PDA

View Full Version : Help With BIH Cheeze Shots :-(



Sid_Vicious
10-27-2002, 06:40 PM
I desperately need advice on an obvious problem...hosing up a cheeze shot with BIH. Tell me, are there basic fundamentals for this seemingly no brainer? It's criminal the way I can fail on this shot. Here's a shot I missed Saturday.

START(
%BD4U8%CN8O6%DS1U9%Eg6S5%FZ9O4%Ge1H0%Hc9Q8%ID4Q3%P D4X3%WD4R5
%XD3U2
)END

I admit that NOBODY should screw these up but I can, REGULARLY! Do you have a different stroke or is this something to practice to not miss...sid~~~misses far too many of these opportunities

10-27-2002, 07:06 PM
You keep missing the same shot over and over and you're asking if you should practice it? Well gee wiz....I'll have to think about that...:)

Anonymous #47 --- can't wait to read all the posts describing that "different stroke".

9 Ball Girl
10-27-2002, 07:17 PM
I have the same problem when I come across a straight-in combo shot. I usually try to put the CB as close as I can to the OB to close the gap between the two and use a closed hand bridge to prevent a wobbly stroke.

However, without BIH, I can usually make this one. Go figure:

START(
%BH2K4%CX7U0%DS1U9%Eg6S5%FZ9O4%Ge1H0%Hc9Q8%IE3E6%P O0M6%UF3G7
%VG6J5%WJ1L3%XN0M4
)END

PQQLK9
10-27-2002, 07:42 PM
Ok Sid... that's one of the shots that I usually nail. I note the contact point to make the object ball and then concentrate on hitting that point with the first object ball while ignoring the pocket.Remember now...Stay down and Follow through.../ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif good luck.

Mike H
10-27-2002, 08:11 PM
Sid, while I don't have use of the WEI table, here's my suggestion: I line up the contact points on both OB's, and before I swing away, I look for the most "free" way to shoot it, meaning I determine if the 9 is easier to pocket when going rail-first with the first OB, I determine how I can create distance between the two OB's if I miss, and I determine if I can get the CB safe at the same time. Knowing you can do these things make it a little easier to relax and not worry when you shoot BIH 9-ball combos. Also, shooting these shots is worth some practice time, maybe a half-hour every practice session.

Alfie
10-27-2002, 11:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> It's criminal the way I can fail on this shot. <hr></blockquote> What size table were you on? How big were the pockets?

Rod
10-28-2002, 12:30 AM
Sid, Practicing combos is a good idea, it comes in handy. One word about combos, I've never seen one that is a cheese shot unless it's in front of the pocket. They may look simple but are really easy to miss. Don't consider them cheese shots ever, like your finding out. I rarely shoot a combo firm either, the one you had should have been shot fairly slow. If your a little off with to much speed it can just rattle in the pocket. If it was a bar box then it is easier but still can be missed. I'd opt for the run out personally, Ive been bit on combos way to many times.

Sid_Vicious
10-28-2002, 08:13 AM
Rod...I did whack it pretty good, not a soft hit. But I have to say that most of my general competition making what seems like 80% of their combos shoot them hard, just an observation I've made. I don't usually opt for combos unless the table is really a mess somewhere, but I think about anyone would not have passed up the combo I presented on the WEI table.

I will practice these, and try slowing down. Thanks...sid

phil in sofla
10-28-2002, 09:51 AM
Line up on the intervening ball as if it were the cue ball. Once you see that line, position the cue ball to make a center ball hit right on that point, so that you are shooting straight down that line, not cutting the intervening ball. Get the cue ball close to the intervening ball, 3 or 4 inches, and concentrate only on making a full ball, center hit, ignoring the 9 ball entirely.

If you've set this up correctly, and can deliver a full ball stroke, the 9 has to go.

One thing: if the intervening object ball is skidding when it impacts the 9, collision induced throw can cause the 9 to undercut. Ideally, you'd want the object ball rolling naturally, which will minimize the contact induced throw on the 9.

Sid_Vicious
10-28-2002, 11:07 AM
I was backwards in my thinking about the skidding issue. I've gotten a lot of valuable advice from everyone, thanks to everyone...time to put in practice time with these shots. I've never practiced combos,,,don't know why...sid

10-28-2002, 12:29 PM
I think the biggest problem is you are considering them a "cheeze shot"--a shot that can't/shouldn't be missed. Big mistake!

I used to be a ball-in-hand disaster area until I started giving them the same respect and concentration that I would a "tough shot". Bingo, end of problem!

Yours in anonymity,
DLE

10-28-2002, 01:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I desperately need advice on an obvious problem...hosing up a cheeze shot with BIH. Tell me, are there basic fundamentals for this seemingly no brainer? It's criminal the way I can fail on this shot. Here's a shot I missed Saturday.

START(
%BD4U8%CN8O6%DS1U9%Eg6S5%FZ9O4%Ge1H0%Hc9Q8%ID4Q3%P D4X3%WD4R5
%XD3U2
)END

I admit that NOBODY should screw these up but I can, REGULARLY! Do you have a different stroke or is this something to practice to not miss...sid~~~misses far too many of these opportunities

<hr></blockquote>

Don't cheese the 9, just run out. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif


If you MUST cheese the 9, I have a wierd way of doing combo's in which I just mentally turn the first object ball (in this case the 2 ball) into the cueball, and hit it where I need to to make the 9.

But in all honesty, running out is easier than that combo.. er, depending on the table.

another idea: Practice combos during your regular practice sessions, and do NOTHING but combos for about 3 or 4 racks at least.