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View Full Version : bridge length



bluewolf
10-31-2002, 06:17 AM
ww and I watched Effren Reyes in the semi final on ESPN. The next day, ww tried the longer bridge but decided his was already long enough. The next day I got in this space where I was tired of thinking and got drunk stroking the ball. In this place, I really did not care if the balls went in, but more went in than usual. Since I was not thinking,I was was just doing what in essence my body wanted to do, after awhile I noticed that my bridge was much longer. It gave me so much fluidity and looseness that I didnt think of whether I was following through enough, it just happened naturally.

I read in one of Phil Capelle's book that they recommended a 6-8 inch bridge. Mine was much longer but it felt good.

I am just wondering if any of you use a longer bridge and if so what does it do for your game?

bw

10-31-2002, 08:39 AM
Because the bridge is a fulcrum point, the longer the bridge, the more perfectly your stroke must be. A shorter bridge (but not too short 8 to 10 inches) is easier to play with and best for a beginner to learn from the start. Reyes gets away with much of what he does, bridge, stroke and so on, but just because he plays like he does it should not be imitated.

Chris Cass
10-31-2002, 09:00 AM
shorter the bridge, the more control.

longer the bridge, the more vision.

C.C.~~balancing the cue with an 8-10" bridge and that's not written in stone.

10-31-2002, 09:03 AM
Hey anon, do you think Reyes started out playing with a short bridge length? I've heard this advice before that people shouldn't try to imitate Reyes. Why shouldn't they? He happens to be the best player in the world.

Cueless Joey
10-31-2002, 10:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> Hey anon, do you think Reyes started out playing with a short bridge length? I've heard this advice before that people shouldn't try to imitate Reyes. Why shouldn't they? He happens to be the best player in the world. <hr></blockquote>
I have tried and I lose power and accuracy. If you are going to have a bridge as long as Efren's, you better have his stroke too. Efren lets the stick go when he shoots. He also plays with a very heavy cue and a long thin shaft. Efren also has eye to hand coordination that we will never have.
My opinion is, if there is a pro that should be studied and copied, it's Davenport.

10-31-2002, 10:41 AM
I have noticed in my travels that good players often influence players in the rooms where they play. Players such as Jimmy Reid, Danny DiLiberto, Hopkins and more have funky fundamentals. It is not to say what they do is wrong or bad, but for the new player learning the game, there has to be a middle of the road that has proven to work, for them to start with. Earl by the way has been taking a few lessons, (yes lessons), from Fisher on stance. He is becoming convinced he can improve some of his shot making with sort of a snooker stance. I guess there is always something new to learn or try. That is the fun of the game, you can't master it there is always another level for each one of us.

10-31-2002, 10:45 AM
I think 6-8 inches is a little short. Maybe the older generation who played mainly straight pool preferred the shorter bridge. Most players seem to be bridging around 8-10 inches from the cueball these days.

10-31-2002, 11:06 AM
Yes, he lets go of the cue and that takes trust. He trusts the fact that when he lets go he'll get what he's asking for. Other players fall short of emulating him because they don't trust letting go. It's not the hand-eye coordination that makes him superior. It's the trust. Most players need to feel that they're in control and they don't realize how much it holds them back.

Just the opinion of an anon ball banger.

Cueless Joey
10-31-2002, 11:54 AM
You can't actually shoot any straighter than when you let the cue go. It does take a lot of trust and adjusting.
Most shooters here also hold their cues with three fingers. Efren showed me how he really holds his cue with the thumb and index finger. Best advice I ever got. But, rarely do you see shooters hold the cue with one finger and the thumb.
I will spend some more time throwing the stick.

10-31-2002, 12:27 PM
A bona fides pool post from the BW. Wow! Congrats.

If you watch the snooker pros like Hendry, O'Sullivan, Davis, Williams, etc., you will notice bridge lengths from 12-15 inches to well over 2 feet when they bridge off the long rail on power shots. Considering these guys will easily best Efren and Earl when it comes to pure potting, maybe there is something there worth exploring. Maybe our Canadian and European friends can corroborate and expand on this?

10-31-2002, 12:55 PM
The problem is, you would be changing your whole set up to try this. But I know what you are saying though, when you see pros doing something you are tempted to want to try it. Do you think the size of the table and having to reach may be how they developed the habit?

bluewolf
10-31-2002, 02:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Cueless Joey:</font><hr> You can't actually shoot any straighter than when you let the cue go. It does take a lot of trust and adjusting.
Most shooters here also hold their cues with three fingers. Efren showed me how he really holds his cue with the thumb and index finger. Best advice I ever got. But, rarely do you see shooters hold the cue with one finger and the thumb.
I will spend some more time throwing the stick. <hr></blockquote>

the best for me seems to be the cue resting on two fingers, i am not really holding it,in the follow through it is the c doing all the work.by doing it that way, my hand tremors were no longer a factor and i do like the longer bridge too. except for short shots or shots off a rail 10 or so inches in the bridge with the closed bridge barely touching the cue got me the best results so far..that might not be saying much to many here who are experts at pool, i guess that is why i wanted feedback...

even though this feels good to me and keeps me in the moment,if all of you said i was doing this wrong, i would listen.

bw

Mike H
10-31-2002, 06:25 PM
I guess 6-8 inches is the standard recommendation from many instructors, and if it feels comfortable, that's fine. I happen to find it pretty constrictive and keep mine at anywhere from 10-16 inches. To me, it feels smooth, fluid, and provides the result I want more consistently than a short bridge. I think too many players ignore comfort at the table, and look at being rigid in stance, posture, and bridge as their ally. But look at it like this: if you're rigid, there must be added tension in your muscles. If your muscles are more tense than necessary, you are more likely to have some unwanted movement trying to release this tension before your shot is finished. If you're more comfortable with a slightly longer bridge (meaning 8-12 inches), spend time working with it, but don't regard it as something you absolutely must do until you've decided what you're comfortable with in the long run.

Mike H~~~giving two cents, prepared to get change LOL

bigbro6060
10-31-2002, 09:45 PM
No offence to Alison, but if were a top Pool player and wanted to learn about the Snooker stance, i'd seek out Steve Davis or Stephen hendry !

bluewolf
11-01-2002, 04:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Mike H:</font><hr> I guess 6-8 inches is the standard recommendation from many instructors, and if it feels comfortable, that's fine. I happen to find it pretty constrictive and keep mine at anywhere from 10-16 inches. To me, it feels smooth, fluid, and provides the result I want more consistently than a short bridge. I think too many players ignore comfort at the table, and look at being rigid in stance, posture, and bridge as their ally. But look at it like this: if you're rigid, there must be added tension in your muscles. If your muscles are more tense than necessary, you are more likely to have some unwanted movement trying to release this tension before your shot is finished. If you're more comfortable with a slightly longer bridge (meaning 8-12 inches), spend time working with it, but don't regard it as something you absolutely must do until you've decided what you're comfortable with in the long run.

Mike H~~~giving two cents, prepared to get change LOL <hr></blockquote>

great. my average would be ten,when i can stretch out on a shot like 13-14, but also use shorter ones if the space is limited.when i went to the longer bridge and one finger with cue resting on it or two fingers, it takes all of the muscle out of the game .

thanks

bw