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DiabloViejo
04-29-2013, 03:11 PM
Remembering 1960s Afghanistan, the photographs of Bill Podlich

Posted Jan 28, 2013

In 1967, Dr. William Podlich took a two-year leave of absence from teaching at Arizona State University and began a stint with UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) to teach in the Higher Teachers College in Kabul, Afghanistan, where he served as the “Expert on Principles of Education.” His wife Margaret and two daughters, Peg and Jan, came with him. Then teenagers, the Podlich sisters attended high school at the American International School of Kabul, which catered to the children of American and other foreigners living and working in the country.

Outside of higher education, Dr. Podlich was a prolific amateur photographer and he documented his family’s experience and daily life in Kabul, rendering frame after frame of a serene, idyllic Afghanistan. Only about a decade before the 1979 Soviet invasion, Dr. Podlich and his family experienced a thriving, modernizing country. These images, taken from 1967-68, show a stark contrast to the war torn scenes associated with Afghanistan today.

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2013/01/28/podlich-afghanistan-1960s-photos/5846/

cushioncrawler
04-29-2013, 04:42 PM
Remembering 2020's USA, the photographs of Dr Podlich

Posted Jan 28, 2063

In 2020, Dr. Podlich took a two-year leave of absence from teaching at Canberra University and began a stint with UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) to teach in the Higher Teachers College in Washington, USA, where he served as the “Expert on Principles of Education.” His wife came with him. Outside of higher education, Dr. Podlich was a prolific amateur photographer and he documented his family’s experience and daily life in Washington, rendering frame after frame of a serene, idyllic USA. Dr. Podlich and his family experienced a thriving modern country. These images, taken from 2020-22, show a stark contrast to the war torn scenes associated with the USA today.