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View Full Version : Mis-Hitting The Cueball Slightly On Hard Shots



TomBrooklyn
11-19-2002, 08:17 PM
This was addressed to Patrick in another thread but was a little off topic for that thread and seemed unlikely to get much attention there. <blockquote><font class="small">Quote pass:</font><hr>When I hit the cue ball hard, I inadvertently put just a bit of right hand english on it. I know its difficult to give advice without seeing my stroke, but do you have any idea what I might be doing wrong?<hr /></blockquote>I am not Patrick, but I am, amongst other things, a High Priest in the revered Temple of Kon-Tiki. Also, I do not know if it makes any difference if you are left or right handed, or left or right brained.

However, I wonder if you would benefit from stroking hard into a soda bottle or by trying to refine your hit location by making practice hits on an elephant cue ball or a striped ball set up level and used as a cue ball.

I wonder if this would help correct the problem or just illustrate it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

=TB=

Rod
11-19-2002, 08:38 PM
If you play right handed you are bringing the cue in closer to your side. It may be your elbow and lower arm or a bow or twist of the wrist to the inside. This can be caused by a change in grip pressure. Be aware of the above when you practice. If your a lefty everything is opposite.

Sid_Vicious
11-19-2002, 09:19 PM
Right or left is also influenced by the orientation of body movement at stroke. I found out that there was much less "off hitting" by standing more square, not the scissor stance, very far from it. It doesn't take much movement when scissored, even bringing the head up at stroke will influence the off hit, it causes a subtle twist in the frame, the direction(R or L off-hit) opposes each other for left or right handers...sid

bluewolf
11-19-2002, 11:19 PM
There is a drill that scott teaches that is helpful that the person is hitting dead center. On pratice strokes (pre shot) I can visually see if the cue is coming to the same place every time. Sometimes there is something crooked about the backswing which was true in my case. ww and I watch each other for stoke imperfections and we video tape.

My stroke is still not perfect, but I see an improvement as I practice. randy really emphasizes freezing after the follow to diagnose the accuracy of the stroke. If in my freeze position, the cue is not pointed at where I intend to aim it, I analyze what went wrong. Is it an imperfection in my stroke? did I lift my head? did I break focus at a crucial moment? was my personal eye pattern out on synch? those are a few things I ask myself. I imagine there can be other reasons for a failed shot or hitting with unintentional english that only very advanced players or a good instructor could pick up on.

blu

Rod
11-20-2002, 12:26 AM
Yes it can be Sid. Most likely the reaction to hit at the ball, instead of thru the ball. A tight grip can cause this body movement or a combination of both. It's like which one comes first, the chicken or the egg. My guess it's the chicken, which is the grip. Of course the real chicken is between our ears.

11-20-2002, 04:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TomBrooklyn:</font><hr> This was addressed to Patrick in another thread but was a little off topic for that thread and seems unlikely to get much attention there. <blockquote><font class="small">Quote pass:</font><hr>When I hit the cue ball hard, I inadvertently put just a bit of right hand english on it. I know its difficult to give advice without seeing my stroke, but do you have any idea what I might be doing wrong?<hr /></blockquote>I am not Patrick, but I am, amongst other things, a High Priest in the revered Temple of Kon-Tiki. Also, I do not know if it makes any difference if you are left or right handed, or left or right brained.

However, I wonder if you would benefit from stroking hard into a soda bottle or by trying to refine your hit location by making practice hits on an elephant cue ball or a striped ball set up level and used as a cue ball.

I wonder if this would help correct the problem or just illustrate it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

=TB=
<hr /></blockquote>

I used to have this problem, so I just started wailing shots in as part of my practice routine. I've noticed that if I pay alot more attention to the cueball, and where I need to strike it, I do much better. I usually look at the cueball last most of the time anyways, but I especially make sure I hit it right on a shot with lots of force.

I also try to use more finesse, and less "strength" when I'm practicing. Power is nothing without control, so I hit shots as hard as I can control. It's easier to stay down that way also, IMO.

pass
11-20-2002, 11:45 AM
Thanks for the help everyone, i'll give your ideas a try tonight. (I'm right handed by the way). Whether I solve the problem or just figure out what the problem is, either would be good.

Maybe I'll set my digital video camera on the end rail and take little video clips of my breaks. I'll really look like a moron while doing it but hey, I'll probably look like a moron anyway. Hopefully I don't jump the cueball into my camera.

I'll let you all know what I find out.

caedos
11-20-2002, 09:54 PM
If you do, you may want to put the video camara behind you to film your grip hand as it moves through the stroke, since your bridge hand should not be moving.

Oz

pass
11-21-2002, 11:34 AM
I didn't get the camera set up, but I tried a few things anyway.

I tried adjusting my stance to widen it out a little bit (less scissors style), but I'm not sure if that helped or not. I'll have to work on that some more.

I tried keeping my elbow further out from my body. It felt a little awkward since i'm not used to having it that far out, but it did seem to help keep my shots more consistently on target when going from medium to fast speed shots.

Finally I monkeyed around with my grip a bit. Before I used my first three fingers and thumb (not sure about my pinky), letting the cue rest on my fingers with a gap between the cue and the vee of my thumb-forefinger. I read in Mizerak's book that he recommends not having a gap, so I moved the cue higher into the V of my hand so there would be no gap, using the first and second fingers and thumb. Seemed to help make my stroke much smoother, but it seemed like I lost a bit of 'touch'. I just read through a previous post on everyone's grips, but I wasn't sure if people had the cue in the vee of their hand, or resting more on their fingers. What do you guys do? It sounds like most people don't even use their forefinger, so I'll give that a try next.

Thanks!