PDA

View Full Version : The Secret of the Game? What do you guys think?



11-11-2002, 09:04 AM
For the past few weeks I have seen many post about what people thinks makes great players. One CCB poster believe that Efren Reyes' stroke is a sign of his trust in himself. Another believes that a few quality hours a day will get a person to the next level. Also, some posters believe understanding the complicated physics behind the game will help a player play flawlessly. My personal belief is that all the guys that are playing pool for a living have made more balls than me, and in general, put in more table time. Even though Corey Deuel is a year younger than me, I would bet that he has made a couple million more balls than me. I believe that you can get more out of your practice time by knowing some tricks to the trade or you can improve your game by having great playing technique, but that no one can turely reach the next level without putting in an incredible amount of table time and practice.
I guess what I am getting at is; I believe they are a few naturals at ever endeavor, but that the majority has to really work at there game and that if any of us (CCB posters and pool fanatics) wanted to be a pro we would have to quit our jobs and say goodbye to our family and start putting in eight or ten hours a day. I really do not know a pro pool player that does not have a few years in there development that they were not in pretty much constant practice.

visit www.nineballking.com (http://www.nineballking.com)

Kevin Whitt

11-11-2002, 09:36 AM
I agree, Very few pros in any sport are natural talents, but come to the sport either because a father played or some series of circumstances. Once hooked on the sport they put in what ever it takes to succeed. In fact in almost any walk of life, the top people are the ones willing to do what it took. Most aren't willing and what they think is desire, is really wishful thinking. They are the ones that say "I am starting first thing tomorrow," and tomorrow never comes. This is no a bad thing though. Not many are meant to be the workaholics it takes. I know I am not and have a happy life. To be honest, I have a talent for pool and the game comes very easy to me, always has, but I also have other interests. Pool is just another thing I do, it's fun, but not my life.

stickman
11-11-2002, 09:44 AM
I suspect that you're right about this. I was once a very good tournament archer. I never competed nationally, but competed regionally. (Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri.) I got to know the winners, and became good friends with many of them. I found that nearly all of them practiced a minimum of 2-4 hours daily. It wasn't until I was willing to put in this sort of practice that I was able to compete and win sometimes. Once I found other things more important in my life, and gave up the strict practice schedule, I was no longer able to be competitive. I suspect that the same is true of pool.

Fred Agnir
11-11-2002, 09:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Nineball_King:</font><hr> Also, some posters believe understanding the complicated physics behind the game will help a player play flawlessly. <hr></blockquote>
I doubt there is one sane person out there that believes this. That's either poor reading comprehension or a strawman. Choose your poison.

IMO, there are at least two talents needed to become a professional at any endeavor. Talent to play and talent to improve. Add in time and a crazy desire, and voila, professional caliber here we come. Miss one of these, and no pro for you. Unforturnately, the majority of us have none of the above.

Fred

bluewolf
11-11-2002, 11:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Fred Agnir:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote: Nineball_King:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt; Also, some posters believe understanding the complicated physics behind the game will help a player play flawlessly. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;
I doubt there is one sane person out there that believes this. That's either poor reading comprehension or a strawman. Choose your poison.

IMO, there are at least two talents needed to become a professional at any endeavor. Talent to play and talent to improve. Add in time and a crazy desire, and voila, professional caliber here we come. Miss one of these, and no pro for you. Unforturnately, the majority of us have none of the above.

Fred

<hr></blockquote>

In my opinion, other than time on the table and sound fundamentals, it depends on the person and how their brain works.

Even though I am slightly right brained, I grew up in a family where left brained stuff was more valued (ie-logic,math, attention to detail etc) So I tried my hardest to be left brained.

In pool, there are many techniques imo which require left brained function. The right brain sees angles, shadows and all that spatial stuff, as well as being creative. IMO, it is the right brain which allows the pool player to see the whole run of the rack in a single glance.

Because of the way I grew up, I believe that my biggest challenge is that my left brain tries to be dominant and interferes with my right brain. This requires discipline, but the challenge that awaits me is to completely surrender all my best thinking to my right brain so that I can use the knowlege that my left brain has taught me (without thinking about it) and play by insight and feel.

bw

"the road is long and steep, but I see the light ahead"

11-11-2002, 11:45 AM
In the words of Charlie Brown "AGGGGGRRRRRRRRRRRR"!!!!!!! Left, right, left, right "AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH"!!!!!!!!

bluewolf
11-11-2002, 11:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Anonymous:</font><hr> In the words of Charlie Brown "AGGGGGRRRRRRRRRRRR"!!!!!!! Left, right, left, right "AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH"!!!!!!!! <hr></blockquote>

ROFL..

eg8r
11-11-2002, 12:05 PM
bw,

I don't think your biggest challenge is the left/right brain problem. Your biggest challenge is thinking too much. Just get up there and shoot sometimes and see what happens.

eg8r

bluewolf
11-11-2002, 12:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: eg8r:</font><hr> bw,

I don't think your biggest challenge is the left/right brain problem. Your biggest challenge is thinking too much. Just get up there and shoot sometimes and see what happens.

eg8r <hr></blockquote>

a good point. i shoot better when i am sick because i cannot think very well /ccboard/images/icons/smile.gif

maybe that is why all those balls went in. i still have the 'bug' that is going around.

bw

phil in sofla
11-11-2002, 06:59 PM
I'd say putting the time in on the table is absolutely necessary, but not sufficient.

I see people who play at some plateaued speed, well below pro or even A level, but put in a lot of time, doing the same things and getting the same (mediocre) result.

Putting in a ton of time WILL get you a fair ways, no doubt, but look at the 'also rans' even in the pro ranks.

I went to the seniors tour event at Mizerak's on Friday night, and got to sit behind Buddy Hall and Nick Varner, who were waiting their match, and commenting on Howard Vickery's game, who was playing Claude, the eventual winner. Although Vickery's doing well in the senior tour, the point leader right now, one of the Hall of Famers commented, 'I always thought he had a very solid game. I wonder why he didn't cash more and get a few titles.' I doubt that the reason was that Vickery hasn't hit a million balls, since I'd bet he has.

bluewolf
11-11-2002, 08:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> I'd say putting the time in on the table is absolutely necessary, but not sufficient.

I see people who play at some plateaued speed, well below pro or even A level, but put in a lot of time, doing the same things and getting the same (mediocre) result.

Putting in a ton of time WILL get you a fair ways, no doubt, but look at the 'also rans' even in the pro ranks.

I went to the seniors tour event at Mizerak's on Friday night, and got to sit behind Buddy Hall and Nick Varner, who were waiting their match, and commenting on Howard Vickery's game, who was playing Claude, the eventual winner. Although Vickery's doing well in the senior tour, the point leader right now, one of the Hall of Famers commented, 'I always thought he had a very solid game. I wonder why he didn't cash more and get a few titles.' I doubt that the reason was that Vickery hasn't hit a million balls, since I'd bet he has. <hr /></blockquote>

I am now in my fourth month of playing pool seriously.For three of those months,we had my 4x8 in our living room and I have played every day. I do drills, fire in balls an play about 3 games with ww. Playing with someone better helps me to see if I am improving.

When I am not improving, I start looking at why. I had to adjust my stroke because it was going back a little crooked on the back swing. I am having to learn to not worry about whether the balls are going in but visualize them in the pocket and after looking at the angle, just get up and do my stroke and follow through. I have lengthened my bridge and lightened my grip on the cue. I have made a few other adjustments but I did them one at a time to see if it would help my game. After all of that, I am seeing a little improvement in my pocketing of balls.

WW commented he had to find a way for me to improve fast. I said 'what is wrong with slow improvement?'. I am just estatic that my hard work and determination is starting to pay off.

Some of us advance quicker than others. I think it only adds to frustration to focus on advancements of others. I have accepted that I will need practice and time on the table. I am feeling good and excitement for the small improvements.

All of that to say that I think one key is to be patient and realize I am not going to be in a year where it took others to get to in twenty years. I am learning to enjoy the feeling of the stroke in my hands and the sounds of the balls when they go into the pocket.

bw

bigbro6060
11-12-2002, 01:18 AM
Bluewolf mate, i am like you in that i haven't been playing long at all

From my experience with other sports which i have practiced/played and mastered to varying degrees (namely Running, Tennis and Taekwondo, just for the record, my 10K PB is 34mins 23 sec, i've played A grade pennants in Tennis and i've got a black belt in TKD ), there is always the Law of diminishing returns. E.g. with Running i got to running 10K in 37 mins fairly easily but to get below 35 mins took a year of regimented training, track workouts, hill workouts, all kinds of different training, recording paces and heart rates etc etc.

The same definitely applies to Pool. I see many people who get decent at potting balls in Pool and think they are a bit of alright. To get to the next level of mastering the cueball and the rest of the game takes considerably longer and you have to work much harder for these returns. Not only that, when learning cue ball control, i'm sure there are/will be/have been matches which you have/will lost/lose to a pub hack who just pots balls, because you are playing position and you make a few bad shots and get snookered etc These experiences are somewhat humiliating because you know you are much further along the road of Pool mastery than the chump who just beat you but in the short term, there will be these setbacks

There are so many aspects of the game that i have yet to learn and i am looking forward to the journey ahead, but don't think your improvement will continue on a linear line. As you get better, improvement is slower and requires more work for less gains

bluewolf
11-12-2002, 04:02 AM
your post sounds like what is happening to me. reason? I think I can play safe far better than I can pocket balls. But it is hard to play safe with only one ball and the eight on the table.When playing ww, it generally comes down to that one ball because I have been safing him until i got my easy shots, but 90% of the time, he wins because he can make more banks and hard cut shots.

bw

Popcorn
11-12-2002, 04:38 AM
He may be beating you due to your safety play. If you are playing safe and passing up opportunities to score, you may lose all the same, it will just take a little longer. Without knowing your level of play, waiting to win off of your opponents mistakes, won't beat a good player. Playing to much safe is not the equalizer it may seem. In fact, to a good player, playing someone that is afraid to shoot is a pleasure. They put very little pressure on you. They believe they do with all the safety play, but they really don't. They may eek out some wins here and there but in the long run, it will be their demise. You have to pose a threat at all times. I want my money on smart aggressive players that make things happen. Not advice, just something to think about.

11-12-2002, 05:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Nineball_King:</font><hr> For the past few weeks I have seen many post about what people thinks makes great players. One CCB poster believe that Efren Reyes' stroke is a sign of his trust in himself. Another believes that a few quality hours a day will get a person to the next level. Also, some posters believe understanding the complicated physics behind the game will help a player play flawlessly. My personal belief is that all the guys that are playing pool for a living have made more balls than me, and in general, put in more table time. Even though Corey Deuel is a year younger than me, I would bet that he has made a couple million more balls than me. I believe that you can get more out of your practice time by knowing some tricks to the trade or you can improve your game by having great playing technique, but that no one can turely reach the next level without putting in an incredible amount of table time and practice.
&lt;br&gt;I guess what I am getting at is; I believe they are a few naturals at ever endeavor, but that the majority has to really work at there game and that if any of us (CCB posters and pool fanatics) wanted to be a pro we would have to quit our jobs and say goodbye to our family and start putting in eight or ten hours a day. I really do not know a pro pool player that does not have a few years in there development that they were not in pretty much constant practice.
&lt;br&gt;
&lt;br&gt;visit www.nineballking.com (http://www.nineballking.com)
&lt;br&gt;
&lt;br&gt;Kevin Whitt <hr /></blockquote>

Thats funny, I think exactly the same thing. It wasn't until I realized that the pro's are merely people who have pocketed millions of more balls than I have, so I began trying to catch up. I figured if they played 4 hours a day, I could play for 8 and might catch up sooner or later.. and it's working, but I can't really play for 8 hours.. however, I spend a great deal of time just hitting in balls, and after only playing pool for 4 years, I'm one of the best players in my area (thats not just my opinion).

The pro's that are pro by 23, started playing pool when they were 13 or so, so they've been playing for twice as long as I have today. If I stick with it, and keep playing like I am for the next 5 or 6 years, I'll be up there with the best.. but the key is patience, persistence, and forgetting about how good you want to be.

Just be the best you can, every shot, every game, every day. Practice makes confidence.

11-12-2002, 09:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> I'd say putting the time in on the table is absolutely necessary, but not sufficient.

I see people who play at some plateaued speed, well below pro or even A level, but put in a lot of time, doing the same things and getting the same (mediocre) result.
<hr /></blockquote>

I agree.
Sure there's a lot more to it, but I think the three main things needed to play well are:
1. An understanding of the game. Practice does no good if all it's doing is reinforcing bad habits. Also, I think it's important not to just know "how", but "why" things happen. For example, hitting the cueball at x changes the angle off of cushion y. Ok, but why? One sees naturally gifted players all the time, but without this component they'll only go so far.
2. Mental toughness. This is one area I myself can use some help in. Being great while practicing at home or playing with friends is one thing, but being able to perform and make sound decisions under pressure are the hallmarks of the best.
3. Practice. Practice the drills and learning the hows and whys. Practice by playing people better than you or participating in tournaments. Practice by confronting those inner demons, making good decisions and performing under pressure.
Just my two cents.
Chris

bluewolf
11-12-2002, 04:20 PM
Thanks for the excellent advice. i have been wondering if I play safe too much.

bw

Patrick
11-14-2002, 09:31 PM
Practice is stupidity, you need to know how the balls rotate. The game is more fun when you play with intelligence and knowledge instead of memory, experience and feel. You will be more consistent when you know what you are doing at the table. You don't need to practice if you only play with intelligence and knowledge, I play pool every 2 months.

Patrick

Voodoo Daddy
11-14-2002, 10:21 PM
Every great athlete in history practiced. Vijay Singh practices before and after each round of golf, Felix Trinidad trains for hours a day leafing up to a major fight and Earl and Efren put mutiple hours on table before big pool events...sure you didnt mean to title your post "Patrick is a moron"? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Patrick
11-14-2002, 10:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Every great athlete in history practiced. Vijay Singh practices before and after each round of golf, Felix Trinidad trains for hours a day leafing up to a major fight and Earl and Efren put mutiple hours on table before big pool events...sure you didnt mean to title your post "Patrick is a moron"? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>Yes, that's why none of them are good players because they play with memory, experience and feel.

Patrick

Voodoo Daddy
11-14-2002, 10:42 PM
<hr /></blockquote>Yes, that's why none of them are good players because they play with memory, experience and feel.
Patrick <hr /></blockquote>


I feel for you kid...really I do.

Patrick
11-14-2002, 11:40 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr>

I feel for you kid...really I do.
<hr /></blockquote>Now you think I have mental disorders and things, but it is really the opposite.

"Imperfection is a disease; humans are a virus" http://vp3.0catch.com/teraarticles.htm#17

Patrick

bluewolf
11-15-2002, 11:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Patrick:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Every great athlete in history practiced. Vijay Singh practices before and after each round of golf, Felix Trinidad trains for hours a day leafing up to a major fight and Earl and Efren put mutiple hours on table before big pool events...sure you didnt mean to title your post "Patrick is a moron"? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>Yes, that's why none of them are good players because they play with memory, experience and feel.

Patrick <hr /></blockquote>

Knowing how the balls rotate is helpful to me, primarily on position. But what is wrong by playing by feel? That to me means that your mind knows the techniques and your body executes them without thinking.

bw

ceebee
11-15-2002, 03:02 PM
this guy gets the TROPHY for "rattling the most cages". Only a dimwit, or someone wanting to stir up dust, would post such a comment. Every GREAT athlete practices. No one has ever heard of the ones that did not practice.

I've heard "it takes all kinds to make up this world..." that's too bad because there are some kinds that are not needed..JMO <font color="black"> </font color>

rackmup
11-15-2002, 03:19 PM
Please do not ridicule Patrick. He has obviously bumped his head on a low overhang and is in need of his medications again.

Patrick! Don't make me stop this car son! Get in the backseat and take your pills!

Regards,

Ken (gets a kick out of our resident "alien")

Eric.
11-15-2002, 03:56 PM
Patrick E. Coyote, SuperGenius...

Voodoo, you know how it is with those lower intelligence alien life forms(Patrick). He does not have the ability/intelligence to comprehend things at this level.

Eric &gt;in the place between space and time

HOWARD
11-15-2002, 03:59 PM
Yes sir, practice is the key. But I believe many of the strong players - started when they were young. Playing their friends, their foes. And practicing.
However I do not believe when they building the knowledge of pool. With all this playing and practice that they look at like practice - like work. For most of them, in my opinion, it was fun. It was a challenge in the beginning. This is what allows one to tirelessly hit ball after ball without audience without thought of improvement - but only getting the joy from it.

HOWARD

Rod
11-15-2002, 05:36 PM
Kevin let me make this profound statement. LOL The secret is knowledge and that comes with dedicated practice and play. Yes it does take a lot of hours.

Patrick
11-15-2002, 06:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bluewolf:</font><hr>
Knowing how the balls rotate is helpful to me, primarily on position. But what is wrong by playing by feel? That to me means that your mind knows the techniques and your body executes them without thinking.

bw <hr /></blockquote>All humans play with feel. The ones they call autistics are not connected to their bodies as much others are, this makes them more open minded. Autistics need to more conciously control their bodies instead of moving naturally and with feel.

Feel is what low intelligent people like humans would use, the more intelligent you are, the less feel you use.
When you have a feeling of something, it is your subconcious that does all the work, you as concious don't know how something works but you can guess and feel it. And most often it is close to what your feeling was.

Like when a very low intelligent human drops something to the ground, he will feel it will get broken but doesn't know why. A more intelligent human would know it gets broken because of gravity, speed and mass.
The more intelligence than feel you use, the more accurate you will be.

Patrick

Patrick
11-15-2002, 06:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr> Every GREAT athlete practices. No one has ever heard of the ones that did not practice.
<hr /></blockquote>They are great in your mind. Why would the ones who don't practice want to show their skill? They are better than everyone else, they wouldn't want to waste their time.

Practice is different for sports where you need to use your body, you don't need to practice in sports where the body is not important. In athletic sports where you don't need intelligence to become good, where you only need the body, then you need to practice of course. In weightlifting you train your muscles so that they get stronger. But it is also possible to consiously control your body and make the muscles stronger and bigger without any training. In weightlifting you need to practice the right technique so you can lift more weight, but if you can lift twice as much as everyone else, then you don't need a good technique. You practice sports to fine tune your body for the movements that are required so you can make them better, and that way you get more efficient at it. The right technique in powerlifting is not important, it is just raw power there, so you don't need to practice the lifts much, you only need to improve your strength.

In chess you don't need to practice, you need to just gain knowledge. Pool is like chess, you need to play with knowledge and intelligence. In chess where you have little time on your clock and you don't have enough intelligence to calculate the moves in that short period of time, then you need to go for the feeling you have. But there isn't much time limit in pool, you shoot all shots long before your time ends.

The reason why everyone thinks you need to practice in pool is because 9-ball is such a simple game, you don't need much skill to run unlimited racks. You use your body in pool when you walk around the table, and you don't need to be accurate in that, so you don't need to fine tune it. The only time you need the body is when you set up the shot and stroke the cue, and that is simple to control conciously, and you must do it in high skill levels. If you want to practice instead of controlling conciously, then you can practice the body technique at home on a table the same height as the pool table. The only thing that is different is the follow through.

You don't need to have your body fine tuned if you don't play pool, it takes about 3 days to get your body fine tuned maximally, after that, you don't improve your skill any further and you need knowledge in order to get better. So the best way is to gain knowledge about pool and if you want to play in a tournament, then you can practice your stroke for 3 days before the tournament to fine tune it. But if you are a lot better than your opponents, then you don't need to fine tune your stroke in order to win.

Patrick

rackmup
11-15-2002, 08:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Patrick:</font><hr>Like when a very low intelligent human drops something to the ground, he will feel it will get broken but doesn't know why. A more intelligent human would know it gets broken because of gravity, speed and mass.<hr /></blockquote>

What if that same "very low intelligent human" drops that same object only this time, it does not break. What do us "very low intelligent humans" think then?

Do we get frustrated because it didn't break and we cannot understand why so we drop it again, and again and finally, again, causing it to shatter only so we can then stand in further amazement and wide-eyed wonder as to why it finally broke on the third attempt even though we initially dropped it several times in hopes of causing it to break?

I'm just trying to understand and graduate from this "very low intelligent human" level to something of greater importance.

Like the other night, I was playing nineball and it was my break. No matter how hard I shot the cueball at the rack or how much force I put into my breakstroke (easily in excess of 25-30 mph), the balls simply would not spread. My opponent looked on in wonder and with a serious look of confusion as well. It was only after my fifth attempt that I finally realized I was missing the entire rack of balls altogether!

By the way...what exactly is a "very low intelligent human"? Is he/she a very demure-in-stature "intelligent" (your wording, not mine) person or simply someone who might be a genius who is asleep on the floor? Could it be an "intelligent" person that lives below the equator? Perhaps he is simply an "intelligent" person that has poor moral values, hence the label "low". Man...I just crave more knowledge!

Regards,

Ken (likes Patrick because he makes me think, only to wonder why I'm thinking...hmmm)

dddd
11-15-2002, 09:21 PM
whats the old line...
Teach them to walk, talk, and tie their shoes
and this is what they do to you.

bluewolf
11-15-2002, 11:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Patrick:</font><hr>
play with feel. The ones they call autistics are not connected to their bodies as much others are, this makes them more open minded. Autistics need to more conciously control their bodies instead of moving naturally and with feel.

Feel is what low intelligent people like humans would use, the more intelligent you are, the less feel you use.
<hr /></blockquote>

In decision making or pool, we have three tools. Mental-the facts, knowlege etc Feelings-emotion , Intuition-this can be also in the psychic realm when knowlege appears to come from an outside force or deep within them.

The mental person, who uses facts, often makes decisions based on the facts available to them. Even when all of the facts are not known, they feel uncomfortable doing this another way.

The person who decides things on emotion only often has not developed the thinking part of their brain.

Intuition- They look at the facts but if all facts are not known, they follow their gut instincts.

Some people are whole brained. The logical, factual part of the brain is highly developed along with the intuitive aspects. Such people are perceived as highly intelligent because they have learned to use more of their brain.

In pool, we learn techniques via our mental capabilities. Playing by feel does not denote playing by emotion. It involves using the knowlege we have required and knowing the shot, position, spin of the balls etc., so well that we do not have to conciously think about it when down on the shot.

Once you know how the balls spin, how they come off the rail,the angle to use when pocketing the ball, etc. a person does not need to think about those things because they already know them.

Autistics do not have superior minds. They are well above average (esp asberger's) in the sense of mental abilities and concepts. Most of them, though are weak in terms of intuition. They have to develop that part of the brain so that their brain will be totally developed.

blu

Voodoo Daddy
11-16-2002, 12:14 AM
Yes...yes I do think you have disorder, or a need to decieve beginners or the easily swayed. Sorry Patrick, your schtick doesnt work on me or most of us but some others might actually buy into your crap &lt;clears throat and looks around&gt;. Too bad you cant come to the US...I'd love to see your "Superior Talents" first hand /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif. Until then, give us a rest and dont polute our environment. /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif

Patrick
11-18-2002, 03:33 AM
It's no use talking to you humans, you don't understand and you never will.

Patrick

Patrick
11-18-2002, 03:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Voodoo Daddy:</font><hr> Too bad you cant come to the US...I'd love to see your "Superior Talents" first hand /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif. Until then, give us a rest and dont polute our environment. /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif <hr /></blockquote>I will not play tournaments, this is why I give everything on my site for free, money is stupid. I will maybe play tournaments when I have developed myself well enough so I can fly or teleport myself to the tournaments.

Patrick

11-21-2002, 12:43 PM
You are correct. In my younger days and before tournaments and leagues. I was able to make a living playing pool.I would played 12 to 16 hours a day for about 6 years In those days. There were BLUE LAWS that would not let any business open on a Sunday.
It always amazed me on Monday how it took me 2 or 3 hours to get back in the zone. Even on an off day I needed to practice 4 to 6 hours in order to keep that edge.
Jack

SpiderMan
11-21-2002, 12:58 PM
I agree 100%, and I'd also add that even with unlimited access to knowlege and nothing to do but practice, there's no guarantee that a person would make it to the top. I still think there are inborn differences in natural ability, depth perception, abstract thinking, coordination, etc, that also figure into the equation that determines how high you rise. To make it to the very top, you need all that potential plus knowlege and practice.

SpiderMan