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Popcorn
11-18-2002, 10:32 AM
I kind of wanted to make a comment regarding practice. I have read a few posts about players practicing hard shots,(very hard shots), as well as seeing people doing it in the pool room. My definition of a hard shot would be a shot that even with practice, would still remain a low percentage shot that, would never be shot by choice. Shots like these do not require practice. Playing good pool consists of doing the simplest of things, with the utmost consistency, that is what champions do. You will never see a champ practicing impossible stuff during a practice session. In fact if watch them practice you would think "Don't they get board doing all that simple stuff all the time"? Sometimes, but that is what the game is. You just have to be a little creative with your practice time so it doesn't become boring. Regarding the hard shots, as long as you try to hit all shots, with the greatest accuracy, the hard shots will just come. No shot should be taken for granted, even a hanger. In a poolroom, I would never go over to someone and tell them they are practicing wrong, but wish I could sometimes. Here it is OK to express ones ideas and I hope it is taken in the spirit in which it is mente.

Wally_in_Cincy
11-18-2002, 11:16 AM
Reminds me of some the stuff I see after APA league night is over. You'll see guys practicing 3-rail kicks, jumps etc. basically just showing off for each other (and pocketing hardly any of them BTW). These are guys who are lucky to make more than 3 balls in a game without getting out of line or missing an easy shot. Methinks their practice time could be better utilized.

Mike H
11-18-2002, 11:24 AM
FINALLY!!!! Someone who understands the whole point of practice speaks out!!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!! I spent quite a few years in local poolrooms working on my game, doing what I gather Popcorn is trying to say is a good, solid routine -- shots and drills that don't require you to take "fliers" very often, but require precision, thought, and cue ball control. During these practice sessions, on a daily basis, no fewer than two other players would approach me, interrupt my routine, tell me I'm wasting my time, I need to swing at this 9 foot shot frozen to the rail, I need to shoot this shot and draw the CB two table lengths, and so on. I am now very happy I was able to shoo them away and do what I knew to be right. Two important keys to success in this game are simplification and execution. Pool is primarily a game of simple to moderately difficult movements, and the more consistently you can execute them, the more successful you'll be. I do believe practicing difficult shots has its place, because there are times when you have no choice but to come with a tough shot. However, it's not worth devoting TOO much time to, as mastering the simpler aspects and shots will win you far more games. I'm glad someone here has thought to start a thread on this subject, maybe it'll open some people's minds up and help their game.
Good luck and shoot straight.

Chris Cass
11-18-2002, 11:28 AM
I totally agree with you Popcorn. Practice is reserved for the shots your having problems with that come up in your previous matches. Also, the 11 common shots that come up consistantly in the game. The jump shot for instance. If I practice my jump for 30 minutes. I'm good for 2 weeks and almost deadly. I do also have a sore shoulder for 2 days but it's worth it. It's like going to the dentist. You kind of don't want to go and put it off but you know it must be done. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Regards,

C.C.

smfsrca
11-18-2002, 11:46 AM
How do you determine which (most difficult) shots you don't need to practice?

Ludba
11-18-2002, 12:04 PM
I think the point is about the mindset you have when practicing. If you are practicing "hard shots" (per your definition), because you don't feel comfortable shooting, for instance, table length shots that have been coming up in your games a lot lately, then that is probably a good idea. If you are practicing fantastically difficult shots that only come up once every 50 games, then you're probably doing the wrong thing. The question you have to ask yourself is,"How often does this shot or this skill come up in a game?" If it's fairly regular, then you should feel comfortable that it has a greater chance of improving your game than a shot/skill that comes up infrequently. That's how you determine which difficult shots you need to practice.

Popcorn
11-18-2002, 12:04 PM
That is not easy to answer, I hope Scott Lee chimes in. But to me if I hardly even cut a ball 90 degrees from eight feet away I would not care. As long as I never miss all the shots that should be easily made. You don't win games making tough shots, you lose games missing easy ones. I would say the answer is work on what comes up in games all the time, the stuff that wins for you. By the way, a hanger is not that easy to deal with. It can be tricky to get position from a ball deep in the pocket. When is the last time you saw a player practicing that though? Just use your common sense, you will know.

stickman
11-18-2002, 12:06 PM
I practice basic drills, and short banks. The only deviation is occasionally I'll setup a difficult shot that came up in a match, and try to figure out how I could have shot it better. Actually the shot itself isn't difficult, but figuring out how to shoot the shot and position myself for the next one is. This is usually due to getting out of line, or not leaving myself an angle to be able to easily play position. A person with better cueball control would seldom get themselves in these situations, but at my level, you have to occasionally be able to figure out how to get yourself out of these messes. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

I just figure them out. I don't spend a great deal of time on them, once I have an idea of how I could have shot it.

SPetty
11-18-2002, 12:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Also, the 11 common shots that come up consistantly in the game. <hr /></blockquote>Hi Chris,

And just which 11 common shots are these? I must have been absent the day they passed out this list. Who's got the list now? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

bigbro6060
11-18-2002, 12:44 PM
i know what's important to me for my practice. I start off with 30 mins of straight stroking and technique drills (fairly boring but i know important with big payoffs)

Then i move onto cue ball control drills and then onto shotmaking (just shots i need work on)

then maybe some games and then it's what i call free time. In the free time part i can practice anything and this is when i will practice swerve shots, jump shots, hard kicks etc, mainly for fun and a challenge

smfsrca
11-18-2002, 12:52 PM
I don't know Scott Lee, but from other posts I understand he is a fine player and teacher. I hope he does chime in hear. By the way, "deep in the jaws" and "long thin cuts" are both part of my practice session.
One is to reinforce my understanding of cue ball reaction to jaw shots. The other for seeing edges and working the smoothness and accuracy of my long distance stroke.

Steve in CA

Tom_In_Cincy
11-18-2002, 06:44 PM
Popcorn,
I usually practice the most difficult shot that rears its ugly head most often. The 'inside english' shot. Close, medium and far ranges.

I have some good drills on my web page that you can printout and also a 'blank' 9 foot table drawing thay you can use to create your own practice drills.

www.geocities.com/cincytom314 (http://www.geocities.com/cincytom314)

SPetty
11-19-2002, 12:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chris Cass:</font><hr> Also, the 11 common shots that come up consistantly in the game. <hr /></blockquote>And just which 11 common shots are these? I must have been absent the day they passed out this list. Who's got the list now? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
<hr /></blockquote>No, really, I'm serious! Every now and again there comes a spurt of info that stands out as something that I haven't heard before. Is this something that all the "good" players know, but us "learners" haven't learned yet. Well? What are these 11 shots? Oops, did you let the cat out of the bag?

Now, if you (the plural form, not just you Chris, but the other CCBers) are gonna get wise-ass on me /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif, let me beat you to it:

1) corner pocket shot
2) side pocket shot
3) straight in shot
4) cut shot
5) stop shot
6) follow shot
7) draw shot
8) bank shot
9) break shot
10) spot shot
11) that special shot that you missed last week

hahaha, so really, what are the "11 common shots that come up consistently in the game"? If these are them, I'm feeling a bit let down... /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

rackmup
11-19-2002, 01:01 PM
I paid $50 to learn the "11 Common Shots" but will share them with you:

[1] This shot
[2] That shot
[3] The other shot
[4] Not this shot
[5] Not that shot
[6] Tough shot
[7] Easy shot
[8] Normal shot
[9] Pro shot
[10] Amateur shot

and the most important shot to know:

[11] Tequila shot

I hope this helps.

Regards,

Ken (SPetty knows #11)

Sid_Vicious
11-19-2002, 01:05 PM
"[11] Tequila shot"

Important thing to look at last with that shot is your a$$...I'm always losing mine in short order trying to keep up with SPetty ;-) sid

SPetty
11-19-2002, 01:38 PM
You guys are sooooo funny /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Well, here's to you for not letting me down! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
http://www.vampyra.com/wit/images/Tequila.gif

Ludba
11-19-2002, 01:42 PM
I do however think that at some point a player's practice routine must progress to include more difficult shots in order to reach the highest levels of play. You are correct to place the greater emphasis on easy shot consistency initially, but any static practice system is bound to fall prey to the law of diminishing returns. Your practice should evolve just as you as a player evolve.

smfsrca
11-19-2002, 02:15 PM
I agree with you, SPetty,
Anyone willing to post such a tantalizing statement should also be willing to follow it up with more detail or retract it.
Steve

Popcorn
11-19-2002, 06:05 PM
That goes without saying. My main reference was directed more to the player that is spending time on the table repeatedly shooting difficult shots and deluding themselves into thinking they are practicing. While at the same time this player commonly misses easy shots, but believes they are easy and don't require practice. Every shot must be hit with accuracy. Even if you make the ball, it may in fact cause you a problem. Pockets, even on a tight table are big enough that you use different parts of the pocket. Just making the ball does not constitute a well made shot. What one may call an easy shot, can be just shot in mindlessly or can be shot in perfectly. Both went in, but one was a good shot and the other was not. That almost barely perceivable accuracy of the one player, is what separates them from the other players. In another post someone refereed to turning you weakness into your strengths. Actually this can't be done. Everyone's skills will always consist of strengths and weaknesses. Champions in every sport become so by taking their strengths and raising them to perfection, while at the same time doing the best they can to improve their weaknesses. Just my opinion.

Rod
11-20-2002, 01:35 AM
Quote SPetty, What are these 11 shots?

You mean you don't know? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif. Just imagine all of the routine shots that come up in a game. Well I don't know exactly what he has in mind either, /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif but I'll take an educated guess. 1, 2, and three rail position shots/routes. Using No or combinations of english shot at different angles to the side or a corner pocket. That takes up a few of the 11. Stun shots are in there also. Slow to med speed straight draw or follow shots. Now if he includes that jump shot as part of the deal I'm going to be disappointed. It may be more common these days but not what I'd call a common shot. Spot shots were very common but unless you play by old rules or one hole it's not.
Well CC your public awaits your answer. Now don't keep us waiting to long we want to learn too!

BTW there is one I forgot for sure, a ball hung in the corner pocket.

Chris Cass
11-21-2002, 11:53 PM
Hi Rod,

I don't think there's anything important for you. These are just shots that come up in every game and will help those under your skill level. To become more effective at table management. For those that say, "I make the hard on then miss the easy one". LOL Said that yesterday. HAHAHAHA

I used to practice these on a regular basis but now my practice as become slightly advanced. Not all that wild stuff but more detailed. You know what I mean. LOL

Regards,

C.C.~~sleeping on the job.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
11-22-2002, 01:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> No, really, I'm serious! Every now and again there comes a spurt of info that stands out as something that I haven't heard before. Is this something that all the "good" players know, but us "learners" haven't learned yet. Well? What are these 11 shots?<hr /></blockquote>

HAHAHHA Aww SPetty,

Do you think I forgot about you? Never! These are just common shots that come up during the game. These aren't difficult and one must be consistant in making them with the desired result. Table speed, positioning and understanding these shots and the way the cb is suppose to be reacting will be important as your skill level begins to rise. After you become somewhat proficient in these shots. The drills become more advanced to get whitey back in line once you drop the chalupa. LOL

Ok, This shot is the straight-in shot. I never will give this shot up. I'll use this shot in every drill session.

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#2) START(
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#4) START(
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#5) START(
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#7) START(
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#8) START(
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#9) START(
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%eA8a9
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#10) START(
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#11) START(
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There you have it. These shots are basic shots that apply in many different situations. Your imagination is key. If you choose to set them up differently or use a certain english? It's up to you.

Look for these shots and see if you agree?

Regards,

C.C.~~strickly my humble opinion. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SPetty
11-22-2002, 09:56 AM
Thank you, Chris. That was quite a bit of work and I truly appreciate it. You're the best!

Luv ya,

SPetty~~~Could have used a little bit of this in league last night!

11-22-2002, 10:12 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I kind of wanted to make a comment regarding practice. I have read a few posts about players practicing hard shots,(very hard shots), as well as seeing people doing it in the pool room. My definition of a hard shot would be a shot that even with practice, would still remain a low percentage shot that, would never be shot by choice. Shots like these do not require practice. Playing good pool consists of doing the simplest of things, with the utmost consistency, that is what champions do. You will never see a champ practicing impossible stuff during a practice session. In fact if watch them practice you would think "Don't they get board doing all that simple stuff all the time"? Sometimes, but that is what the game is. You just have to be a little creative with your practice time so it doesn't become boring. Regarding the hard shots, as long as you try to hit all shots, with the greatest accuracy, the hard shots will just come. No shot should be taken for granted, even a hanger. In a poolroom, I would never go over to someone and tell them they are practicing wrong, but wish I could sometimes. Here it is OK to express ones ideas and I hope it is taken in the spirit in which it is mente. <hr /></blockquote>

Actually, let me give you a different angle on this..

I practice all the easy shots 80% of the time I'm practicing, but I spend at least an hour or two a week practicing difficult cut shots, 90 degree cuts, 95 degree cuts, table length shots, all long shots, low percentage shots.. whatever.. and in doing so, you'll be prepared for ANYTHING. In fact, it has helped my stroke and my pre-shot routine to practice these difficult shots for a while, as well as my aim and my "sure shot."

I call it my sure shot, but it's basically the ONE shot that you need to win, and you kindof hype yourself up about it.. the long, table length strait-in shot that you have to execute almost perfect. Or whatever.. Practicing difficult shots for an hour or two a week will help you tremendously in these areas.. the rest of the time, practice making the game look easy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

John in NH
11-22-2002, 11:20 AM
Hi Popcorn,

In 9-ball if faced with the shots that you describe I will usually play a safety versus trying to execute a difficult shot.

The shots that I practice are the ones that come up periodically in a game of 9-ball and require cue ball control and accuracy in pocketing the shot such as the long rail shot with a slight left to right or right to left angle which allows a player many options for position play and are easily missed if not executed correctly, many times the match is won or lost because of this particularly shot. The shots that come up all the time such as stop, draw or follow I don't practice because they come up routinely in 9-ball.

Regards,

John

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 11:29 AM
Your exactly right, as long as, after you come with the tough shot you get all the way out and don't screw up something that should be routine. Remember you will lose more games by screwing up easy things then you will win making a tough shot. Your 80/20 mix of practice sounds like a pretty good formula.

PQQLK9
11-22-2002, 11:29 AM
Thanks Chris...good work...I owe you a dog biscuit.

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 11:33 AM
I don't know if I am not reading it right or you mean it differently. Are you saying you don't practice any routine shots or situations?

bluewolf
11-22-2002, 01:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I don't know if I am not reading it right or you mean it differently. Are you saying you don't practice any routine shots or situations? <hr /></blockquote>

Being that I have only played diligently (every day) for four months, 95% of my practice is speed drills, straight ins and easy to medium cuts, but will try a difficult shot occasionally when it presents itself. I just tell myself that it is a shot thaz all so I wont be psyched out by a 80-90%cut shot.

blu

John in NH
11-22-2002, 04:43 PM
Hi Popcorn,

Yes that's right, the more I play the less practice I need.

Regards,

John

Popcorn
11-22-2002, 04:48 PM
Interesting concept. Just don't become complacent and satisfied, there is always another level to strive to. I am sure Tiger practices, a lot.

Ludba
11-22-2002, 07:17 PM
"Being that I have only played diligently (every day) for four months"

Really? I thought you were saying somewhere else that you were approaching the year mark. I thought that was why several of your posts say that you're discouraged from not playing well. Man, if you've only been playing seriously for 4 months, you do NOT have to worry about not playing well. Suddenly you're going to hit a new high.

Scott Lee
11-23-2002, 10:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Playing good pool consists of doing the simplest of things, with the utmost consistency, that is what champions do. <hr /></blockquote>

WOW! Truer words were NEVER spoken! Learn to perfect your stroke FIRST...that's where your consistency and confidence will come from! Great post, Popcorn1

Scott Lee

Scott Lee
11-23-2002, 10:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Mike H:</font><hr> Two important keys to success in this game are simplification and execution. Pool is primarily a game of simple to moderately difficult movements, and the more consistently you can execute them, the more successful you'll be. <hr /></blockquote>

Mike...You're RIGHT ON the money here! KISS rules! LOL

Scott Lee

Scott Lee
11-23-2002, 11:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> That is not easy to answer, I hope Scott Lee chimes in. But to me if I hardly even cut a ball 90 degrees from eight feet away I would not care. As long as I never miss all the shots that should be easily made. You don't win games making tough shots, you lose games missing easy ones. I would say the answer is work on what comes up in games all the time, the stuff that wins for you. By the way, a hanger is not that easy to deal with. It can be tricky to get position from a ball deep in the pocket. When is the last time you saw a player practicing that though? Just use your common sense, you will know. <hr /></blockquote>

This is exactly what my advice would be. When I work with a student, regardless of ability, I try to focus on shots that are "repeatable" and "sustainable"! Repeatability means that I can shoot the shot over and over and over, with no mistakes. Sustainability means that I can call up that stroke on demand, regardless of the shot situation!
So...by becoming rote or habitual at the majority of easy shots that will win games, your overall consistency increases, and brings increased confidence with it! One of these is the 'bread n butter' angle that most poolplayers shoot for...which is between 30 and 45 degrees. Shots with these angles make it easier to get position almost anywhere on the table. Rightly stated, hangers are shots that EVERYONE needs to practice. I suggest that a hanger NEVER be left for the next to last shot. They are much too easy to screw up the shape on the next shot, if you are not paying close attention. This is a great thread!

Scott Lee

Terry
11-23-2002, 12:22 PM
Hi Chris, I didn't read the whole thread so I hope i'm on the right track here. I think a shot that is a must to practice is the two rail back to the center table shot from different angles and distances, they come up in every game. Terry

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OnePocketChamp
11-23-2002, 12:30 PM
I typically try to practice shots that seem to come up most often in a game of one hole; i.e., the spot shot, the short one rail shot and sometimes the high draw reverse english three rail kick shot for shape (not recommended for the faint hearted).

Now, seriously I practice the spot shot until I can make at least 10 out of 15 attempts. This sure makes the spot shot in a match easier to make because I have the confidence and the repeated stroke to make it.

Chris Cass
11-23-2002, 12:59 PM
Hi Terry,

Your exactly right. The reason these shots are important is because of there frequency. The reason (as I know you know this stuff anyway) to try to get back to ctr table is to cut the table in half. Which cuts your shots in half.

The better one is at pocketing the easy shots the more ones consistancy becomes. I have an advanced routine for myself but is tailored to me. I've made it up myself and provides a challenge for me to perfect them. I play on both bar box and 9 ft tables and find switching these tables constantly is a challenge. I need to stick with one. LOL

I love the 9 ft. and feel that's the only game in town. However, all the money is on bar box. a dilemma in itself.

Regards,

C.C.

smfsrca
11-23-2002, 02:46 PM
I have read everone of the posts on this thread and have concluded that all of the comments are about shotmaking. There is not a single comment about studying and exprimenting with fundamentals during your practice to better understand the relationship between technique and shotmaking. Good technique leads to good shotmaking.

Study your stance:
What part of your back foot should line with your shot?
How far apart should your feet be?
How should your weight be distributed?
Where should your front foot face?
Should your knees be bent or straight?

Study your approach:
Should you step forward with your front foot?
Should you step backward with your back foot?
Should you face your shot more or less squarely.
Should you swivel your hip and how far?
Where should your chin be? Up, down, left, right.

Study your bridge:
How much pressure should you have between your hand and the table?
What are the pressure points?
Where should your fingers be pointing?
Should your arm be straight or bent.
What kind of pressure should you feel in your wrist? arm? shoulder?

Study you grip/stroke/follow through:
What part of your hand/fingers should contact the cue?
What are the pressure points and how much?
How should this change as you stroke the cue?
What should your wrist, arm be doing?
How far should you follow through?
How long should your warm up stroke be?
What should you be doing during your warm up stroke?
How long should your final stroke be?
Should you have a pause in your stroke? where? how long?

Study yiur aiming:
What part of what should be aiming at what part of what?
Do you aim with/at edges? Peeks? Lights(reflections)? Imaginary targets?
How do you determine targets?
What aiming systems should you be using and when?
How do you aim for deflection, swerve?

This list is by know means complete but I think it is a good start.
Observing, experimenting with and understanding these things is what makes your game what it is.
It is also what makes the game interesting.

Steve

Popcorn
11-23-2002, 03:04 PM
"It is also what makes the game interesting."
Your last line sums it up. If it was easy to do, everyone would be good at it and it would not be much fun. The challenge is endless. While one may shoot a ball in and feel satisfied, another will cheat a pocket and get a better position, yet they looked like the same shots. The different levels of play may not be very easy to see sometimes, but attaining them can take years.

Popcorn
11-23-2002, 06:26 PM
The dreaded spot shot in onepocket. I hate that I more often then not, shoot it in a way so as not to sell out if I miss, or slow roll it when I know I can fire it in. If you fire it and miss, you wish you had slow rolled it. If you slow roll it and lose you wish you had fired it. What ever, when you miss you think you did the wrong thing. Forget about sidebetters, they always think you did the wrong thing if you lose.

bluewolf
11-23-2002, 06:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ludba:</font><hr> "Being that I have only played diligently (every day) for four months"

Really? I thought you were saying somewhere else that you were approaching the year mark. I thought that was why several of your posts say that you're discouraged from not playing well. Man, if you've only been playing seriously for 4 months, you do NOT have to worry about not playing well. Suddenly you're going to hit a new high. <hr /></blockquote>

It is hard for me to evaluate this. Three years ago, I played in md as a two, a beginner two. I played four times and hated dc so moved back home to Roanoke Va. There was no APA there at the time, and whatever other league they had had already started. I went once in awhile to a pool hall and played on 9 foot tables like 2x a week for an hour each time. Then I moved out in the boondocks and didnt get to play pool from aug to dec and bought an 8 foot table. i played on it 2-3 times a week, but had gotten lazy and rusty for about 3 months before my table and me moved back to dc. I got real motivated, thanks to a lesson with scott lee and started practicing everyday 1-2 hours. Since I was an APA 2 3 years ago, they still had me in their computer as a 2, so that is what I started at. I won 50% fo the time against 2 and 3 players and lost to a good four and a six. Recently, my stroke is better and I am hitting balls better, which randy gs pool school helped a lot with these and other things. I learned to draw decent and able using tangents lines in his school

I pretty much am concentrating on the basics, simple to med cuts, only an occ hard cut and really concentrating a lot on stroke, follow and aiming. Well I guess that about sums it up. i did get a jump in improvement recently which makes me feel good after all the practice. Still consider myself a beginner or (scratching and clawing my way to the middle lol) but at least 'i see there is a light at the end of the tunnel and it isnt a train'otoh seems like the more i learn the less i know.

thanks for asking anyhow.

blu

John in NH
11-24-2002, 10:41 PM
"Study your stance:
What part of your back foot should line with your shot?
How far apart should your feet be?
How should your weight be distributed?
Where should your front foot face?
Should your knees be bent or straight?

Study your approach:
Should you step forward with your front foot?
Should you step backward with your back foot?
Should you face your shot more or less squarely.
Should you swivel your hip and how far?
Where should your chin be? Up, down, left, right.

Study your bridge:
How much pressure should you have between your hand and the table?
What are the pressure points?
Where should your fingers be pointing?
Should your arm be straight or bent.
What kind of pressure should you feel in your wrist? arm? shoulder?

Study you grip/stroke/follow through:
What part of your hand/fingers should contact the cue?
What are the pressure points and how much?
How should this change as you stroke the cue?
What should your wrist, arm be doing?
How far should you follow through?
How long should your warm up stroke be?
What should you be doing during your warm up stroke?
How long should your final stroke be?
Should you have a pause in your stroke? where? how long?

Study yiur aiming:
What part of what should be aiming at what part of what?
Do you aim with/at edges? Peeks? Lights(reflections)? Imaginary targets?
How do you determine targets?
What aiming systems should you be using and when?
How do you aim for deflection, swerve?

This list is by know means complete but I think it is a good start.
Observing, experimenting with and understanding these things is what makes your game what it is.
It is also what makes the game interesting."

Hi Steve,

It seems to me that you have taken the fundamentals to the extreme, when thinking about everything that you mention in your post I would become so confused that I would be unable to execute a shot successfully. Pool should be confined to basics and simplicity rather than a miriad of complex maneuvers that don't accomplish anything but a migraine.

Pool is a game of repetition, requires nothing more than pocketing balls and alignment for position on the next ball, and the next and the next, etc, etc.

It's that simple.

Regards,

John

TomBrooklyn
03-28-2003, 08:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote John in NH:</font><hr>It seems to me that you have taken the fundamentals to the extreme, when thinking about everything that you mention in your post I would become so confused that I would be unable to execute a shot successfully. <hr /></blockquote>Sometimes I practice some of the fundamentals that Steve mentioned above. But when I do, I concentrate on only one of those things at a time. I let everything else just happen in accordance with my natural stroke. If I try to concentrate on more than one thing at a time, I find I get less, not more out of it. I usually won't try to work on more than one or maybe two major fundamental things in the same session.

bluewolf
03-28-2003, 08:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote smfsrca:</font><hr> I have read everone of the posts on this thread and have concluded that all of the comments are about shotmaking. There is not a single comment about studying and exprimenting with fundamentals during your practice to better understand the relationship between technique and shotmaking. Good technique leads to good shotmaking.

Study your stance:
What part of your back foot should line with your shot?
How far apart should your feet be?
How should your weight be distributed?
Where should your front foot face?
Should your knees be bent or straight?

Study your approach:
ETC
Steve
<hr /></blockquote>

Ha. I think it is simpler to do what is natural and then get scott or another quality instructor to fix it. Randy g has an excellent 3 day pool school that addresses all of the things mentioned also. So all day with scott one on one or three days with randy, group but individualized...either way fixes all of that stuff.

Laura--&gt; Prefers good instruction to practicing incorrectly