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SPetty
11-14-2002, 01:31 PM
Howdy,

I'm hoping for some help in how to get over things that temporarily put you off your game. It may be mental, but may very likely be physical (like an adrenaline rush) as well. You're supposed to just "get over it" or "let it go", but I'm wondering if you have any more particular suggestions or helpful hints to actually get it to be gone.

You know how sometimes you miss a shot and get all bent out of shape over it and it affects your game from there on? Well, I'm actually pretty good about almost absolutely not letting that kind of thing get to me. Missing a shot, regardless of why, normally does not affect my attitude or my game or my performance or whatever. Nor does it affect me if my opponent gets "lucky" or if they run the table. That kind of thing is a part of the game.

However, when a surprise happens, it often totally sends me off kilter. In the past week I've had three of these surprises, and they rattle me. I try to get over them, but it takes longer than I want and often leads to poor performance in the next game or two or three.

One surprise was, in my first game of the 8-ball league play, the guy broke and missed, and I ran down to the 8, leaving myself that simple little cross bank into the corner pocket. You know the one - cue ball and 8 ball both within 2 diamonds of the corner pockets - simple little easy bank shot. I called the pocket, made the shot which then went two rails and slowly rolled into the wrong pocket! <font color="red">Surprise!</font color> My opponent didn't even get to shoot and won the game.

Another was playing scotch doubles 8-ball - my partner left me a pretty tough cut shot into the corner pocket. I made the cut shot, but then through a series of contacts and caroms, the eight ball ended up just slowly rolling into the side pocket! <font color="red">Surprise!</font color> Loss of game and match.

Then, last night, after leaving myself bad on the 8 ball, I made a not too bad safety, leaving my opponent with the cue ball on the head rail and the 8 ball on the foot rail about six inches from the pocket. It could be made, but it wasn't a "gimme". While my opponent was surveying the table and preparing to shoot, one of my teammates came up to the table, pushed the eight ball toward the racking spot and started emptying the pockets! <font color="red">Surprise!</font color> His game had been called but he was supposed to go to the other table.

It's the surprises that get to me because they're so unexpected. After each of these, I could feel the nasty adrenaline rush. It's kinda like when someone jumps out from behind a door and yells "Boo!". It sets off that physical adrenaline thing that takes awhile to get rid of. So this is really a physical issue rather than a mental one, I think. Anyway, are there any suggestions on how to quickly get over these nasty <font color="red">surprises</font color>?

=k=
11-14-2002, 02:00 PM
hate it when that happens.. usally two shots of tekillya will cure shock.. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
11-14-2002, 02:27 PM
Shot o' Beam with a chaser.... HTH /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> ....the guy broke and missed, and I ran down to the 8, leaving myself that simple little cross bank into the corner pocket. <hr /></blockquote>

If you're shooting that good I wouldn't worry too much.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Another was playing scotch doubles 8-ball - my partner left me a pretty tough cut shot into the corner pocket. <hr /></blockquote>

I hear Spiderman's always doing that. Some partner.

As to your question, I have no real answer. Just keep shootin'. Pool is full of surprises. That's part of what makes it so much fun.

Rod
11-14-2002, 02:49 PM
Quote SPetty, It may be mental, but may very likely be physical (like an adrenaline rush) as well.

Sounds like mental that effects your physical. I'm just waiting for the left brain issue to come up. LOL I don't know bout that stuff mam, that's on the third floor!


"leaving myself that simple little cross bank into the corner pocket. You know the one - cue ball and 8 ball both within 2 diamonds of the corner pockets - simple little easy bank shot."

Nope don't know any simple easy shots. Those that look simple have a hidden "supprise".



"I made the cut shot, but then through a series of contacts and caroms,"---------


Well that should not be a real big supprise. The c/b was headed in the general direction of the 8 ball, or not, without a driver! Any time you don't have control anything can happen and usually does. I see this stuff happen all the time. The players says, man what a bad roll, I don't have any luck!



"While my opponent was surveying the table and preparing to shoot, one of my teammates came up to the table, pushed the eight ball toward the racking spot and started emptying the pockets! Surprise!"


Yes that is a surprise. This one you didn't have any control over what happened.


"It's the surprises that get to me because they're so unexpected. After each of these, I could feel the nasty adrenaline rush. It's kinda like when someone jumps out from behind a door and yells "Boo!". It sets off that physical adrenaline thing that takes awhile to get rid of. So this is really a physical issue rather than a mental one, I think. Anyway, are there any suggestions on how to quickly get over these nasty surprises?"


Surprises come in many forms, happy, anger, shock, etc. I know little other than I feel they are mental that shows your physical emotions. This effects some more than others and a short "cool down" might be in order. Distract yourself, say something out loud like, that guy/gal sure has a pretty red shirt/ blouse!, look at all the pups in that poster! or I think a good shot like that calls for a TE KEY LA!! Whatever, but you need to take your mind off the present and put it in the past. You know it isn't going to help if you dwell on the fact.

You might want to consider that those first two episodes were not surprises. I'm sure they were very real to you but it comes with the territory if your not in control of whitey. I hope this doesn't come as a surprise! LOL /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Fred Agnir
11-14-2002, 03:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Anyway, are there any suggestions on how to quickly get over these nasty <font color="red">surprises</font color>? <hr /></blockquote>
The easiest way to flush away the demon shot that haunts you is to screw up another shot. Today's mistakes help you forget yesterday's.

Well, sort of. There's still this 8-ball I missed in '92 or '93 that haunts me today.

Fred &lt;~~~ no help whatsoever

Tom_In_Cincy
11-14-2002, 03:16 PM
SPetty,

You are suppose to learn from these surprizes. You probably did in the past..

Your first example, now you know that you can hit the ball too hard.. next time just hit it a pocket speed or a tad bit more. But never hit the bank hard enough to go twice.

Your second example is one that comes around a lot. You make a tough shot, knowing that the cue ball is going to still have a lot of roll left and is capable of finding a pocket too.. a risk you know you have to take.. to make the shot. Learning to accept these results will help eliminate the surprizes.

The last one.. wow.. what a bummer.. stupidity is always difficult to accept.. expecially from a team member.... such an easy mistake to make from someone that isn't paying attention to what is going on around them.

Surprizes happen. IMO you can't easily get them out of your system quickley. But, take advantage of the experience and learn from it.. or you'll likely end up being surprized again.

MaineEAck
11-14-2002, 04:03 PM
I like to put some chalk on my finger, then wipe it off, as if to wipe away all that happened... When I played soccer, I would pick up some grass and trow it off the field when I messed up... I don't think that will work with pool hahaha...
GOOD LUCK! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan
11-14-2002, 05:31 PM
Once, when playing a tournament at PK's over in The Colony, I shot the game ball firmly into the center of the corner pocket. It split the pocket but didn't fall, the white outline of the "8" staring back at me like an unblinking eye floating in midair.

I stayed down, waiting for it to drop, but it didn't. Finally, the woman belonging to the ass in the size 70 black stretch pants looked around to see what had spanked one of her rolls, and the ball fell. I hadn't even noticed her backing up to my table and "pinching" the pocket. Guess I though she was part of the wall.

SpiderMan

smfsrca
11-14-2002, 05:41 PM
Is this possible.
I looked for something common in each of your examples that may point to the real problem.
Each of the examples you provided was a game losing example. If similar things had happened to you but didn't cost you the game, would they bother you the same way? Would you even remember them?
When you are poised to win the game you may start getting a rush. This may cause you to become less thoughtful about your approach and you will rush things. As you near the end of a certain win keep yourself centered by breathing out slowly or a casual walk around the table, whatever it takes to bring you back into your "A" game for the close.
If you can condition yourself to do this the surprises will occur less frequently.

Steve in CA

Vapros
11-14-2002, 06:21 PM
I'm tempted to say all these troubles are a direct result of playing eight-ball, but I won't. That would be unkind.

Seriously, I suspect you are risking too much on pool night. It isn't likely that you will show a profit from the game, so if you are not getting your money's worth in fun and accomplishment, better take a good look at your motivation. As long as it's just unhappy accidents getting your goat, you have to learn to roll your eyes and take a deep breath and blow it off. Over the long haul you'll get your share of the rolls, as they come and go. If you don't get the hang of dealing with these annoyances, what would you do in the presence of a genuine shark? It might ruin your whole week, and that's too big a price to pay.

Hang loose and be cool. Easier said than done, but you can if you try.

SPetty
11-14-2002, 09:05 PM
I appreciate the responses. I was trying to make a distinction between the "normal" bad things or unhappy accidents (which I handle rather well) and the "unusual" bad things (that I outwardly handle O.K. normally, but the physical "adrenaline rush" part takes awhile to subside). Really, like that physical internal tingling thing you get when someone jumps out from behind the door in the dark to scare and surprise you...

I think smfsrca probably hit it the best. These were all game losing situations, where the game was unexpectedly ended quickly and decisively. I'm really pretty good at shaking off the "normal" "occasional" mishap, but I guess it hits harder when it costs the game.

And, the guy who wiped out the last game bought me a shot of tequila to try to make up for it! He felt awfully bad, to say the least and wouldn't stop apologizing no matter how many times I assured him that it was O.K. - no big deal... (But if I could have handled it better internally, I wouldn't have screwed up my next game so badly...)

Anyway, thanks again guys.

SPetty
11-15-2002, 09:44 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
If you're shooting that good I wouldn't worry too much.<hr /></blockquote>"I got lucky." /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif Really, it was almost a stop shot runout. Even you could have done it! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> I hear Spiderman's always doing that. Some partner.<hr /></blockquote>Just to clarify, it wasn't Spidey. It was this gorilla of a guy who made damn sure I knew that he was very competitive and hated to lose. I know that because he told me that many times before we started, and several times during the games we played. No pressure there! (Nothing like sharking your own partner, eh? /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif)

Wally_in_Cincy
11-15-2002, 09:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> Really, it was almost a stop shot runout. Even you could have done it! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif<hr /></blockquote>

Don't bet on it /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> It was this gorilla of a guy who made damn sure I knew that he was very competitive and hated to lose. I know that because he told me that many times before we started, and several times during the games we played. No pressure there! (Nothing like sharking your own partner, eh? /ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif) <hr /></blockquote>

Blind draw?

Was he actually a good shooter? Some guys that "hate to lose" get a lot of practice at it /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif . I guess that's why they hate it so bad /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bluewolf
11-15-2002, 10:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> Quote SPetty, It may be mental, but may very likely be physical (like an adrenaline rush) as well.

Sounds like mental that effects your physical. I'm just waiting for the left brain issue to come up. LOL I don't know bout that stuff mam, that's on the third floor!


<hr /></blockquote>

Left brain, right brain, just an in vogue term used in an attempt to make something complex simple. Even see it on titles of books. While there are some unique functions on one side of the brain,it works together on most tasks. It is a known fact that if a younger person has a stroke or loses function on one side, the other half can take over the functions of the damaged side.

I have used that term sometimes, and often with humor and am sorry if it was confusing.

According to some reasearch, there is some differences in how people make decisions. Some like facts and analyze all of the options mentally before making a decision. Others go more on emotion or gut to make their decision.These folks do well in pool playing by feel and 'flying by the seat of their pants' while others want to learn by techniques,aiming systems etc. Some can do both and I believe both are needed to be good at pool. We have to learn techniques before we can play by feel, imo.

sorry if this is npr. if it is, please tell me.

bw

Michelle
11-15-2002, 11:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>
Shot o' Beam with a chaser.... HTH /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
<hr /></blockquote>

Yeah, that one always works for me!

Rod
11-15-2002, 06:05 PM
Some can do both and I believe both are needed to be good at pool. We have to learn techniques before we can play by feel, imo.


Thats right we need both but less of the emotional. Emotional feelings/thinking IMO is what ruins our play by feel. It short circuts then the brain doesn't function well, to much conflict. That's the worst way to play pool or do anything for that mater. When your shooting a shot you don't want a brain, per-say. Just let the muscles do what you have trained them to do.

SpiderMan
11-19-2002, 09:12 AM
Yes, he is an "A" player. I expected Spetty to win after drawing him. But things don't always happen as we expect, eh?

SpiderMan