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bigbro6060
11-12-2002, 09:00 PM
Guys and Gals, with the Stop shot, should the cueball stop dead when it hits the object ball (the cueball is therefore not quite in the position where the object ball was), or should it stop and roll one ball width forward so it is in the exact position that the object ball was in ?

Vicki
11-12-2002, 09:30 PM
I'm not sure if this is technically correct, but it is my opinion that the ball should stop dead. Assuming, of course, that we are talking about a straight in shot. If the cue ball rolls forward, even if only into the spot that the object ball was in, then it's my opinion that the cue ball is following the path of the object ball.

That's a difficult shot sometimes - to only follow a balls width. I'd be interested in hearing any advice on short distance follow. For me, it's easier to just draw the ball a smidge than follow it a smidge.

Vicki

/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <---- I love this smiley! He's so cute!

Cueless Joey
11-12-2002, 09:48 PM
Dead on it's tracks but a little inertia might inch it forward (not roll). Replacing the cueball is just that, replacing the cueball. Or Kinnister calls it shot number one.

Mike H
11-12-2002, 10:18 PM
When you shoot a stop shot, the CB should stop dead in its tracks. The replacement shot requires more practice, but is worth the time and effort. Your stroke must be tight to execute this type of shot on command.

Ross
11-12-2002, 10:41 PM
A stop shot is exactly what the name says. The cue ball stops when it hits the ob head on, because it has no forward or backward spin on it (assuming the cb and ob have the same mass). On a bar table with a heavy cb, you would have to have a bit of backspin to accomplish a stop shot.

To roll cb forward a ball's width, calculate your speed and hit point on the cb for a stop shot. Then either hit "just a bit" higher on the cb or hit "just a bit" softer. Either way, the cb will then have a little forward spin when it hits the ob and so will roll forward a bit. In practice, it seems easier to shoot these shots fairly firmly, slightly above center ball.

CarolNYC
11-13-2002, 04:28 AM
Hi there,
When I am told to "stop" the cueball, the words used are "stick it",which means stopping the cueball DEAD in its track upon contact with object ball-if it rolls into the position where the object ball was,I didnt stick it!:)
Carol

Wally_in_Cincy
11-13-2002, 07:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ross:</font><hr> A stop shot is exactly what the name says. The cue ball stops when it hits the ob head on, because it has no forward or backward spin on it (assuming the cb and ob have the same mass).

On a bar table with a heavy cb, you would have to have a bit of backspin to accomplish a stop shot<hr /></blockquote>

I got burned by that badly in my last APA match. Switching back and forth between bar tables and "real" tables is killin' me. Guess I better get used to it /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ross:</font><hr> To roll cb forward a ball's width, calculate your speed and hit point on the cb for a stop shot. Then either hit "just a bit" higher on the cb hit "just a bit" higher on the cb or hit "just a bit" softer. Either way, the cb will then have a little forward spin when it hits the ob and so will roll forward a bit. In practice, it seems easier to shoot these shots fairly firmly, slightly above center ball. <hr /></blockquote>

I was taught to hit a bit higher.

dave
11-14-2002, 12:08 PM
Others have already correctly defined a stop shot. The purpose of the exercise you describe, when having the cue ball roll forward after contact, is to teach refined cueball control through tip placement. A centerball stop shot is your base stroke speed (medium hit). Using this same stroke speed each time, you can control the cueball's forward or backward movement in half and full ball increments by raising or lowering your tip from centerball in half tip increments either up or down the vertical axis. Having a consistent stroke speed that allows controlled cueball movement after contact improves consistency because you have reduced the need for the additional variable of differing stroke speeds. A golfer doesn't change his swing each time, he changes clubs. A diver rotates at the same speed each dive. The different rotations are changes in timing (some crude analogies). You can hit "soft" and "hard" shots with the same consistent stroke speed if you learn this technique.

Scott Lee
11-14-2002, 06:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ross:</font><hr> On a bar table with a heavy cb, you would have to have a bit of backspin to accomplish a stop shot. <hr /></blockquote>

Ross...this depends on the distance between the CB and OB. Like I showed you, from a short distance (i.e.: 1 foot) a centerball stroke at lag speed (assuming you finish the stroke) will easily accomplish a perfect stop shot...even with a heavy cueball.

Scott Lee

phil in sofla
11-14-2002, 07:35 PM
A reliable way to follow a little is to hit a stop shot speed firmly, with maybe a 1/2 tip above center ball address on the cue ball.

11-19-2002, 03:32 PM
Stop shot with red circle q ball I would suggest hitting q ball half tip below center and don't ease up on your stroke. This should stop Q ball dead. Hitting Q ball in center rther than half tip below without easing up on your stroke should bring Q ball forward approximately 2-3 inches. this doesn't mean that shot needs to be hit hard; just don't ease up on your backhand or qball will go forward. Hope this helps and stop shot IMO should stop dead. Fred

Vicki
11-19-2002, 03:46 PM
Thanks, Fred!

I think the bit you said about not easing up on the stroke is really the key for me. I have excellent speed control when I move the cue ball a distance but seem to lose confidence when the cue is traveling a short distance and it causes me to stroke it like a spineless worm. I have a habit of hitting the ball so easy when I need to follow a smidge that the object ball doesn't make it all the way to the pocket! Nasty. This will definitely help, so thanks.

Vicki

11-19-2002, 07:42 PM
Your most welcome. Fred