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View Full Version : Adapting to play on Cr*p Tables and bad Cues



bigbro6060
11-04-2002, 10:15 PM
How do u guys adapt to play on really bad tables and sometimes with really really bad house cues ?

Since i've got my new own table, i find my tolerance to be very low with subpar tables and/or equipment.

Nothing pisses me off more than miscuing a draw shot with a cr*p house cue with a tip which looks like Big Bertha sat on it and then having some jokers laugh at my miscue (BTW i NEVER miscue with my own cue with draw shots, i mean never).

I also get frustrated that the bad equipment limits my shots so much, if you can't put spin on the ball easily, you can't play position very well.

a lot of those very average pub bashers always go "well if your a good player, you should be able to play on any table and with any cue ". Whilst i see a small piece of merit in this statement i firmly believe than bad tables and bad equipment is the ultimate equalizer and brings good players back to the pack.

It would be like making Peter Sampras play tennis with a racquet with a broken string, you'd take away his power and spin arsenal of shots.

I've read jeanette lee's book and she says you shouldn't grumble or blame the equipment ever, just smile and make your shots. I'm trying to do this but find it hard.

any help out there for me ?

11-04-2002, 10:50 PM
You would never make it on the road. Part of the fun of the game is all the different equipment. Who wants to play in a laboratory. You should have your own cue though, but as far as the rest, who cares, just play.

stickman
11-04-2002, 11:38 PM
I never play with a house cue, so that's not anything I can address. I do play on some pretty sub par tables though. Speed, roll off, cueballs that play like mudballs are all things that require adjustment. Not easy, I grant you, but they are the same conditions for the other player as well. A lessor player that is accustomed to the conditions can give you a tough match, if not beat you sometimes. I like to use a lot of draw, and on some tables I have to change my game to use follow instead. If you don't adapt, you don't win usually. You just have to read the table conditions and adjust accordingly. One table that I play on has a very fast short rail on the headstring end. The other end is slow. It is a disadvantage to anyone that doesn't know the table, but I've noticed really good players adapt quickly.

Wally_in_Cincy
11-05-2002, 07:43 AM
If you must play with a house cue find the one with the best tip rather than the straightest one. Carry a tip scuffer, a Cue Cube for instance, with you so you can rough the tip so it will hold chalk. Or buy a cheap sneaky pete to carry around.

If the table's not level there's not much you can do, just don't slow-roll any shots.

Rich R.
11-05-2002, 08:00 AM
You have the ability to control the quality of the cue you use. Preferably take your own. If that is not possible, take the time to look for the best you can find in the room.
The quality of the table and balls is a little harder to control, but remember, your opponent is playing on the same table with the same balls. Within the first fifteen minutes, or sooner, you should know what the table and the balls will allow you to do. You have to adapt.
I strongly recommend that you support the owners that maintain their equipment and stay away from the rooms that don't, if that is possible. A few cents less for table time is not necessarily a bargain.
Rich R.

Chris Cass
11-05-2002, 08:05 AM
I agree here with you Wally. If you don't have a sneaky pete of your own you grab the best house cue you can find. If the thing is warped then, point the warp down before shooting. Never slow roll anything, don't slam it either. Stay about 4 mph.

The better players will separate themselves from the pack. You'll have to stay more in a quarter radious(sp) of the cb ball when hitting it. Forget, about drawing your rock and making anything with tons of spin. Try to use follow more. Half the time it's the cb that's the real problem.

Regards,

C.C.

Kato
11-05-2002, 08:36 AM
Every now and again I will go to the back of the room with the worst old set of balls on the worst table and with the worst lighting and hit balls. Sorry bro, it's part of pool. If you're going to be a decent player (not saying you aren't) you're going to have to play on everything. Get yourself a Sneaky Pete, cheap case, a couple of gizmos and get out to the pubs where grass grows on the cloth and hit 'em.

Kato

11-05-2002, 09:20 AM
I often play with house cues; helps keep me on my toes. Things are a little better around here now but not that long ago there were some really crummy tables. One place had a table where all the balls would roll to one corner. Another place had an ancient table with a foot rail so bad that nothing would rebound off of it and would actually pop balls into the air if you hit it hard enough. Sure, those weren't my first choices of places to play, but we'd still play there occasionally just for yuks. You've gotta learn to work with what you've got and play accordingly. If you can't find a cue with a decent tip any kind of real spin is out. Take the opportunity to work with natural angles and speed control or use follow. If there's a dead rail avoid it, or even use it to your advantage. /ccboard/images/icons/wink.gif
When picking a house cue the first thing to look for is a decent tip. After that make sure the cue isn't broken or have any loose parts, then check to see if it's straight. One sees people all the time check for a straight cue and nothing else when it's really one of the least important requirements. It's already been said; the other player has to deal with the same problems you do, the one who can adapt is the one who will win.

"Keep that cue-stick in the trunk... you’ll play with a house cue... go in there with that thing and no one will come near you with a nickel!" /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
11-05-2002, 09:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Chris Cass:</font><hr> I agree here with you Wally. If you don't have a sneaky pete of your own you grab the best house cue you can find. If the thing is warped then, point the warp down before shooting. Never slow roll anything, don't slam it either. Stay about 4 mph.

The better players will separate themselves from the pack. You'll have to stay more in a quarter radious(sp) of the cb ball when hitting it. Forget, about drawing your rock and making anything with tons of spin. Try to use follow more. Half the time it's the cb that's the real problem.

Regards,

C.C. <hr></blockquote>

We played APA league last Monday in an old bowling alley. The table was ok but the balls were very old, very dirty, and very heavy. The cb weighed about as much as an anvil /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif. A draw stroke that would typically draw the length of the table brought it back about a foot /ccboard/images/icons/tongue.gif. We were laughing our butts off at each other trying to draw the ball.