"On the other hand, if a player spends a little time and effort up front to get a decent cue that someone with expertise suggests, the player will have confidence in the cue and therefore enjoy learning all those other things (stance, bridge, grip, aiming, stroke and so on) better. "

In theory I agree with you. The problem is that a cue that works well for one person might not work well for another. Another problem is that a beginner has no idea of the characteristics that they want or need in a cue, they need table time more than anything else.

Finally, a good house cue is in no way a clunky hunk of junk! Some are very serviceable and are perfectly useful to learn the fundamentals of the game with.

Tony

Tom_In_Cincy
03-06-2002, 05:04 PM
There have been some very good suggestions (except the ones about Meucci Cues, these are still good to get for beginners)
Whatever you get, remember to take care of it.. get a case for protection, and don't leave the case and cue in your car, bring it in, out of the changing weather. This cue just might end up being your break cue, once you have found the cue you really want.

MaineEAck
03-06-2002, 05:33 PM
I think a ggod sneaky pete is the best bet to start... IMO