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View Full Version : Straight pool: The way to get better.



11-07-2002, 06:48 AM
I forgot about straight pool, and I think it's a pretty good game to play by yourself to practice. Many things the game can teach you that are pretty important IMO..

I was playing tonight, and learned a new shot that I'll probably never use again, but if it, or a variant of it comes up, I'll know what to do.. here it is:

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I didn't have a break shot yet, and the 7 was in the middle of the rack, so I concentrated on making the 11 and getting position on the 7, expecting to play for a off-rail breakshot, but the 15 went to a perfect spot to float off the 7 for a good angle on the 15 for a break shot. Yay! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

This straight pool rules, IMO. If I play it for 2 hours I learn more about the cueball than a week of playing 9-ball or 8-ball. I went down to the bar after playing tonight and ran out 3 racks off the bat, and could've done more but I felt bad for the bar patrons. They couldn't believe the amount of control I had over the cueball.

and it's pretty nice having a table at home. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

PQQLK9
11-07-2002, 06:53 AM
Good for u Kid...but if u wanna really learn how to control the rock...play some 1 Pocket /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

11-07-2002, 07:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: PQQLK9:</font><hr> Good for u Kid...but if u wanna really learn how to control the rock...play some 1 Pocket /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif <hr></blockquote>

One pocket is my favorite game in the world, but it's difficult to play by yourself. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif Since noone around here really plays anything but 8-ball, and most of them don't want to play me anymore (har har har) I am usually playing by myself.

I think that heaven is a place where the tables only have 2 pockets. /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

eg8r
11-07-2002, 08:26 AM
Hello Seattle Kid,

When my grandfather took me the first time to the pool hall, he taught me the basics. Once I had that down, he started teaching me Straight Pool. I never even played 8ball until I got to high school. I noticed in college that my consistency of pocketing balls was slowly going down. I would rattle the shots and lose confidence. I then went away one summer and I frequented a pool hall there daily. All morning the guy that ran the place would have me shoot drill shots and such without playing any games. Then in the afternoon, I would play straight pool with one of the guys in the hall. My shot making ability in the bottom 4 pockets increased dramatically (don't play as many shots down table in straight pool). The big problem with this, was my 9ball game did not suffer, but did not look any better. When I was playing straight pool I very rarely would play any long shots or aggressive shots like you see in 9ball.

eg8r &lt;~~~I like 9ball but straight pool is my favorite. I am not very good at it and my high run is only 23 balls.

11-07-2002, 12:41 PM
It's not necessarily how many you run, eg8r, it's how you run them. If you're observing all the rules of thumb (clear paths to the corner pockets, take balls off the rail early in your sequence, leave one ball on the bottom rail until all the rest are open, etc.), the number of balls you run will take care of itself. The thing to do is learn to play CORRECTLY first. George Fels

eg8r
11-07-2002, 01:01 PM
Thank you. Too bad nobody here in Fort Worth plays the game. Yes I know not to worry about the number ran, but it seems like when I get near that number, all hell breaks loose. One problem I have is when I start to get near the end of the rack, if there is no break ball, I have no idea what to do given the layout to move a ball over to make a break ball. Another problem is noticing the break ball early enough to make sure I don't shoot it in. ha ha

The only thing that I do not like about Billy Weirs except for no food is, tthere are no counters anywhere. The Diamond Pros are beautiful tables, I wish there were some sort of counter in the table to keep track of the score.

eg8r

PQQLK9
11-07-2002, 01:08 PM
Diamond makes matching counters that are suitable for wall mounting....that's what they use at Mothers in Charlotte. Get ol' Billy Boy to spring for some /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

eg8r
11-07-2002, 01:10 PM
That sounds like a wonderful idea. Maybe we could move one of Toby's pictures and put up a counter. The man has spent a fortune in this pool hall, I am sure he could swing a little more for the counter.

I will ask rackmup to ask, they are all buddies. lol

eg8r

Rich R.
11-07-2002, 01:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: PQQLK9:</font><hr> Diamond makes matching counters that are suitable for wall mounting....that's what they use at Mothers in Charlotte. Get ol' Billy Boy to spring for some /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif <hr></blockquote>
Where can I find these counters? I check the Diamond website and they are not shown.
Rich R.~~~doesn't have a Diamond table, but looking for counters.

Wally_in_Cincy
11-07-2002, 01:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> It's not necessarily how many you run, eg8r, it's how you run them. If you're observing all the rules of thumb (clear paths to the corner pockets, take balls off the rail early in your sequence, leave one ball on the bottom rail until all the rest are open, etc.), the number of balls you run will take care of itself. The thing to do is learn to play CORRECTLY first. George Fels <hr></blockquote>

Thanks for remnding me it's time to re-read "Advanced Pool" and watch Jim Rempe's "How to Run 100 Balls" again. Tom in Cincy better watch out /ccboard/images/icons/laugh.gif

11-07-2002, 06:22 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: eg8r:</font><hr> Hello Seattle Kid,

When my grandfather took me the first time to the pool hall, he taught me the basics. Once I had that down, he started teaching me Straight Pool. I never even played 8ball until I got to high school. I noticed in college that my consistency of pocketing balls was slowly going down. I would rattle the shots and lose confidence. I then went away one summer and I frequented a pool hall there daily. All morning the guy that ran the place would have me shoot drill shots and such without playing any games. Then in the afternoon, I would play straight pool with one of the guys in the hall. My shot making ability in the bottom 4 pockets increased dramatically (don't play as many shots down table in straight pool). The big problem with this, was my 9ball game did not suffer, but did not look any better. When I was playing straight pool I very rarely would play any long shots or aggressive shots like you see in 9ball.

eg8r &lt;~~~I like 9ball but straight pool is my favorite. I am not very good at it and my high run is only 23 balls.

<hr></blockquote>

Well, chances are, the more you play, you might not run MORE than 23 balls for a while, but you'll gradually notice that you run more at a time. I haven't played for a while, but after a bit I could see patterns that work, and which balls to take off the table. Like George Fels says, it's HOW you play, not how many your high run is.

My high run is only 35 (granted, I play on an 8' table with 4 and 1/4" pockets, not even big enough to fit two balls) but if you can consistently get the rack broken apart, and run all the balls, you're doing pretty well. You can run 14's and win tournaments.

11-07-2002, 07:09 PM
Kid,

Anybody who recognizes the advantages of straight pool is okay in my book. It's what I grew up watching and is still my first love.

Yes, 9-ball is exciting, but straight pool requires thoughtfulness, control and, in my opinion, a deeper aesthetic sense when played at its top level. Of the players living today, I love to watch the patterns of the best, men like Mike Zuglan and Mike Sigel. I love it when they just pick away at the stack, elegantly moving just what they need to to continue their run. If 9-ball is the Mick Jagger of pool, straight is definitely its Mozart.

All the best,
Bob

dddd
11-08-2002, 12:07 AM
play by yourself is quite possible in 1 pocket. i see others and i play by myself enough.
rack the balls, break them up with a head ball hit not too hard but loosen something up and provide yourself some balls to shoot. take ball in hand run as many as you can.
there are other things to do
line them up in a row and bank each to pocket-test yourself here

set up the pack put a ball on the other side near the rail,
and q ball on opposite side play to kick, and-test yourself with speed and quality of contact.

Misel
11-08-2002, 04:07 AM
Hi Bob,
My favorite straight pool player is Willie Mosconi and the one that is still alive is Mike Sigel.I love to watch Sigel,s cue ball control.

Misel

CarolNYC
11-08-2002, 05:22 AM
Patterns,clusters,troubleballs,keyballs,breakshots ,intentional fouls-and best of all,strategy!Gotta love it!
Way to go!:)
Carol

Wally_in_Cincy
11-08-2002, 07:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Seattle-kid:</font><hr> You can run 14's and win tournaments. <hr></blockquote>

You'd have to find a tournament first LOL.

Better save your pennies for a trip to NYC.

Fred Agnir
11-08-2002, 08:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Seattle-kid:</font><hr> I forgot about straight pool, and I think it's a pretty good game to play by yourself to practice. Many things the game can teach you that are pretty important IMO..<hr></blockquote>
It's a good time to throw in a wake-up post, given it's almost the weekend.

Straight pool, unfortunately, is pretty much dead as a top game. Sure, there's the 14.1 league in NYC, and maybe Cincy. But the fact is that if you go to your average pool hall, nobody is playing straight pool. That means that the average player, especially the "newer" player who has taken up pool only in the last 20 years really has no concept of what good or bad straight pool is.

I've met people on my travels tell me about their romantic straight pool sessions, and that their high run is blahdidblah. And then, when we play, it's obvious that although they can make shots, and get a rack down, they really don't have the grasp of what straight pool is about. Don't get me wrong, these are pretty damned good players, but they're playing something different and missing some basic concepts.

That's my take. The game of straight pool if alive in your area most likely has little resemblence to the game of old. If there isn't an older player showing the ins-and-outs to the new players, then that information is nothing but a storied romance.

In my game, it's influenced by straight pool as that's what was being played at my pool hall growing up in Massachusetts. But nobody plays it anymore, and whether or not I practice it or play with some other players, the wealth of information available in my youth is simply not there anymore. There's nobody there to tell me where my pattern went awry. And all I really have is memories.

Fred

11-08-2002, 08:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: fightingbob:</font><hr> Kid,

Anybody who recognizes the advantages of straight pool is okay in my book. It's what I grew up watching and is still my first love.

Yes, 9-ball is exciting, but straight pool requires thoughtfulness, control and, in my opinion, a deeper aesthetic sense when played at its top level. Of the players living today, I love to watch the patterns of the best, men like Mike Zuglan and Mike Sigel. I love it when they just pick away at the stack, elegantly moving just what they need to to continue their run. If 9-ball is the Mick Jagger of pool, straight is definitely its Mozart.

All the best,
Bob <hr></blockquote>

Well, thank you Bob. I agree, Mike Zuglan is one of the all time bests. I have a tape of him doing a 148 ball run on Ray Martin, and it's cool to watch such a good run, but to end a run at 148 instead of 150 would hurt! /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

I also have Jim Rempe's "how to run 100 balls" and I highly recommend that. He has a couple tips in the video that are worth much more than the price of the tape, IMO.

I Just wish I'd started playing pool when straight pool was around, I think I'd be twice the shotmaker that I am today.

Regards, and thanks for the reply.

Fred Agnir
11-08-2002, 08:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Seattle-kid:</font><hr> I Just wish I'd started playing pool when straight pool was around, I think I'd be twice the shotmaker that I am today. <hr></blockquote>
Everyone is different, but you're describing me, and I'll tell you right now that straight pool did not make me a better shotmaker. Straight pool helped in other areas like cluster analysis, runout patterns (especially for 8-ball), cueball patterns, and small table position. 9-ball, however, is what added the shotmaking to my game.

Fred

Wally_in_Cincy
11-08-2002, 10:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr>
Everyone is different, but you're describing me, and I'll tell you right now that straight pool did not make me a better shotmaker. Straight pool helped in other areas like cluster analysis, runout patterns (especially for 8-ball), cueball patterns, and small table position. 9-ball, however, is what added the shotmaking to my game.

Fred <hr></blockquote>

I agree with that 80%

Straight pool helps you learn combos and throwing frozen caroms and combos. Plus the sheer quantity of shots taken makes for good practice. Other than that I agree.
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> If there isn't an older player showing the ins-and-outs to the new players, then that information is nothing but a storied romance.

In my game, it's influenced by straight pool as that's what was being played at my pool hall growing up in Massachusetts. But nobody plays it anymore, and whether or not I practice it or play with some other players, the wealth of information available in my youth is simply not there anymore. There's nobody there to tell me where my pattern went awry. And all I really have is memories.

Fred
<hr></blockquote>


We are fortunate around here to have a handful of veterans to teach some of the finer points.

I'm sure you have these videos but for others who may be reading this I recommend Jim Rempe's "How to Run 100 Balls" and Mike Sigel's "Perfect Pool".

11-08-2002, 05:12 PM
Straight pool like one pocket may have evolved a little due to today's styles of play. I remember when one pocket was all safety and you never saw anyone take a chance. The new players today play a very aggressive game of one pocket where one mistake will lose the game. I was at a tournament and a young Miz was playing Crane. Crane put him up table on a safety and Miz shot the shot and ran out, (over a hundred). As soon as it was over Crane jumped up telling Miz he would never be a player playing like that, he was not supposed to have shot the shot. It may not have been the right shot to Crane, but it was to Miz. Getting back to one pocket, I don't think many of the old champs could beat the new crop of talented aggressive players today. They have brought the game to a new level. I remember sitting with Joey Spath before he died. A fan came up and said "You would rob all these guys if you were playing," Joey smiled, but after the guy left said to me, "None of the old timers would beat today's players." Take it for what it worth.

L.S. Dennis
01-19-2003, 01:07 AM
I'm glad to see that in this world of 9-ball and one pocket someone still wants to learn this game. Here on the west coast it's non existent! It was the first game I ever learned to play and to this day it is still my favorite.

The previous post is correct, Jim Rempe has 2 great accustat tape on staight pool. One is called "How to run a rack of balls" and the other is "how to run 100 balls" They're both great.

Rod
01-19-2003, 02:36 AM
[ QUOTE ]
IMO. If I play it for 2 hours I learn more about the cueball than a week of playing 9-ball or 8-ball. <hr /></blockquote>

SK, that's what it's all about c/b control. I happen to agree with you. If it works for you, and it should, keep on stroking.

landshark1002000
01-19-2003, 03:17 PM
Mr. Fels,
Could you remind us about how to place a "value" on the balls during a run? I can't recall which of your book's it's in. These values help us to establish ball order. --Was this an original idea (describing it this way) or something that's been around for awhile?
Thanks for your post.

Wally_in_Cincy
01-20-2003, 07:25 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote L.S. Dennis:</font><hr> I'm glad to see that in this world of 9-ball and one pocket someone still wants to learn this game. Here on the west coast it's non existent! It was the first game I ever learned to play and to this day it is still my favorite.

The previous post is correct, Jim Rempe has 2 great accustat tape on staight pool. One is called "How to run a rack of balls" and the other is "how to run 100 balls" They're both great. <hr /></blockquote>

Coincidentally I watched both of those last night. After watching the horrendous "Winning 8-ball by Bobby Burnett" last week I felt like I needed to watch a tape of someone who actually can play /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif and Jim Rempe plays straight pool as smooth as warm butter. Oh yeah...

01-20-2003, 09:38 AM
hello all, first time member,

Ive had trouble finding the real rules for straight pool. I recently bought "The Hustler" with paul newman, and they played straight pool can anyone provide a link.

thx

01-20-2003, 09:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote NostalgicLime:</font><hr> hello all, first time member,

Ive had trouble finding the real rules for straight pool. I recently bought "The Hustler" with paul newman, and they played straight pool can anyone provide a link.

thx <hr /></blockquote>Here's the standard BCA rules:

http://www.bca-pool.com/play/tournaments/rules/rls_141.shtml