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View Full Version : Joe Biden doesn't trust a spying President and VP



Eightandout
06-15-2013, 08:49 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgu1GBSpyho

My how times have changed...

Eightandout
06-15-2013, 08:52 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Rdi_RNRpdk

Wonder what Obama thinks now...

WV Slim Shady
06-15-2013, 09:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgu1GBSpyho

My how times have changed...

Joe Biden was talking about Bush and not Obama. Presdent obama needs to watch these tea partyers and republicins probly more then he does now. Bush was spying on good hard working demicrats. Obama is trying to make republicin crimnals and drug addicts pay what they owe. If you can afford a maid you can afford a little more tax. If you buy a new car just cause te warrntee runned out you an afford some more tax. If you can afford a huge boat you can afford more tax.

Soflasnapper
06-15-2013, 07:46 PM
It's funny how the perspectives changed by tribal allegiances.

Dems against Bush/Cheney's programs tend to now support the same programs because of the (D) president they support.

Republicans always defending the B/C programs now oppose them because of the (D) president they oppose.

To be sure, there are actual leftists/libertarians/civil rights activists mainly from the leaning (D) side that NOW oppose the (D) president-- meaning they are consistent as to their position on this topic even with the different tribe's leader in charge. (Cf: Glenn Greenwald and others-- the ACLU has filed a lawsuit, etc.)

Also, and to be entirely fair, there are some conservatives and (R) leaners that support the governmental need (they say) to do this kind of surveillance even with the (D) president.

Hypocrisy and accusations of that are of some interest but of a secondary importance. The actual issue is what is the correct position, whether it was taken before or not.

Frankly, I am HAPPY the right has now (mainly) figured out such invasions of privacy are generally bad and generally should be illegal, even if it took a (D) president for them to figure this out.

Gayle in MD
06-16-2013, 02:17 PM
It's funny how the perspectives changed by tribal allegiances.

Dems against Bush/Cheney's programs tend to now support the same programs because of the (D) president they support.

Republicans always defending the B/C programs now oppose them because of the (D) president they oppose.

To be sure, there are actual leftists/libertarians/civil rights activists mainly from the leaning (D) side that NOW oppose the (D) president-- meaning they are consistent as to their position on this topic even with the different tribe's leader in charge. (Cf: Glenn Greenwald and others-- the ACLU has filed a lawsuit, etc.)

Also, and to be entirely fair, there are some conservatives and (R) leaners that support the governmental need (they say) to do this kind of surveillance even with the (D) president.

Hypocrisy and accusations of that are of some interest but of a secondary importance. The actual issue is what is the correct position, whether it was taken before or not.

Frankly, I am HAPPY the right has now (mainly) figured out such invasions of privacy are generally bad and generally should be illegal, even if it took a (D) president for them to figure this out.
Is there anny proof that President Obama broke the FISA laws, as Bush did?

My understanding is that he has informed the appropriate Congressional Oversight, unlike Bush et al.

Also, that no names are linked to the numbers being monitored, unless and until enough red flags are accumulated, is that not correct?

Bush actually sent his goons, among them Gonzales, to the hospital, remember, (?) to pressure then Attorney General Ashcroft who was possibly near death, to give them the go-ahead to continue to break the FISA law, and cntinue their warrantless wire tapping, and that was after the acting Attorney General, Comey, had already turned them down with Ashcroft's approval.

So far as I know, President Obama hasn't broken any laws.

Feel free to correct me if I am wrong, but IMPO, there has been a vast difference between the way our current President is handling these technological methods for tracking both phone numbers, and web site visits, IOW, all just numbers, with no names linked to them, but with links to foreigners, until or unless red flags appear. At that time, the FISA Court must be involved, and there has been congressional oversight all through the program.