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Sid_Vicious
10-25-2002, 09:43 AM
I am looking for a supplier who sells the various pins for shaft spinning in a drill motor. I hear that some of not all of the maintainence kits are made for lathes and won't fir motor chucks. Anybody with a good source for these.

Thanks,
Sid

Paul_Mon
10-25-2002, 10:08 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I am looking for a supplier who sells the various pins for shaft spinning in a drill motor. I hear that some of not all of the maintainence kits are made for lathes and won't fir motor chucks. Anybody with a good source for these.

Thanks,
Sid <hr></blockquote>


Sid,
All you really need to do is go to Home Depot and purchase bolts with whatever thread you need. Cut the head off the bolt and you've got the pin. Usually if you buy a longer version of the bolt it does not have threads the entire length and they chuc up in a drill just fine.

Paul Mon

Rod
10-25-2002, 10:44 AM
Sid, as Paul suggested you should be able to buy them locally. The 5/16" std and SAE will be no problem. The 5/16" x 14 and the 3/8" x 10 might be a problem. Check with ACE also. There are always large supply houses that specialize in nuts, bolts, etc. Have Spidey cut threads with his lathe if necessary. So you'll know I have a set that I got from Toms QStix in Nebraska a few years ago. It was about $20 and I was buying cues from him so I just threw a set in with my cue orders.

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 10:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I am looking for a supplier who sells the various pins for shaft spinning in a drill motor. I hear that some of not all of the maintainence kits are made for lathes and won't fir motor chucks. Anybody with a good source for these.<hr></blockquote>
For a drill chuck, Shaftmaster sells them for $20/pin

http://www.shaftmaster.com/order.htm

Unique Inc. and Atlas Supply probably sell them, too.

Fred

10-25-2002, 11:22 AM
Check out the ones on ebay under "cue repair tools". Even if you don't buy theirs, the pictures are good enough to help you make your own. For the money though they give you a lot.

Sid_Vicious
10-25-2002, 11:24 AM
I'll take my 3-6 along with a variety of shafts along and try that. I had heard that the thread patterns were difficult to match so I haven't even tried that avenue. Thanks, sid

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 12:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I'll take my 3-6 along with a variety of shafts along and try that. I had heard that the thread patterns were difficult to match so I haven't even tried that avenue. Thanks, sid <hr></blockquote>
For difficult-to-get threads, I know someone who scavenged sets of cheap joint protectors.

Fred

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 12:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I am looking for a supplier who sells the various pins for shaft spinning in a drill motor. I hear that some of not all of the maintainence kits are made for lathes and won't fir motor chucks. Anybody with a good source for these.<hr></blockquote>
Maybe I wasn't very clear on my post. Shaftmaster makes a lathe that uses an ordinary keyless Jacobs drill chuck. I assume that the drive pins will fit any Jacobs Chuck. They better, because I mounted a Jacobs Chuck on a fan motor and if I ever get off my lazy ass, I'll finish the project with some plywood and drive pins (probably from Shaftmaster).

Hope this helps,

Fred

SpiderMan
10-25-2002, 12:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Paul_Mon:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Sid_Vicious:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; I am looking for a supplier who sells the various pins for shaft spinning in a drill motor. I hear that some of not all of the maintainence kits are made for lathes and won't fir motor chucks. Anybody with a good source for these.

Thanks,
Sid &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;


Sid,
All you really need to do is go to Home Depot and purchase bolts with whatever thread you need. Cut the head off the bolt and you've got the pin. Usually if you buy a longer version of the bolt it does not have threads the entire length and they chuc up in a drill just fine.

Paul Mon

<hr></blockquote>

Paul,

The hardware stores I have seen carry only the most-common 5/16 x 14 TPI bolt. I used one of those to make a "shaft spinner". But for the 5/16 x 18 (schon, etc) and the 3/8 x 10 (and variants), the hardware stores come up empty. I've bought some threaded pins from Atlas, but they are threaded the entire length and not convenient for this project. Atlas also sells "maintenance kits" with both male and female ends to spin either a shaft or butt, but unfortunately the "chuckable" ends are so large in diameter that they won't work in a hand drill.

SpiderMan

stickman
10-25-2002, 01:28 PM
Sid, here's what I use. Poolguy gave me the idea, and it works great. I went to the medical supply store and purchased a crutch foot that fits snuggly over the joint end of a shaft. I drilled a hole through the center and put a nut and bolt through. I chuck the bolt up and slip any shaft into the crutch foot. I have a bearing pressed into a 2x4 with a rubber lining inside the bearing that fits the other end of the shaft snuggly. It works fine for what I want to do.

10-25-2002, 01:39 PM
You got those numbers backwards, but I know you know and it was a mistake. I just wanted to correct it.

10-25-2002, 01:45 PM
You may run into a problem with a fan motor. Most fan motors turn clock wise and it needs to turn counter clock wise if you are using a screw mount. What happens is. when you try to work on the shaft it may come spinning off the screw because of the rotation. It is just something to keep in mind when selection a motor.

SpiderMan
10-25-2002, 01:59 PM
Anon is correct, I was typing fast with a lot on my mind (trying to get a lot done before catching that plane to Baltimore). The 5/16" x 18 TPI is the most common thread and can be found in any hardware store. The 5/16" x 14 TPI is not to be found as a common bolt. Meucci uses 18 TPI, Schon uses 14. My Jacoby also uses 14, but the thread is modified depth/dia and won't screw onto a garden-variety 5/16 x 14 pin. There are probably others so afflicted, and if you had to come up with a complete set to fit all shafts you'd probably never finish adding one here and there /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif

SpiderMan

SpiderMan
10-25-2002, 02:06 PM
Stickman,

That's a good idea, and I'm going to make one for myself (and one for Sid also, I'm sure). There was a guy (now deceased) around here who used to have a similar setup years ago, but I never looked closely enough at it to note what the "gripping end" was made from.

SpiderMan

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 02:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: stickman:</font><hr> I have a bearing pressed into a 2x4 with a rubber lining inside the bearing that fits the other end of the shaft snuggly. It works fine for what I want to do. <hr></blockquote>
How did you rubber line the bearing? And what size bearing did you use. I assume it's a flange roller bearing (or no flange).

Fred &lt;~~~ looking to honorably steal the idea

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 02:16 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> You may run into a problem with a fan motor. Most fan motors turn clock wise and it needs to turn counter clock wise if you are using a screw mount. What happens is. when you try to work on the shaft it may come spinning off the screw because of the rotation. It is just something to keep in mind when selection a motor. <hr></blockquote>

I was wondering about this. What if I mount it in the standard drill chuck way with the left-hand and right-hand thread configuration?

Fred

Fred Agnir
10-25-2002, 02:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: DragonSlayer:</font><hr> Good point. If the motor does not turn the right way, a screw with left hand threads could be used. <hr></blockquote>

Normally, a threaded drill chuck has a feature to put a small left handed screw to lock the chuck to the right-hand threaded mount. In that way, the chuck doesn't spin out on rotation. I haven't yet put this feature into use because I was hoping that at the lower speed the chuck wouldn't spin out. But it probably will.

Fred

heater451
10-25-2002, 02:32 PM
These are made/sold by Joe Picone ( www.piconecues.com (http://www.piconecues.com) )--I just added the URL for reference, it's still "under construction".

As Anonymous posted, you can search on eBay for "cue repair tools". The photos look like aluminum, but they are regular, black delrin (I think he mentions that in the sales blurb). **edit** If you want to skip having to wait on the auction, just send a note/question through eBay, or go here: http://www.piconecues.esmartbiz.com/cues/price_and_orde.html

I bought a set, a few months back, and they work pretty well in a drill. I only used them for a little bit of shaft work, but they should hold up for a good while under heavier use. In any case, you could only beat the price, if you built them yourself, but the time involved makes them worth it.

Also, you will need some kind of support, like a steady rest setup. (Stickman's rubber-lined bearing idea sounds good. . . .)




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stickman
10-26-2002, 08:34 AM
Fred, I used to work in a printing plant. Some of the printing presses use an adhesive backed printing blanket. The blankets are a compressable rubber material. I got some of this blanket material from a friend, cut a small strip and lined the inner bearing race with it. To get the right size bearing, I took my shaft, and a piece of the printing blanket to the auto parts store, and told the counter man what I was wanting to do. He brought out bearings until we found the right size.

Sid_Vicious
10-26-2002, 11:45 AM
Stickman..We did have legendary tip guy(and solid player) who had this setup, and like Spiderman I never studied it to know exactly what it was. Thanks very much, this thing can also be adapted for one piece cues with the right boot, I do remember that. His setup didn't incorporate the bearing idea, just a freestyle, seat of the pants whirling gizmo. Damn easy, and simple as hell..sid

TonyM
10-26-2002, 01:11 PM
Atlas Billiard supplies, Chris Hightower, Unique products inc, and Prather cue parts.

You can use a specially made pin for cue repair, or you can just buy a regular joint pin and spin that. It works fine.

Tony

Sid_Vicious
10-26-2002, 05:22 PM
Tony,,,Spiderman has me to understand that the pins by themselves will wobble too much. I'm not wanting to cut a ferrule, just hone the final shape...is this really as easy as you said???sid

Rod
10-26-2002, 05:40 PM
Sid,
I've used those pins many times with good results. I put my drill in a vise and support the other end with my hand. It is kind of a pain and you do have to be careful. If one is not use to working with their hands in such a manner you could damage a shaft or ferrule. After reading this thread and the ideas its my idea now to build in some support. Or just build a little inexpensive lathe sounds better.

Rip
10-26-2002, 08:13 PM
Sid, using a pin in a hand drill does allow a slight wobble so you wouldn't want to use it for ferrule work. I use the Willards Tipping Machine to face the ferrule, set the tip and trim the tip flush to the ferrule or close to it. Then I pop a pin into my hand drill and screw on the shaft and put the finishing touches on the tip. A vise would be handy for steadying the drill but my wife is willing and she's prettier. No you can't borrow her. Since she's reading this over my shoulder and I just wrote that she's prettier than a vise I wonder if I'll get lucky later?????????hmmmmmmmmmmmm...that IS a compliment isn't it?

Or is it sort of like the old pick up line that a buddy of mine used to use on girls that were uh, a little hefty. He'd saunter up to the ample young lady, look her up and down, wink and then he'd dazzle her with "Hey there good looking...I noticed you don't sweat much for a fat girl". See ya', Rip

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> Tony,,,Spiderman has me to understand that the pins by themselves will wobble too much. I'm not wanting to cut a ferrule, just hone the final shape...is this really as easy as you said???sid <hr></blockquote>

10-26-2002, 10:45 PM
Check this out may give you some ideas.
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/findprod.cfm?&amp;DID=6&amp;sku=2399

heater451
10-27-2002, 11:25 AM
Sears carries a $69.99 drill stand: http://www.sears.com/sr/product/summary/productsummary.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@0411325125.103 5739271@@@@&amp;BV_EngineID=ccidadcgihmfffhcehgcemgdff mdflg.0&amp;vertical=SEARS&amp;fromAuto=YES&amp;bidsite=&amp;pid=0 0925989000

There is also a $39.99 version, with more plastic (see bottom of the page), and the drill can be turned horizontally in it. However, you could probably build a sturdy, custom jig at half the cost.



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