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View Full Version : "I never want to play like that again"



Ludba
11-16-2002, 02:58 AM
I've said it more than once in the past year. Usually, my absolute worst, terriblest, agonizingest nights are while I'm playing against my friends outside of league or tournament play, but that is little consolation. My Poolus Operandi has been to pile on more practice. I'm not sure if this even reduces the number of really bad nights, but it certainly doesn't eliminate them entirely, cf. tonight was pretty bad.

The other small consolation is that I was playing against a really good player. But I never do walk away from the pool hall any less than totally pissed off and dejected at a poor playing performance. And I have to admit that even in the pits of darkness, I'm usually able to pull off three really good shots. Tonight it was two nice safeties and one beautiful back cut then two rails for perfect shape on the next ball.

But when nothing's working, it's just plain awful. The cue feels wrong in my hands, my head feels like it's in the wrong place, and the balls bounce out of the pocket.

Oh, and I just remembered another silver lining to this rain cloud: I was playing on the 9-foot table instead of the 8 footers I normally play on. The cloth was running a lot faster and the pockets are bigger, which of course means more scratches.

Wally_in_Cincy
11-16-2002, 11:57 AM
If you're playing bad you can always blame your cue or your tip /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

like in this picture:

http://www.worldpoolmasters.com/league/Reyes5A.jpg

Even the greatest have bad days............

Sid_Vicious
11-16-2002, 01:00 PM
Wally...Please don't take this as argumentative...I survey my cue tip after shots I've missed if there's any oddity to the sound of the hit. It's usually a habit that has me re-focus, and I usually smirk off the shot afterwards. Point really is, I don't look at the tip for blame but if there was a visable breakdown then I'd see it, otherwise just looking close at the grain of the layering takes my mind away from the dog I just made....sid

bluewolf
11-16-2002, 01:13 PM
I went through 2 months of making excuses for my bad playing (which I imagine is old news to many of you). it was the cue,my hand tremors, something wrong with my eyes. I even went through a series of neuological tests trying to figure it out. It is a good thing I continues to practice during all this.

I thought i was better than I was and my hubbie said i hadnt gotten any better in two months. This was not true I said because my stroke and bridge are much better.

It was all excuses and until I realized that time practicing would take care of itself, I was miserable and in denial.

blu

Chris Cass
11-16-2002, 01:50 PM
Hi Sid,

I gaurantee Efren can't even see the tip if he wanted. He's just waiting for his next shot and looking at the tip is just something to do. LOL I know I can't.

Regards,

C.C.

phil in sofla
11-19-2002, 07:00 PM
Even though I have been playing better than ever, and I'm generally happy with my game, I still have the odd game/set/night where I'm dogging it, seemingly unable to put two simple shots together.

Thankfully, as my mechanics improve, those episodes are becoming less frequent. They used to show up very frequently in ring games or partners games, when it seemed that I couldn't get in stroke, especially if I hadn't warmed up before jumping in the game. Now, those situations are greatly improved, but still I'll have times when any shot is an iffy proposition, at least for a while. Usually, though, I'll shoot myself into stroke in a little bit.

That's one of the ways I mark my progress-- much fewer episodes like that, and generally, I get out of them in a short while, by ignoring how badly I've been shooting, and concentrating on the fundamentals of the shot.

bluewolf
11-19-2002, 11:31 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote phil in sofla:</font><hr> Even though I have been playing better than ever, and I'm generally happy with my game, I still have the odd game/set/night where I'm dogging it, seemingly unable to put two simple shots together.

Thankfully, as my mechanics improve, those episodes are becoming less frequent. They used to show up very frequently in ring games or partners games, when it seemed that I couldn't get in stroke, especially if I hadn't warmed up before jumping in the game. Now, those situations are greatly improved, but still I'll have times when any shot is an iffy proposition, at least for a while. Usually, though, I'll shoot myself into stroke in a little bit.

That's one of the ways I mark my progress-- much fewer episodes like that, and generally, I get out of them in a short while, by ignoring how badly I've been shooting, and concentrating on the fundamentals of the shot. <hr /></blockquote>

This is good phil and it gives me hope. Hope that as I get better, there will be fewer of those off days. I have gotten somewhat dispassionate about those days. I do not get mad, but just accept that I need to get plugging away, practice,learning from better players and taken lessons when they are available to me. I truly believe that things will get better .

blu

dddd
11-19-2002, 11:39 PM
there is a saying
i'd rather be lucky than good.

try
i'd rather be good than lucky!

focus, knowledge, faith, trust yourself. it seems too trite a answer i know, but what i am getting at is
you have the knowledge.
give it focus to aim and shoot properly , trust yourself. its you, you have to trust yourself.
only by consuming all your mind with your planning and shot at hand, will those demons cease to raise their heads and destroy your game

some time ago i would say to the opposing player, after the game "i was just lucky, or i got the good rolls"
well it dawned on me looking at the saying at the top, i said to myself "what am i doing"
i was setting myself up, being negative. i dont do that amymore.
when i win and shake hands or am congratulated on a nice shot i dont say " im just lucky" i say " thank you" and i know i shoot nice shots!

dddd

Ludba
11-20-2002, 03:23 PM
"i'd rather be good than lucky!" describes my philosophy to a T.

"Trust yourself." Not so much to a T. I have been forming the habits of telling myself this before and after every shot lately. This concept will be a big part of my improvement over the next few months. I'm really coming into my own as a player now, and I need to think and act like it. I used to have a very defensive playing strategy, and it worked well for a good portion of my games. In fact my defense is nearly impeccable. But I can't improve if I focus all my energies on my strengths, so I have to start thinking and playing more aggressively, especially since I am quickly becoming a powerhouse shooter.

There are times that my opponent is just unlucky, and there are times when I am hopelessly out of stroke with seemingly no way to recover. It's the kobiyashi maru. The important thing in that situation is not whether you get back into stroke, but rather how you as a person deal with a no-win situation. I myself try to think like a 16th century samurai (I'm not kidding): the outcome is already set, so I must simply put all my effort into the task at hand. But it's difficult to maintain that kind of outlook when my katana has miscued five times in a row. And it's even more difficult since I don't believe in predetermination. But it's about concentrating and being fearless, not about solving problems.

SPetty
11-20-2002, 04:27 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ludba:</font><hr> "i'd rather be good than lucky!" describes my philosophy to a T.<hr /></blockquote>
Absolutely! I just cringe when the "others" say that other thing. There's no way, in the long run, I'd rather be lucky than good. Geez, if that was the case, I'd spend my time gathering rabbit's foots and four leaf clovers rather than practicing!

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ludba:</font><hr>It's the kobiyashi maru. <hr /></blockquote>Battered and fried, with a side of ranch dressing /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ludba:</font><hr>The important thing in that situation is ... how you as a person deal with a no-win situation. I myself try to think like a 16th century samurai: the outcome is already set, so I must put all my effort into the task at hand. But it's difficult to maintain that kind of outlook when my katana has miscued five times in a row. And it's even more difficult since I don't believe in predetermination. <hr /></blockquote>Wow! /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif I don't know anything about 16th century samurais, but I sure like this! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif (Even though I don't know what a katana is...) A slightly different way of looking at things is sometimes all you need in order to be able to stay with it. People like to say "It ain't over 'til it's over", but that's about as helpful as saying they'd rather be lucky than good. Thanks, Ludba.

Ludba
11-20-2002, 08:05 PM
No problem.

By the way, a 'katana' is the long, curved sword of the samurai.

And just so you don't get them confused... if you see a pool player walk away from an embarassing defeat, draw a short sword, and slit his own belly open, make sure you tell the cops that he was using a 'wakizashi,' the ceremonial sword used to commit 'seppuku,' commonly known as 'hari kiri.' We wouldn't want the officer to get it wrong in the report. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif