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SteveFromNY
11-20-2002, 07:47 AM
I just can't seem to get a nice flow on games. I play in a team 9 ball league at corner billiards in ny and on nights that I play higher ranked players, I do extremely well (sometimes 7-1, 7-2) but on some nights, I can get killed 1-7. How do you guys develop a more consistent stroke and game??

DSAPOLIS
11-20-2002, 09:52 AM
Many years ago, I posted an article to RSB entitled "Consistency" where I explain that CONFIDENCE is the prerequisite to CONSISTENCY. UNderstand that neither confidence nor consistency are a constant, they rely on many factors and they also rely on the thoughts and actions of the player. "PLaying In the Zone" is not a consatant either. We need to learn how to focus, and then "re-apply" that focus when we are distracted or thrown off course during competition. Focus can be lost due to a distraction, or it can be lost due to concentrating on the wrong thing. A perfect example of this is when a player gets notched on the hill, and instead of focusing on the game shot by shot, his focus turns to the pressure of winning the game. This can overload our senses and make it nearly impossible for our brain to send the correct messages to our physical body, and therefore our focus shifts and affects our motor functions.
There is no greater way to enhance your skill than to practice mentally as well as physically. Many players ignore mental preparation, and pay for it during competition. Mental toughness is not measured by how much you want to win. That is called desire. Mental toughness is achieved through mental preparation, by training your mind to effectively deal with situations instead of freaking out over them. During competition, the player that has prepared mentally can step up to the plate and run out the rack, or do whatever he has to do to ensure his path towards victory. The unprepared player usually approaches the table unsure of himself and his decision making abilities. It will show in the things he does at the table and will probably cost him the match. In pool, the best players sense weakness and once they taste the blood so to speak, its over for their victim.

Chris Cass
11-20-2002, 10:55 AM
Hi Steve,

I'm not sure if it's your stroke? It might be a mental thing. Like a boxer that hit's his opponent and then for some reason moves out to admire his work.

You keep plugging away at it. There are some pretty sporty players there, from my understanding. Losing teaches you to win.

Regards,

C.C.

SteveFromNY
11-20-2002, 12:00 PM
thanks for the responses...I've been playing for a short time (about a year) and in the last 6 months of league action, have gotten tremendously better. I have a generally good understanding of position and speed, but I have to admit, I just cannot focus. I find myself winning almost all of the matches where I've had a 3-4 game lead. And on nights that I start out down by about 2-3 games, I just can't snap out of it. I'm going to have the first of my lessons fron Tony Robles this Friday so I hope I'll improve my game on a mental note. I sure am glad I found this forum though.

PQQLK9
11-20-2002, 01:03 PM
Hey Steve...sounds like the pressure is perhaps getting to you...Just remember that the most important shot is the one you are doing now...Good luck to you and let Tony know that he has a lot of fans on this forum...a class act.

Wally_in_Cincy
11-20-2002, 01:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SteveFromNY:</font><hr> I'm going to have the first of my lessons fron Tony Robles this Friday <hr /></blockquote>

Say hi to Tony Robles from the CCBer's. He loves us /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
.................................................. ........

John Belushi in Animal House:

<font color="blue">Hey it's Otis. He loves us </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bluewolf
11-20-2002, 01:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DSAPOLIS:</font><hr> Many years ago, I posted an article to RSB entitled "Consistency" where I explain that CONFIDENCE is the prerequisite to CONSISTENCY. UNderstand that neither confidence nor consistency are a constant, they rely on many factors and they also rely on the thoughts and actions of the player. "PLaying In the Zone" is not a consatant either. We need to learn how to focus, and then "re-apply" that focus when we are distracted or thrown off course during competition. Focus can be lost due to a distraction, or it can be lost due to concentrating on the wrong thing. A perfect example of this is when a player gets notched on the hill, and instead of focusing on the game shot by shot, his focus turns to the pressure of winning the game. This can overload our senses and make it nearly impossible for our brain to send the correct messages to our physical body, and therefore our focus shifts and affects our motor functions.
There is no greater way to enhance your skill than to practice mentally as well as physically. Many players ignore mental preparation, and pay for it during competition. Mental toughness is not measured by how much you want to win. That is called desire. Mental toughness is achieved through mental preparation, by training your mind to effectively deal with situations instead of freaking out over them. During competition, the player that has prepared mentally can step up to the plate and run out the rack, or do whatever he has to do to ensure his path towards victory. The unprepared player usually approaches the table unsure of himself and his decision making abilities. It will show in the things he does at the table and will probably cost him the match. In pool, the best players sense weakness and once they taste the blood so to speak, its over for their victim. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey, I like this. I am far from being a good player but the journey is great and a lot of fun. Since I never did know the difference between a medium,easy are hard shot, I guess I have developed a funny attitude. Each shot in front of me is just a ball with a pocket waiting. When I am practicing, when I miss one, I never think it is because it is above my sl. I try to figure out what went wrong:did my stroke did something wrong, did I hit too fat or fail to compensate for deflection etc. When one goes in, i look at what I did right. I try to get down on each shot with the same focus, determination and confidence regardless of the 'apparent' difficulty of the shot. In a match I play safe if it is a shot I dont usually make or if I cant run out ,especially if playing against a good shooter.

Hey, the path to being a good player looks long and hard but at least to me, it is a fun path.

blu

Chris Cass
11-20-2002, 02:24 PM
Hey Steve,

Forget Tony. What you need is a big hug from my buddy Carol. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.~~when you get tired of racking, you'll start breaking...

Tom_In_Cincy
11-20-2002, 04:49 PM
David's consistancy post can be read at this link
http://www.cuemaster.com/RSB/consistency.htm

dave
11-21-2002, 09:32 AM
I'd like to add that a lack of confidence is usually due to the knowlege (conscious or unconscious) that you are not adequately prepared to meet the challenge of that particular situation.